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Boosting Iga

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Has anyone tried to boost IgA successfully?

Epicor seems to be the weapon of choice from what I have read, but have not tried it yet, has anyone else tried it?

There are studies supporting the effectiveness of Epicor to boost IgA: Moyad, MA, Robinson LE, Bubak, ME, et al. Immunogenic yeast-based fermentation product reduces allergic rhinitis-induced nasal congestion: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Advances in Therapy. Int. Journal of Drug, Device & Diagnosis Research. 2009;26(8)795-804. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19672568

Also certain lectins are supposed to boost IgA:

Several dietary lectins have been shown to increase IgA. In one study 5 of 6 subjects had increases in the IgA of their saliva after a test meal which included several lectins, including peas and peanuts. Interestingly, although two common components of wheat, gliandin and gluten, have been shown in repeated studies to increase IgA, in this study wheat germ lectin was shown to have no effect. http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/PATHbase/depict.cgi?117 (Gibbons RJ, Dankers I Immunosorbent assay of interactions between human parotid immunoglobulin A and dietary lectins Arch Oral Biol 1986;31(7):477-81)

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I follow a mostly low histamine diet (to lower the amount of antibodies my body produces), and sometimes I take digestive enzymes and also a product called Allerease by Enzymedica to boost IgA. I also occasionally take ViraStop, which is anti-inflammatory. Not sure how well this works, but I have had fewer allergic & histamine reactions these past few months.

Edited by WishClean

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I follow a mostly low histamine diet (to lower the amount of antibodies my body produces), and sometimes I take digestive enzymes and also a product called Allerease by Enzymedica to boost IgA. I also occasionally take ViraStop, which is anti-inflammatory. Not sure how well this works, but I have had fewer allergic & histamine reactions these past few months.

Have you taken tests to see if the Allerease actually works and raises your IgA?

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No, I only got tested for IgE and IgG and my antibodies were high.... but I noticed that allerase lowers my histamine reactions to common triggers (like dust, humidity, etc) and decreases some allergy symptoms like runny nose and itchy eyes. I don't know how to even test for IgA...I'm guessing through an allergist? And also, allerase's effect is temporary, I don't think it has a long-lasting impact unless I take it every day so I would have to get tested right after taking it to judge.

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You can test IgA in the serum (blood) or in the stool. Regular blood test.

IgA is the antibodies operating in the mucous membranes and what they should be looking for when testing for celiac disease.

And they are what should be the first line of defense, which is one of the reasons injected vaccines for infectious diseases like flu don't work very well.

More http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/200416-what-i-found-about-ige-vs-igg-food-allergies/?p=3075190

I was just looking in something I posted in that old thread and am wondering now if what we want to do s boost macrophages.

Edited by alternativista

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You can test IgA in the serum (blood) or in the stool. Regular blood test.

IgA is the antibodies operating in the mucous membranes and what they should be looking for when testing for celiac disease.

And they are what should be the first line of defense, which is one of the reasons injecte vaccines for infectious diseases like flu don't work very well.

More http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/200416-what-i-found-about-ige-vs-igg-food-allergies/?p=3075190

I was just looking in something I posted in that old thread and am wondering now if what we want to do s boost macrophages.

If would think we want to boost sIgA if the levels are really low, below the reference values

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You can test IgA in the serum (blood) or in the stool. Regular blood test.

IgA is the antibodies operating in the mucous membranes and what they should be looking for when testing for celiac disease.

And they are what should be the first line of defense, which is one of the reasons injecte vaccines for infectious diseases like flu don't work very well.

More http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/200416-what-i-found-about-ige-vs-igg-food-allergies/?p=3075190

I was just looking in something I posted in that old thread and am wondering now if what we want to do s boost macrophages.

If would think we want to boost sIgA if the levels are really low, below the reference values

Are they below reference values?

Anyway, boost them with a healthy lifestyle, not drugs. That's nearly always the answer to whatever ails you.

Boosting IgA antibodies that work in your mucosal linings and are one of the most important parts of your immune system. They are your first line of defense against airborne and ingested pathogens.

-Endorphins and anything that produces them - laughter, music, affection, physical activity, some foods like chocolate, anything you enjoy, sex! Boosts the production of IgA and perhaps other antibodies.

-Natural Circadian Cycle/Sleep

Study: Bright light exposure during the daytime affects circadian rhythms of urinary melatonin and salivary immunoglobulin A. http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/10373104 Abstract says 'These results are consistent with the hypothesis that bright light exposure during the daytime enhances the nocturnal melatonin increase and activates the mucosal immune response.' Which basically means it's good for IgA antibodies that work in mucus linings that are an important part of your immune system.

More: http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/230714-good-things-for-the-many-factors-that-lead-to-acne/?p=2585034

Edited by alternativista

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This post cites several studies on the initial events involved in acne formation two of which mention macrophages. They are tedious to read but I'm pretty sure the first on is a study done on normal skin and states that macrophages were elevated.

But most info I've found sound like you don't want to elevate macrophages as they initiate immune response. I can't find whatever I saw this morning in that thread about the antibodies involved in allergic response, especially the delayed type hypersensitivities that are involved in acne.

Really, what you always want to do is normalize levels of whatever.

Edited by alternativista

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Aah! Here's what I saw, in the sweetjade post:

In a Type III delayed hypersensitivity reaction, IgG forms an immune complex with the allergen/antigen (Ag), which activates the complement pathway and releases inflammatory mediators wherever the immune complex is deposited. This process takes anywhere from several hours to several days, which is why hypersensitivity reactions are delayed. Although macrophages pick up the IgG-Ag complexes immediately, they have a finite capacity to do so. If there are a lot of antigens present, the macrophages may saturate their capacity to remove the immune complexes, causing the excess to be deposited in tissue. Depending on which tissues are involved, deposition of these IgG-Ag complexes may result in the following health concerns:

* Vascular deposition: headaches, vasculitis or hypertension

* Respiratory tissue deposition: alveolitis, asthma and recurrent infections

* Skin deposition: dermatologic conditions

* Joint deposition: joint pain

* Rhinitis and angioedema may occur as a result of histamine release by immune complexes

IgG allergies are difficult to diagnose because reactions do not occur until hours or days after ingestion of an allergen. This makes it extremely difficult to determine which foods are the causative agents. Blood spot testing for IgG provides a simple and practical means for practitioners to uncover potential causes of allergic reactions and allergy related disease. For detailed information on sample collection, go to the Test Specification Sheet.

From a testing lab: http://www.rmalab.com/index.php?id=18

Study showing relationship between IgG antibodies due to a food intolerance and Migraines:

http://www.ncbi.nlm....pubmed/18693538

Edited by alternativista

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Has anyone tried to boost IgA successfully?

Epicor seems to be the weapon of choice from what I have read, but have not tried it yet, has anyone else tried it?

There are studies supporting the effectiveness of Epicor to boost IgA: Moyad, MA, Robinson LE, Bubak, ME, et al. Immunogenic yeast-based fermentation product reduces allergic rhinitis-induced nasal congestion: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Advances in Therapy. Int. Journal of Drug, Device & Diagnosis Research. 2009;26(8)795-804. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19672568

Also certain lectins are supposed to boost IgA:

Several dietary lectins have been shown to increase IgA. In one study 5 of 6 subjects had increases in the IgA of their saliva after a test meal which included several lectins, including peas and peanuts. Interestingly, although two common components of wheat, gliandin and gluten, have been shown in repeated studies to increase IgA, in this study wheat germ lectin was shown to have no effect. http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/PATHbase/depict.cgi?117 (Gibbons RJ, Dankers I Immunosorbent assay of interactions between human parotid immunoglobulin A and dietary lectins Arch Oral Biol 1986;31(7):477-81)

Yeah, those lectins boost IgA by causing an allergic response which is a bad thing. They involve IgA because those lectins bind to the mucosa (where IgA lives) that lines your digestive tract and protects it from your digestive acids. They bind to it and 'eat through it.' You don't want to be consuming them.

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Has anyone tried to boost IgA successfully?

Epicor seems to be the weapon of choice from what I have read, but have not tried it yet, has anyone else tried it?

There are studies supporting the effectiveness of Epicor to boost IgA: Moyad, MA, Robinson LE, Bubak, ME, et al. Immunogenic yeast-based fermentation product reduces allergic rhinitis-induced nasal congestion: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Advances in Therapy. Int. Journal of Drug, Device & Diagnosis Research. 2009;26(8)795-804. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19672568

Also certain lectins are supposed to boost IgA:

Several dietary lectins have been shown to increase IgA. In one study 5 of 6 subjects had increases in the IgA of their saliva after a test meal which included several lectins, including peas and peanuts. Interestingly, although two common components of wheat, gliandin and gluten, have been shown in repeated studies to increase IgA, in this study wheat germ lectin was shown to have no effect. http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/PATHbase/depict.cgi?117 (Gibbons RJ, Dankers I Immunosorbent assay of interactions between human parotid immunoglobulin A and dietary lectins Arch Oral Biol 1986;31(7):477-81)

Yeah, those lectins boost IgA by causing an allergic response which is a bad thing. They involve IgA because those lectins bind to the mucosa (where IgA lives) that lines your digestive tract and protects it from your digestive acids. They bind to it and 'eat through it.' You don't want to be consuming them.

Thanks for your response. My IgA levels are just below the reference values, so I'd want to get my levels up. EpiCor is a supplement, more like a probiotic, but it is not. Probiotics boost IgA production too and I would not consider them "bad".

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Has anyone tried to boost IgA successfully?

Epicor seems to be the weapon of choice from what I have read, but have not tried it yet, has anyone else tried it?

There are studies supporting the effectiveness of Epicor to boost IgA: Moyad, MA, Robinson LE, Bubak, ME, et al. Immunogenic yeast-based fermentation product reduces allergic rhinitis-induced nasal congestion: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Advances in Therapy. Int. Journal of Drug, Device & Diagnosis Research. 2009;26(8)795-804. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19672568

Also certain lectins are supposed to boost IgA:

Several dietary lectins have been shown to increase IgA. In one study 5 of 6 subjects had increases in the IgA of their saliva after a test meal which included several lectins, including peas and peanuts. Interestingly, although two common components of wheat, gliandin and gluten, have been shown in repeated studies to increase IgA, in this study wheat germ lectin was shown to have no effect. http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/PATHbase/depict.cgi?117 (Gibbons RJ, Dankers I Immunosorbent assay of interactions between human parotid immunoglobulin A and dietary lectins Arch Oral Biol 1986;31(7):477-81)

Yeah, those lectins boost IgA by causing an allergic response which is a bad thing. They involve IgA because those lectins bind to the mucosa (where IgA lives) that lines your digestive tract and protects it from your digestive acids. They bind to it and 'eat through it.' You don't want to be consuming them.

Thanks for your response. My IgA levels are just below the reference values, so I'd want to get my levels up. EpiCor is a supplement, more like a probiotic, but it is not. Probiotics boost IgA production too and I would not consider them "bad".

Laughter, hugs, sex....Anything that releases endorphins. Natural circadian rhythm (sunlight/dark exposure, wake/sleep cycle)

And I wouldn't consider probiotics bad either. ??? My comment was about harmful lectins.

Edited by alternativista

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1. Epicor

First Line of Defense. EpiCor strengthens a first line of active defense by helping increase secretory immunoglobin A (sIgA) in saliva.* sIgA is the primary antibody found in mucus, tears, saliva, mother’s milk and other areas(i). When pathogens get past your skin, eyes, mouth and other mucus membranes, sIgA is there to help by trapping bacteria before they cause harm(ii). So, what happens when the first line gets breached? That is when a second line of defense comes in.http://www.epicorimmune.com/what_is_.../how-it-works/
Diese Ergebnisse werden im Allgemeinen der Tatsache zugeschrieben, dass EpiCor® zu gesunden IgA-Konzentrationen im Speichel führt sowie die Produktion und Funktion von Eosinophilen und Lymphozyten optimiert. (Moyad, MA, Robinson LE, Bubak, ME, et al. Immunogenic yeast-based fermentation product reduces allergic rhinitis-induced nasal congestion: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. Advances in Therapy. Int. Journal of Drug, Device & Diagnosis Research. 2009;26(8)795-804.)

http://www.puremed.net/Aktuell/TopTh...munsystems.php

2. Oliveoil, coconutoil and hazelnutoil

Monounsaturated Oils: Oils such as olive, hazelnut, coconut can enhance TH1 cytokines which help balance the immune system. The adult therapeutic dose may be in the range of 4 tablespoons daily. Monounsaturated fats found in olive and hazelnut oils reduce TNF and increase IgA levels. http://www.diagnose-me.com/treatment...ated-oils.html

3. Brown rice extract (BR) increases IgA

http://books.google.de/books?id=mOSi...iga%22&f=false

4. Lectins

Several dietary lectins have been shown to increase IgA. In one study 5 of 6 subjects had increases in the IgA of their saliva after a test meal which included several lectins, including peas and peanuts. Interestingly, although two common components of wheat, gliandin and gluten, have been shown in repeated studies to increase IgA, in this study wheat germ lectin was shown to have no effect. http://www.dadamo.com/knowbase/PATHbase/depict.cgi?117 (Gibbons RJ, Dankers I Immunosorbent assay of interactions between human parotid immunoglobulin A and dietary lectins Arch Oral Biol 1986;31(7):477-81)

5. Other supps

IWDL have a good page on (secretory) IgA:

http://www.iwdl.net/secretory%20IgA.htm

They list the following nutritional factors as being key: Choline, EFA’s, glutathione, glycine, phosphatidylcholine, Vit C & Zinc.

Immunomodulation is where one agent is used to stimulate an immune response against another (usually similar) agent. Its basically the same idea as vaccinations. Withcandida the usual agent chosen is the friendly yeast S. Boulardii. This is deemed similar enough to candida (both are yeasts) to elicit the correct immune response. S. Boulardii will certainly increase SIgA, but whether these antibodies are specific to Boulardii or general enough to target candida is not clear. So to answer your question - I don't know. Certainly its possible to increase general IgA. http://curezone.com/forums/am.asp?i=287941

6. Herbs, especially licorice, Vit A and TCM

Scute root, and licorice root increase IgA supply (Smol’ianinov, et al, 1997, Dharmananda, 1988). Carotenes and vitamin A are essential for IgA. A TCM Yin-tonifying formula containing cornus fruit (shan zhu yu or C. officinalis), dioscorea, moutan, poria mushroom, cooked rehmannia root, water plantain rhizome (ze xie or Alisma plantago-aquatica ), schisandra berry, and honey-fried astragalus root has been shown to significantly stimulate small intestine IgA secretion in an animal model (Sakushima et al., 1997). http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com...and-herbs.html
In treating my own patients, I have found that taking probiotics, along with supplemental enzyme formulas with deglycyrrhizinated licorice, seems to greatly increase IgA production. http://www.crohns.net/Miva/education....oILVRlmZ.dpuf

7. Fasting

Immunoglobulins, specifically IgA, are the antibodies produced by your body to identify, bind to and neutralize foreign substances that enter your mucous membranes. Juice fasting has been shown to increase IgA immunoglobulin levels, and immune function in patients with diseases of the skeleton, muscle, and connective tissue, with these benefits lasting beyond the length of the hospital stay, according to a 2001 study in "Research in Complementary and Classical Nutrition Medicine."http://www.livestrong.com/article/42...#ixzz2glIoMReN

8. Lactoferrin, Vit A

To increase IgA, consider Lactoferrin and Vitamin A. - See more at: http://www.betterhealthguy.com/a-dee....iPpFq9lH.dpuf

http://www.ht-mb.de/forum/showthread.php?1206528-IgA-Mangel-Austauschthread/page15

Potential IgA boosters.

Edited by Undergroundwellness

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