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paigems

Scared About Starting A Low Glycemic Load Diet

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Hey everyone,

I have PCOS and lots of acne and oily skin. I have wanted to start a low gl diet for a while now, but my college meal plan has gotten in the way. In about a month, though, I'll be able to eat whatever I choose, and I'd really like to try this. I'm really scared though, and I know that probably sounds funny. I worry that the diet will be difficult (not because of willpower) but because of knowing what to eat and preparing those things everyday because I usually do not do a ton of cooking. I also worry about social eating. For example, my boyfriend is vietnamese and we like to eat at a vietnamese restaurant once a week or once every other week. I like to get beef or pork with veggies, but I don't know if I'll still be able to do this in the future because of the sauces they use to make it. I believe they add some sugar in the cooking process too. I'm also worried because I'll be living at home and eating differently than the rest of my family. Do you guys have any advice? Maybe some tips you wish you knew when you first started, especially tips for someone new to cooking?

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you'll have to make some sacrifices, sure, but you don't have to go crazy with it. if you're consuming a decent amount of processed sugar now, just simply cutting that could be all the change you need. that's pretty much all i've done. whole grain stuff, brown rice, white and sweet potatoes etc. are fine for me. absolutely no liquid sugar (soda, mllk) or sweets however. following this i am 99.9% clear. i don't worry about sugars in stuff i cook with (bbq sauce for example), just be conscious of it and limit it a bit. keep an artificial sweetener on hand.

basically, if i were you i'd work your way up to the obsessive level. you may find it won't be necessary. the diet i'm on now is really not that big of a deal, just have to explain to some people why i'm ordering just water/diet soda or why i can't stuff my face with sweets. small price to pay in my opinion, finally being clear is an amazing feeling. Good luck!

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Get over it. It's not that hard. And it's not a tragedy if you make a mistake.

And yeah, there's sugar in the repaired fish sauce. I think the peanut sauce usually tastes pretty sweet too. So don't have that much of it. And avoid Asian iced teas. They usually brew them nasty bitter and strong, then add a ton of sugar to compensate.

Edited by alternativista

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As others have said, making sacrifices is part of the process. We all do it and we live through it. Some of us follow very strict diets but we still have friends and social lives.

Why don't you and your boyfriend create a new tradition: once a week cook a healthy Vietnamese dish at home.

Cooking is not hard. You have the internet - make use of this magical resource, there a a hundred thousand simple recipes waiting for you.

Encourage your family to eat healthier. Prepare healthy and tasty low GI meals for the family - that should win them over.

Making a big change like this is hard, I know. But it has to be done. Just go for it - there is no one ever that's regretted making healthier life choices. All the best.

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I don't have PCOS but I used to work with a girl who did at a clothing store. I remember her switching over to a healthier diet (could have been low GI?) and the changes in her skin and weight were astounding. She had virtually NO acne once she reached her ideal weight and her skin looked awesome, all the inflammation was gone.

Though it's hard work a good diet can have dramatic impact on PCOS symptoms. PCOS is not reversible and you will always the condition (regardless of what people say) but you can definitely achieve remission from many of the symptoms and totally manage the disorder.

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Thanks to everyone who has taken the time to respond so far. Although I have PCOS I am actually very thin (5'6" 120lbs). I don't have cysts either, just acne, oily skin, and a tiny bit extra hair than most people. Like I said in my first post it's not the self control thing that scares me. I'm very disciplined, and I know I'll be able to stick to a diet. I guess it's just that I'm nervous about doing it wrong, not being strict enough, or not knowing what to cook. I like the idea of cooking homemade vietnamese food though :) It's also really encouraging to hear that you knew someone who saw improvements with diet sweetstyle! I hope I will be able to do the same.

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I just thought of something I'm confused about regarding a low gl diet. I know low gl does not mean low carb, but what carbs are ok to incorporate into your diet on a regular basis without messing up your blood sugar? I know there's veggies, but are there other carbs that are ok to eat every day?

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I just thought of something I'm confused about regarding a low gl diet. I know low gl does not mean low carb, but what carbs are ok to incorporate into your diet on a regular basis without messing up your blood sugar? I know there's veggies, but are there other carbs that are ok to eat every day?

First of all, have you considered the effects of gluten on your PCOS and acne? Many people - even those who tested negative for Celiac Disease - find they function better without gluten and grains. A simple Google search has shown me that a number of people with PCOS (like this blogger) have improved their condition by going gluten-free.

I would advise that in your quest for a healthier, blood sugar stabilizing diet that you:

- Avoid commercially processed foods.

- Give up refined sugar completely. This may seem nuts but, take it from me, it's totally doable and it becomes very easy with time.

- Eat quality protein at all meals. For example, free range eggs and pasture raised chicken and beef.

- Do not eat low fat. Enjoy generous helpings of coconut oil, fresh avocado, and animal fat.

- Consume a gram of cinnamon spice after each meal.

- Eat plenty of leafy greens. Also include fruits and foods like squash, pumpkin, sweet potato.

These are the things that helped me. I have blood sugar problems but eating in this way helps me tremendously. The cinnamon tip may seem like a small thing but it's an important part of my diet - try it.

Edited by sleptember

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Oh wow, thanks for taking the time to write all that out! I have considered that gluten may be causing me a problem; I just haven't had the chance to cut it out yet. The only gluten free option my dorm offers is the salad bar, and if I only ate from that I think I would start look a bit like a skeleton lol. Next month when I'm living at home again I'll try to implement your tips. I've already been busy pinning tasty looking recipes on pinterest that I'd like to try :) Do you (or anyone else) have any thoughts on quinoa? I really like quinoa and I'm wondering if it's something that would be ok to eat regularly.

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