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Garrettryan

Should I Switch?

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Hello,

I've been using Retin-A cream 0.05% now for about 8 weeks.. and the breakouts are fairly steady, and I believe my face is worse off then when I started. I've been considering switching to the gel for but the only available strength for the gel around me area is 0.025%... Which is only half the current tretinoin concentration. Some people say since the delivery vehicle in the gel is stronger that the difference won't matter ect ect.. I'm just curious on your guys' opinions, and that if any of you guys tried the cream and seen better results with the gel?

Also any advice, questions, or comments are appreciated!

Thanks!

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You are applying Retin-A (tretinoin)? Has your derm brought up adapalene (Differin)? Adapalene is much gentler than Retin-A is.

My skin is fairly strong, in the sense of being irritated easily.. the only issue I'm having is the breakout, and if I should switch to the gel (considering the cream is known to potentially cause breakouts in some people). I don't think differin is covered by my insurance.. so im pretty much just stuck with the choice of Retin-a cream 0.05% or gel 0.025%.

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You are applying Retin-A (tretinoin)? Has your derm brought up adapalene (Differin)? Adapalene is much gentler than Retin-A is.

My skin is fairly strong, in the sense of being irritated easily.. the only issue I'm having is the breakout, and if I should switch to the gel (considering the cream is known to potentially cause breakouts in some people). I don't think differin is covered by my insurance.. so im pretty much just stuck with the choice of Retin-a cream 0.05% or gel 0.025%.

The cream has more moisturizers in it to offset the dryness, while the gel is more suited for oilier (particularly very oily) skin. The gel does penetrate easier, but it's also more drying. You really better off with the cream to offset the dryness/irritation as it is quite common and can get worse in the very dry and cold winter months.

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You are applying Retin-A (tretinoin)? Has your derm brought up adapalene (Differin)? Adapalene is much gentler than Retin-A is.

My skin is fairly strong, in the sense of being irritated easily.. the only issue I'm having is the breakout, and if I should switch to the gel (considering the cream is known to potentially cause breakouts in some people). I don't think differin is covered by my insurance.. so im pretty much just stuck with the choice of Retin-a cream 0.05% or gel 0.025%.

The cream has more moisturizers in it to offset the dryness, while the gel is more suited for oilier (particularly very oily) skin. The gel does penetrate easier, but it's also more drying. You really better off with the cream to offset the dryness/irritation as it is quite common and can get worse in the very dry and cold winter months.

Do you believe the better absorption of the gel would make up for the difference in strengths if i was to use that? and I find the cream is making me much more oily then I would like to be, which is also another consideration for switching.. so I want to give the gel a try, I just want to make sure its strong enough to match the 0.05% cream I was using

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You are applying Retin-A (tretinoin)? Has your derm brought up adapalene (Differin)? Adapalene is much gentler than Retin-A is.

My skin is fairly strong, in the sense of being irritated easily.. the only issue I'm having is the breakout, and if I should switch to the gel (considering the cream is known to potentially cause breakouts in some people). I don't think differin is covered by my insurance.. so im pretty much just stuck with the choice of Retin-a cream 0.05% or gel 0.025%.

The cream has more moisturizers in it to offset the dryness, while the gel is more suited for oilier (particularly very oily) skin. The gel does penetrate easier, but it's also more drying. You really better off with the cream to offset the dryness/irritation as it is quite common and can get worse in the very dry and cold winter months.

Do you believe the better absorption of the gel would make up for the difference in strengths if i was to use that? and I find the cream is making me much more oily then I would like to be, which is also another consideration for switching.. so I want to give the gel a try, I just want to make sure its strong enough to match the 0.05% cream I was using

I can't remember what study I read it in, but I recall seeing that the dosages were equally effective and it was just the matter of irritation. The lower gel one was definitely more irritating though than the cream.

A lot of people can't tolerate the redness and irritation from tretinoin, especially with the gel which is why derms usually prescribe the cream-based one.

If your skin is definitely oily and that's a problem for you and don't have a problem with retinoid-induced irritation, go for the gel. If you do wind up not tolerating the gel, just switch back to the cream.

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mate check the ingredients of the cream, I've heard it contains isopropyl myristate or some similair ingredient which is comedogenic (clogs pores). Gel's better for acne and cream's better for anti aging in my opinion.

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mate check the ingredients of the cream, I've heard it contains isopropyl myristate or some similair ingredient which is comedogenic (clogs pores). Gel's better for acne and cream's better for anti aging in my opinion.

Various "comedogenic" ingredients have only been to be found so in rabbit skin. Rabbit skin is more sensitive to topical agents than human -- if it's a bit comedogenic in rabbit skin, it would not be the same in human skin. True comedogenic agents are rare nowadays, and would likely be that way if you applied gobs of the pure substance on your skin.

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partially true, isopropyl myristate is rated a 5, and forms the standards for comparison of comedogenic ingredients. it's fair to say a rabbit's ear isn't the best model however given our acne affects us enough to be on a site based around acne treatment, it makes sense to avoid those ingredients that research caims to be highly comedogenic.

by the way they're not as rare as you might think

i'm just giving Garrett some advice based on my own experience to help him find what works for him :)

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