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mike*

Reversing & Formation Of Intolerances

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Hello:

I'm a long-time lurker and have found the boards very helpful! I was wondering if someone could give me some advice:

I had moderate acne, which 100% cleared up with a course of Accutane. On my last course, I pretty much ate every item acne-sufferers are told to avoid, yet suffered no consequences. Afterwards, I started getting the odd pimple, got "atopic eczema" on my face, and then after having 2 surgeries within 2 weeks, developed (for the first time ever) cysts (possibly due to antibiotics -- side note: I was foolishly on them for about 3 years). I also began a second course of Accutane in April and will finish next month. Before now, I've never noticed a correlation

between my diet and skin condition -- i.e. I could binge and not break out for 3 weeks. However, I made various dietary modifications:

March-May: fruits, vegetables, rice, beef, chicken ONLY

April: course 2 of Accutane

May-August: cut out fruit & rice, anti-candida regimen, coconut oil, oil of oregano, probiotics

August-now: fruit is in again, only supplementing with 50 mg zinc daily

I find that now whenever I "cheat"(such as a very tiny bit of cream in coffee), I will develop very tiny zits that subside in a couple of days. I've only cheated 3 times (Yogen Fruz on my birthday, cream in coffee 2x), but it seems like there's a pattern. My questions are:

1) Can avoiding these foods cause one to break out when they are consumed again.

2) Should I stop consuming dairy (for instance) for life or can I build a tolerance to it by consuming small amounts gradually every few days?

3) Do consuming foods to which you're intolerant even cause these types of zits, or is it primarily cysts?

P.S. I also had a food intolerance test done back in May, which revealed intolerances to literally everything except fruit, most vegetables (I was intolerant to lettuce?), meat, and coffee.

P.S.S. I have naturally very dry skin (even before Accutane) and I am definitely prone to eczema (which my naturopath believes to be psoriasis), so it's not like consuming these foods causes oily skin for me.

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You've messed up your body quite a bit with the antibiotics and accutane. You really need to work on rebuilding gut flora. *(check out the gut healing/flora thread, It's been helping a lot of us lately!) With all of those food intolerances you definitely have gut damage.

To answer your questions:

1) Can avoiding these foods cause one to break out when they are consumed again?

If you have an intolerance to them, yes, absolutely. And often times worse than before.

2) Should I stop consuming dairy (for instance) for life or can I build a tolerance to it by consuming small amounts gradually every few days?

Ifyou're noticing a reaction, you should definitely stop consuming. At least until you spend a significant amount of time healing your gut and working on rebuilding your gut flora.

3) Do consuming foods to which you're intolerant even cause these types of zits, or is it primarily cysts?

People get all sorts of reactions from food intolerances, from cystic acne, to different types of acne, to psoriasis, to mental issues, to joint pain, etc etc etc. There really are no rules when it comes to this, people react to things in a variety of ways.

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I've already tried various methods, such as probiotics for several months, oil of oregano, coconut oil, an anti-candida regimen, various supplements, a meat/veg-only diet. It didn't seem to do too much for my skin, and I felt like I was dying, until I added fruits back in. I guess I just don't understand why suddenly react to dairy (in the form of a small zit) only after avoiding it/trying to try to fix my gut, but this would never happen before (i.e. I would consume a bit of cream every day and not break out for a few weeks). I also have an anaphylactic reaction to peanuts and I remember my allergist suggesting that by gradually consuming small amounts of the allergen, you can help eliminate/reduce the allergy. I know that the allergic response is different (IgA vs. IgG), but wouldn't this same principle apply to food "intolerances"?

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I know that the allergic response is different (IgA vs. IgG), but wouldn't this same principle apply to food "intolerances"?

Depends on the cause of the "intolerance." If it is gut flora-related, the path to recovery could be a lot more complicated. No one really knows the genesis of a lot of food intolerances, but Dr. Art Ayers thinks it is gut flora.

Food intolerance is actually the inability of an individual's incomplete gut flora to digest certain types of food. Antibiotics, for example, can kill off species of bacteria that are needed to completely digest certain types of soluble fiber or other plant products, phytochemicals, so instead of producing the needed short chain fatty acids, other irritating molecules are produced and the digestive system is upset. Simple intolerances, such as lactose intolerance, can be remedied by just eating small amounts of yogurt containing fermenting bacteria, probiotics, that have the genes for enzymes that can digest lactose. In a couple of weeks, most people are permanently able to tolerate lactose. More complex intolerances may require more persistent pursuit of the missing bacterial species by eating many different types of raw vegetables with clinging soil bacteria.

It's also important to note that (scanty, at best) clinical evidence has shown that gut flora modification via food and supplements does not persist after treatment stops, so, theoretically, you would have to continue ingesting whatever it was stimulating the right kind of bacterial growth in order to maintain your current state.

Edited by Bearishly

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I don't know if probiotics for several months is enough. I feel like it may take multiple different types of probiotics and probiotic foods, for a really long time, to see improvement. I don't think you should give up fruits anyway. They are allowed on the specific carb diet which is intended for gut healing.

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In reality, food intolerances don't exist. They are called that because most Dr's don't know how to test for them or understand the significant roll they play in our health. A good example is Celiac's Disease. It is a Allergy to Gluten, not a Disease. The protein in Wheat that causes Celiac is only 1 of 27 toxic proteins found in Wheat. Basically, you have a 1 in 27 chance of being diagnosed with Celiac with their current "Medieval " testing for it. The reason SO MANY people are not diagnosed with a Gluten allergy. Modern medicine...huh

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In reality, food intolerances don't exist. They are called that because most Dr's don't know how to test for them or understand the significant roll they play in our health. A good example is Celiac's Disease. It is a Allergy to Gluten, not a Disease. The protein in Wheat that causes Celiac is only 1 of 27 toxic proteins found in Wheat. Basically, you have a 1 in 27 chance of being diagnosed with Celiac with their current "Medieval " testing for it. The reason SO MANY people are not diagnosed with a Gluten allergy. Modern medicine...huh

Well that explains to me why I am allergic to wheat and not gluten itself. I had a gluten intolerance blood test done and it came back negative but I KNOW that I am allergic to wheat. Anytime I eat it I break out, get large dark circles under my eyes, get tired and can't think properly and it also affects my stomach.

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In reality, food intolerances don't exist. They are called that because most Dr's don't know how to test for them or understand the significant roll they play in our health. A good example is Celiac's Disease. It is a Allergy to Gluten, not a Disease. The protein in Wheat that causes Celiac is only 1 of 27 toxic proteins found in Wheat. Basically, you have a 1 in 27 chance of being diagnosed with Celiac with their current "Medieval " testing for it. The reason SO MANY people are not diagnosed with a Gluten allergy. Modern medicine...huh

Well that explains to me why I am allergic to wheat and not gluten itself. I had a gluten intolerance blood test done and it came back negative but I KNOW that I am allergic to wheat. Anytime I eat it I break out, get large dark circles under my eyes, get tired and can't think properly and it also affects my stomach.

Wheat is Gluten. So are Barley, Rye, Spelt, & Oats*.

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In reality, food intolerances don't exist. They are called that because most Dr's don't know how to test for them or understand the significant roll they play in our health. A good example is Celiac's Disease. It is a Allergy to Gluten, not a Disease. The protein in Wheat that causes Celiac is only 1 of 27 toxic proteins found in Wheat. Basically, you have a 1 in 27 chance of being diagnosed with Celiac with their current "Medieval " testing for it. The reason SO MANY people are not diagnosed with a Gluten allergy. Modern medicine...huh

Well that explains to me why I am allergic to wheat and not gluten itself. I had a gluten intolerance blood test done and it came back negative but I KNOW that I am allergic to wheat. Anytime I eat it I break out, get large dark circles under my eyes, get tired and can't think properly and it also affects my stomach.

Wheat is Gluten. So are Barley, Rye, Spelt, & Oats*.

I know that, but I don't break out from any of those other gluten containing foods. Only from wheat. It makes sense if wheat has 26 damaging protiens in it as well as gluten that I would break out from it. That's all I was saying.

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Yeah there are some people who have a wheat allergy but can eat things like barley. It's usually more rare though. I would still probably avoid gluten if possible, at least in major amounts.

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Yeah there are some people who have a wheat allergy but can eat things like barley. It's usually more rare though. I would still probably avoid gluten if possible, at least in major amounts.

Barley, for me, caused Arthritis & Acid Reflux among other things. Point is, ppl may think it's ok to consume because they aren't aware what it is doing to them. Most ppl have no idea that their hidden food allergies are causing their health problems.

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Yeah all I know is my stomach is all sorts of messed up and I have no idea where to begin. I feel like I barely eat anything when I cut wheat, dairy, and most high GI foods. I would eat like a bird and had even worse stomach aches than before. I was tested for Celiac and it came up negative but it does for most people. I have esophageneal reflux along with many other fun gastrointestinal problems. And it definitely projects onto my face. I hate stressing out about what to eat. But you gotta do what you gotta do.

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Yeah all I know is my stomach is all sorts of messed up and I have no idea where to begin. I feel like I barely eat anything when I cut wheat, dairy, and most high GI foods. I would eat like a bird and had even worse stomach aches than before. I was tested for Celiac and it came up negative but it does for most people. I have esophageneal reflux along with many other fun gastrointestinal problems. And it definitely projects onto my face. I hate stressing out about what to eat. But you gotta do what you gotta do.

Sounds sort of like weak stomach acid to me. Ever looked into it?

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Well there's really nothing to look into, my stomach is all sorts of fucked. I know and have a laundry list of what's wrong at my house with all the fun medical terminology but that's not important. My doctor was great it was just overwhelming how much stuff I had wrong with no idea how to end it besides going off of gluten to see if I have an allergy that irritates my esophagus, which has remained irritated.

And I'm wondering now, with my skin itchy from head to toe, if maybe I do have a gluten intolerance. I'm going gluten-free again because I am just so fed up. I go see the dermatologist on Monday and it is much too far away for me. I am miserable and have been for the past two months with this constant itching. I'm 99.9% sure I have scabies (woohoo). I just need the prescription stuff and the tests to prove it.

It's ridiculous how many things can be the culprit of an all over itchy body. I have no actual hives or rash it just freaking itches and I scratch it of course and it develops into a tiny red bump or bumps. I hate the world right now, not gonna lie. Why is there so much wrong with me? :(

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We never really got down to the nitty-gritty of my post. I am wondering why my body has become sensitive to the things I've been avoiding. For instance, having cream gives me a zit or two a few hours later, but before I cut out dairy, gluten, grains, soy, etc., this never happened. Is it possible that this has to do with digestive enzyme secretion? I learned in my nutrition class that the enzymatic activity in the pancreas is proportional to the amount of macronutrients in the diet (i.e. if you eat a lot of fat, the pancreas makes & secretes more lipases) and that for this reason, it takes time for your digestion to adjust when changing your diet. Is it possible that because we're not exposed to, say cream, on a regular basis, your body "forgets" how to properly digest it, which then sets off a chain of events, which is then manifested cutaneously? This is just anecdotal evidence, but I've never noticed a strong correlation between diet and my skin, UNTIL I started being more restrictive in my diet and "cheated" (barely). Anyone else endure something similar?

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We never really got down to the nitty-gritty of my post. I am wondering why my body has become sensitive to the things I've been avoiding. For instance, having cream gives me a zit or two a few hours later, but before I cut out dairy, gluten, grains, soy, etc., this never happened. Is it possible that this has to do with digestive enzyme secretion? I learned in my nutrition class that the enzymatic activity in the pancreas is proportional to the amount of macronutrients in the diet (i.e. if you eat a lot of fat, the pancreas makes & secretes more lipases) and that for this reason, it takes time for your digestion to adjust when changing your diet. Is it possible that because we're not exposed to, say cream, on a regular basis, your body "forgets" how to properly digest it, which then sets off a chain of events, which is then manifested cutaneously? This is just anecdotal evidence, but I've never noticed a strong correlation between diet and my skin, UNTIL I started being more restrictive in my diet and "cheated" (barely). Anyone else endure something similar?

Studies have shown that gut flora needed to produce digestive enzymes increase and decrease in population in proportion to how often those foods are consumed. It could be that you're just naturally low on certain ones due to genetics and cutting out that food for a time made those strains (and enzymes) even scarcer as a result.

As far as dairy intolerance goes, Dr. Art Ayers (who is cited frequently here) thinks reversing this is simply a matter of ingesting quality probiotic dairy for a time in order to replenish the proper gut flora.

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As far as dairy intolerance goes, Dr. Art Ayers (who is cited frequently here) thinks reversing this is simply a matter of ingesting quality probiotic dairy for a time in order to replenish the proper gut flora.

It's interesting that you note this because I only ever "cheated" after my probiotic ran out, however it was not dairy-based. I think I'm definitely going to have to pick up more. Perhaps once I finish another month of probiotics, I should start experimenting a bit more in my diet. I've been thinking about this and perhaps the whole "enzyme thing" is the reason why people break out when consuming a "cheat food" and then go back to the strict diet -- the body is not given time to adapt. Would you recommend a probiotic capsule or consuming yogurt/kefir? Also, I'm wondering how often I should try reintroducing these foods? Maybe once every 4-5 days? I still want to maintain a very healthy diet, but I don't care who you are, life is so much better when you can treat yourself to pizza/dessert/Starbucks/glass of wine/pasta/even a sub every now and then. It's little things like that that I feel I miss out on and would like to get back.

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We never really got down to the nitty-gritty of my post. I am wondering why my body has become sensitive to the things I've been avoiding. For instance, having cream gives me a zit or two a few hours later, but before I cut out dairy, gluten, grains, soy, etc., this never happened. Is it possible that this has to do with digestive enzyme secretion? I learned in my nutrition class that the enzymatic activity in the pancreas is proportional to the amount of macronutrients in the diet (i.e. if you eat a lot of fat, the pancreas makes & secretes more lipases) and that for this reason, it takes time for your digestion to adjust when changing your diet. Is it possible that because we're not exposed to, say cream, on a regular basis, your body "forgets" how to properly digest it, which then sets off a chain of events, which is then manifested cutaneously? This is just anecdotal evidence, but I've never noticed a strong correlation between diet and my skin, UNTIL I started being more restrictive in my diet and "cheated" (barely). Anyone else endure something similar?

I don't know--and I would also like to know. This has happened to many, many people. I saw it in a lot of people that I talked to on the celiac.com forums, as well as here and in other places--and of course in myself. In fact, I feel like I am the most extreme example of this. It just seems that when you give up bad things, your body shuts a door and won't tolerate you re-adding them back. But I have no idea about the science behind why.

Edited by dejaclairevoyant

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As far as dairy intolerance goes, Dr. Art Ayers (who is cited frequently here) thinks reversing this is simply a matter of ingesting quality probiotic dairy for a time in order to replenish the proper gut flora.

It's interesting that you note this because I only ever "cheated" after my probiotic ran out, however it was not dairy-based. I think I'm definitely going to have to pick up more. Perhaps once I finish another month of probiotics, I should start experimenting a bit more in my diet. I've been thinking about this and perhaps the whole "enzyme thing" is the reason why people break out when consuming a "cheat food" and then go back to the strict diet -- the body is not given time to adapt. Would you recommend a probiotic capsule or consuming yogurt/kefir? Also, I'm wondering how often I should try reintroducing these foods? Maybe once every 4-5 days? I still want to maintain a very healthy diet, but I don't care who you are, life is so much better when you can treat yourself to pizza/dessert/Starbucks/glass of wine/pasta/even a sub every now and then. It's little things like that that I feel I miss out on and would like to get back.

In my experience, it's easier to tell if kefir has live cultures (it's fizzy), but from what I've read on the boards, the surest way to make sure your cultures are live and active is to grow them yourself. dejaclairevoyant can speak to that process better than I can.

When you do reintroduce foods, it seems you should do it in small amounts over a long period of time to let your body adjust. If my bacteria theory holds, you would need time for those strains to populate in response to the food they're being asked to digest.

Also, if you're taking probiotics, I can't underscore the importance of prebiotics. Probiotics can be killed in the stomach and never reach the intestines. Prebiotics feed the good bacteria with no risk of them being damaged by stomach acid.

I don't know--and I would also like to know. This has happened to many, many people. I saw it in a lot of people that I talked to on the celiac.com forums, as well as here and in other places--and of course in myself. In fact, I feel like I am the most extreme example of this. It just seems that when you give up bad things, your body shuts a door and won't tolerate you re-adding them back. But I have no idea about the science behind why.

I think the food-specific bacteria strains I cited have a lot to do with this. Google 'gut enterotypes' and you'll see that there is new research showing that people have distinct 'gut types' just like we have 'blood types.' These enterotypes are determined but a predominance of a certain strain, in simple terms a strain that digests carbs, one that digests protein and fat, etc. This would explain why people break out from different foods, but they don't necessarily have allergic reactions.

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The sensitivity most of us experience is a interesting topic. I look @ it this way, what was my bodies 1st reaction to Gluten? I was a baby so I have no idea. I would imagine my immune system has been in "high gear" ever since though. When you eliminate it, your immune system can return to normal function but still ready to over react when needed. Now that your older, you can tell.

They (doctors, researchers, ect...) are trying to desensitize people with Egg allergies. They say for some people the allergic reaction stops when they reintroduce after a absense ( a real egg allergy test (Egg White/Yolk IgG) before & after would be nice) BUT they don't know if it is causing problems in other ways. I would love to know what damage a Egg allergy does to the body. Gluten overshadowed all of my other allergies by a lot. After I eliminated Gluten, most of my other allergies where quite obvious & not as damaging ( I think anyways).

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The human body is a mysterious thing. Through all of the studies and all of the testing you can be positive about a few things but because everyone's body is so different and the random sensitivities some of us have we can never really "explain" why all of a sudden cream is making you break out.

Your body can develop an allergy or intolerance at any point in your life. It sucks but I know through experience. It seems to me like you have a pretty good idea of what your body can tolerate and what it cannot. Don't sit there and question it, it will consume your life. Just accept it and move on.

And dairy is meant for infant cows. Dairy sucks and I have no idea why it's praised so much. It's fortified with good vitamins, sure, but there are plenty of other ways to get those.

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