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shell516

Bp Reaction? Too Much?

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Hello! I began the regimen in January of this year and my very mild acne cleared up quickly. Then, of course, I got careless and my skin started acting up. I decided to go back on the regimen and stay on it. (Just as a side note, I've always used the cleanser - never strayed from that - mainly just stopped using the BP) Anyway, I applied the BP on Monday night and all seemed fine. Then I applied it last night and woke up in the middle of the night feeling flushed and itchy around my chin and jawline. This NEVER happened to me before. Why is this happening? Did I jump on the BP too quick? Maybe apply too much? Or have I developed an allergy?

Help!

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when i started using benzaclin (has 5% bp in it) again i was red and itchy for a week until my skin got used to it. i do make sure to use a heavier moisturizer about 10-15 minutes after i apply it so that helps a bit but i think you are fine. you might have applied too much as well so take it easy tonight and make sure to really lather on the moisturizer and you should be good to go.

Edited by tracy521

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Hello! I began the regimen in January of this year and my very mild acne cleared up quickly. Then, of course, I got careless and my skin started acting up. I decided to go back on the regimen and stay on it. (Just as a side note, I've always used the cleanser - never strayed from that - mainly just stopped using the BP) Anyway, I applied the BP on Monday night and all seemed fine. Then I applied it last night and woke up in the middle of the night feeling flushed and itchy around my chin and jawline. This NEVER happened to me before. Why is this happening? Did I jump on the BP too quick? Maybe apply too much? Or have I developed an allergy?

Help!

Sounds like contact dermatitis. Happens to around 10% of BP users.

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shell516, did you jump to the full dosage right away? If so, you're just using too much, too soon. From the literature I've read, allergic contact dermatitis occurs in less than 1% of BP users, and even then it depends on the strength and the product formulation. It's my guess that it's just irritation in your case. Wait until your skin gets better (moisturize a lot), then build up more slowly. If it's an allergy (that does happen, unfortunately, even if you've used it before without a problem), you'll know soon enough. Good luck!

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shell516, did you jump to the full dosage right away? If so, you're just using too much, too soon. From the literature I've read, allergic contact dermatitis occurs in less than 1% of BP users, and even then it depends on the strength and the product formulation. It's my guess that it's just irritation in your case. Wait until your skin gets better (moisturize a lot), then build up more slowly. If it's an allergy (that does happen, unfortunately, even if you've used it before without a problem), you'll know soon enough. Good luck!

Yeah, sorry, I don't know what the dermatitis percentages are specifically for 2.5%. But for 5% and 10% it was really high.

In a 1977 study using a human maximization test, 76% of subjects acquired a contact sensitization to benzoyl peroxide. Formulations of 5% and 10% were used.

Leyden, James J.; Kligman, Albert M. (1977), "Contact sensitization to benzoyl peroxide", Contact Dermatitis 3 (5): 273–75, doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1977.tb03674.x

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Yeah, sorry, I don't know what the dermatitis percentages are specifically for 2.5%. But for 5% and 10% it was really high.

In a 1977 study using a human maximization test, 76% of subjects acquired a contact sensitization to benzoyl peroxide. Formulations of 5% and 10% were used.

Leyden, James J.; Kligman, Albert M. (1977), "Contact sensitization to benzoyl peroxide", Contact Dermatitis 3 (5): 273–75, doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1977.tb03674.x

I guess they're talking about all varieties of contact dermatitis. But even then, 76% sounds like a ridiculous amount, maybe that's why it was called a "human maximization test". In all studies I've read, I've never come across such a high percentage. Do you have the full study, so we can have a look at the details? I've tried to look it up, but the only link I can find is to a paid version.

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Yeah, sorry, I don't know what the dermatitis percentages are specifically for 2.5%. But for 5% and 10% it was really high.

In a 1977 study using a human maximization test, 76% of subjects acquired a contact sensitization to benzoyl peroxide. Formulations of 5% and 10% were used.

Leyden, James J.; Kligman, Albert M. (1977), "Contact sensitization to benzoyl peroxide", Contact Dermatitis 3 (5): 273–75, doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1977.tb03674.x

I guess they're talking about all varieties of contact dermatitis. But even then, 76% sounds like a ridiculous amount, maybe that's why it was called a "human maximization test". In all studies I've read, I've never come across such a high percentage. Do you have the full study, so we can have a look at the details? I've tried to look it up, but the only link I can find is to a paid version.

Human maximization is just an old term that we now call human skin sensitization test. I'll see if I can get the full study for you later. But this is how a skin sensitization study is conducted:

21-Day Cumulative Irritation Test

The CIT measures inflammatory response to an irritant. It occurs immediately and only at the site of exposure. The response tends to be universal (produces a reaction in most individuals) and depends on the strength and duration of exposure. In this type of test products are applied to human subjects under an occluded patch, usually on the back, and graded daily for a total of 21 days. A known irritant and a non-irritant are run as controls. The scores are summed across all subjects to provide a cumulative irritation score. The score can be compared to the large pool of historical test data to make judgments about irritation potential. An additional challenge phase can be run two weeks after the last patch was removed to understand potential for sensitization, which is usually measured with the HRIPT.

Human Repeat Insult Patch Test – Sensitization, Allergic Response

Sensitization is the process by which a person becomes, over time, increasingly allergic to a substance through repeated exposure to that substance. It is very different from irritation because it involves immune response, the reaction becomes worse with repeated exposure, and it is usually specific to individuals. The HRIPT consists of 2 phases, possibly 3.

Phase I is the Induction Phase where product is applied to the skin a few times during the course of a week. This is a followed by a two-week rest period after which the skin is exposed to the product again in Phase II or the Elicitation Phase. A response in Phase II is usually allergic in nature and Phase III is used to verify and better define the reaction.

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Human maximization is just an old term that we now call human skin sensitization test. I'll see if I can get the full study for you later.

Ah, of course! eusa_doh.gif Gosh, I've read so many studies on guinea pig maximization tests lol.gif *feels stupid*

Thanks for trying to find the study! My guess is that it's the occlusive patch plus the high(er) concentration of BP (and/or the vehicle), since I've never read about percentages this high before. More recent studies talk about percentages of up to 1% (allergic contact dermatitis), so it would be interesting to see how this study was performed and what products they've used (formulation). You'd say there must be an explanation for the huge difference.

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Also, when using BP, don't start off the bat using it overnight. Build your skin tolerance up by using it 1 hour for 3 days, 2 hours for 3 days, 3 hours for 3 days and then overnight. If your skin continues to be irritated by the BP after a few weeks, stop, and let your skin heal for a few weeks before trying anything else.

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Shell, sounds like you're definitely using too much. I used to use the full dose (2 pumps twice per day) for months and then once clear dropped down to 2 pumps of BP once per day. But every now and again I jump back to twice per day (if I feel a few bumps under my skin) and I do that for more than 3 days my face gets red and gives a burning/itchy sensation. So even though I use BP every day, my skin is still not tollarant to using the full dose.

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sometimes, less is more. This is one of those cases, dont ramp up BP unless you have to, theres no turning back once you ramp up the dose and your skin adjusts to it. no need to rush to that point :)

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