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Guest beccau08

Thinking About Accutane

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Guest beccau08

Hi everyone my name is Becca and I'm 19 years old suffering from moderate sever acne for the last 3 and a half years.

I finally built up the courage to make an appointment with a dermatologist.

I always believed natural was better but it just hasn't done anything good for me.

So I made my appointment for October 9th a long ways away they were all booked up and the only one to take me without insurance.

Anyways I'm pretty sure they're going to try to prescribe me antibiotics or topicals like they did my sister but I want to go on accutane after researching it for well over a year I think it is my best option.

My sister went on retin-A with no improvement we have very similar skin and I don't want to buy a million products and end up on accutane anyways.

So can I straight up ask for accutane?

I get cystic acne on my chin mostly my right cheek and in between my eyebrows and they are pretty constant.

So what are your thoughts on accutane?

Thank you.

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So, I know for a fact that they will not/ should not prescribe you accutane right off the bat unless it's like super omega severe... Accutane is unfortunately a temporary fix. 1 in 4 get acne again which seems ridiculous when a possible side effect could be blindness. retin-A is a topical version of accutane anywho they are both synthetic derivatives of vitamin A. But, I don't wanna ramble with information you already know... BUT have yyou ever thought about hormonal treatments like spironalactone? that's a step up from retin-a and a step down from accutane. my guess is any doctor is gonna make you go through a bunch of medications before the big nuclear bomb of an acne treatment. I hope everything works out though! really! don't lose hope you are still very young and it will most likely go away naturally ;)

p.s. this is me after 8 months of retina..just for a reference

before

after/today

i'm 20 btw

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Hi Becca!

Unfortunately you usually need to go through all the topicals and pills before they prescribe you Accutane. Although I have heard of some stories where people had moderate to severe acne and their dermatologists decided to put the fire out by prescribing Accutane, mainly to prevent scarring/further scarring. Personally, I used nearly all the topicals available, and nearly all the antibiotics available for over 10 years. Sometimes they cleared me up like the above poster experienced, and other times, my acne just became even worse and inflamed. For example, retin-A gave me rosacea, while Differin worked well only 80-90% of the time, yet Tazorac made my face explode into a mess. Plus, long-term antibiotic use can seriously damage your gut flora, which can compromise your digestion, be linked to food sensitivities/allergies, and weaken your immune system. If anything, using antibiotics for many years to control acne is worse than a 4-6 month course of Accutane. Plus, no one wants to be on birth control for the rest of their life. Even that is dangerous.

I'm not saying Accutane is more safe, or even that it's not dangerous. Every treatment has its pro's and con's. I'm just saying that I wish I had taken accutane earlier in my life to avoid scarring. It really hasn't been as scary as people make it out to be.

One more thing...going to a dermatologist is a great idea and they should help you, but hopefully you will trust them and follow their advice. You can even ask your dermatologist for a course of action. If X medicine doesn't work, then we'll try Y, etc. That's what my derm did for me, since I'm an over-analyzing worrywart and need multi-action plans to feel safe. haha

Good luck and be brave!

p.s. You can still be a natural kind of girl and use acne medicines. This includes eating organically, using herbal medicine, exercising, etc. No worries, mon. :)

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Guest beccau08

I figured they would have me try different things but I have insurance and I can't afford buying a ton of products to not have them work.

I know accutane isn't a sure thing but I'm willing to trying that over topicals. Topical have never worked and I mean never even if I used them consecutively for a week or more nothing would change I would have to pop it for it to actually start to heal.

I still have a long time until I can get in to my appointment so we will see if I have a change of heart until then.

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Guest beccau08

Can anyone tell me price ranges for accutane with no insurance?

Including all the visits, birth control, blood tests, and medicine.

Please and thank you.

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$661.xx for Claravis/Amnesteem 40mg capsules Qty: 60. You can divide that up to get the price per pill. 30mg pills are not much cheaper.

Here's my advice to you: LIE! Everybody lies, so just do it. Tell your soon-to-be dermatologist that you have been on ...<insert list here>... I could send you the list I used, but it is pretty dramatic in that it includes every topical (on-label) for acne. I'd also lie and say that I had been on Minocycline or Tetracycline (look up dosages if you want to be more accurate and seem easily convincing). Most dermatologists will not prescribe Accutane right off the bat because of the dogma that surrounds it. The only truly worrisome side effect (that isn't simply annoying) is teratogenicity. If you are female, know you will also be required to pay for birth control, a monthly qualitative hCG urine test, lipid panel, CBC, and CMP. I'm not sure on the cost of an qualitative urine test- probably around $60.xx if memory serves at quest. The rest will run you around $200.00 a month.

Accutane leaves your system after 30 days of ceasing treatment, so the results, which are undeniably awesome, can sometimes return, it depends on the individual patient. It does physically shrink sebaceous glands, so unless you are also experiencing hormonal imbalances that stimulate the enlargement of those glands- the results should last for years. I recommend birth control if you are female, because it controls estrogen/testosterone balance, during a female's cycle, the hormonal cause of breakout is DHT (dihydrotestosterone). It drives oil production. Birth control artificially regulates estrogen levels (estrogen is converted into Testosterone/DHT in the body of both males & females. I'd highly recommend not wasting your money on topicals, whereas they can provide results- they do not even attempt to fix the ultimate problem.

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Guest beccau08

Well that's expensive but not as bad as I was imagining, still can't afford it either way.

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Some of the info in this thread is simply untrue.

So, I know for a fact that they will not/ should not prescribe you accutane right off the bat unless it's like super omega severe... Accutane is unfortunately a temporary fix. 1 in 4 get acne again which seems ridiculous when a possible side effect could be blindness. retin-A is a topical version of accutane anywho they are both synthetic derivatives of vitamin A.

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Some of the info in this thread is simply untrue.

So, I know for a fact that they will not/ should not prescribe you accutane right off the bat unless it's like super omega severe... Accutane is unfortunately a temporary fix. 1 in 4 get acne again which seems ridiculous when a possible side effect could be blindness. retin-A is a topical version of accutane anywho they are both synthetic derivatives of vitamin A.

1. Retin-A is not a topical version of Accutane. Tretinoin and isotretinoin are different, just because they're retinoids doesn't mean they're the same thing. They work totally differently; Retin-A increases cell turnover and boosts collagen production... we're not sure exactly what Accutane does, but it's understood that it kills off sebum production. Topical isotretinoin does exist, though.

2. Accutane is as close to a permanent fix as we have, and only about 40% see total remission. About 80% altogether see either total remission or significantly lessened acne.

3. The odds of Accutane causing blindness are close to nil. Afaik the only way it can happen is if brain swelling occurs and is left unattended to.

Here's my advice to you: LIE! Everybody lies, so just do it. Tell your soon-to-be dermatologist that you have been on ...<insert list here>... I could send you the list I used, but it is pretty dramatic in that it includes every topical (on-label) for acne. I'd also lie and say that I had been on Minocycline or Tetracycline (look up dosages if you want to be more accurate and seem easily convincing).

This is really shitty advice, and most (sane) people actually don't lie to doctors about what medications they've taken, but anyways...

The only truly worrisome side effect (that isn't simply annoying) is teratogenicity.

Very untrue. There are lots of long-term side effects that Accutane may cause, and people considering the drug have to take that into account. Even though they're rare, things such as IBD, UC, decreased night vision, chronic back or joint pain, etc. can all change the way someone lives their life for the worse. Hence the fears surrounding Accutane.

You're referring to stigma. You do not know my resume nor do you understand the mechanism of action behind any of the potential side effects you just listed. My advice holds true if you want Accutane without going through a deluge of topicals that scientifically are less effective. As far as the person who mentions brain swelling due to Hydrocephalus, that is inaccurate. Vitamin-A and it's derivates risk Pseudotumor Cerebri secondary to medication...(in this case Accutane). The most common drug causing PTC is Minocycline. It simply is increased intracranial pressure for which obesity is also a predisposing factor. It is not clear whether it is due to increases production of Cerebrospinal Fluid or the decreased reabsorption. CSF then protrudes into the optic chiasm where the optic nerve is located risking papilledema. This happens due to all factors and idiopathic reasons in less than 20/100,000 people.

Please stop turning off potential users by spouting prescription pamphlets, commercials, and crap you've read. The truth is if any of these side effects were common, the drugs FDA approval would have been revoked somewhere throughout its long term on the U.S. market. The dogma thats arisen in the last decade is due to the lawsuit happy times we live in. Yes, a patient should be aware of potential side effects, but no physician would Iskenderun prescribing it if these happened even 1% of the time. Opioids are waaaay more dangerous and harmful, as are antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and acetomenaphin which in nominal doses 100% for certain causes liver damage. Lay off the Isotretinoin bash wagon. There are risk to all medications and substances ingested.

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Lay off the Isotretinoin bash wagon. There are risk to all medications and substances ingested.

Woah, woah, woah, all I did was point out known possible side effects, I'm not on the "isotretinoin bash wagon". Note that I'm on the drug, if I were that opposed to Accutane I wouldn't be taking it. I'm well aware that all medications have their risks... the point was that Accutane has serious risks, and you're playing them off like they don't exist.

The truth is if any of these side effects were common, the drugs FDA approval would have been revoked somewhere throughout its long term on the U.S. market.

Hence why I said, "Even though [the severe side effects] are rare," right?

Please stop turning off potential users by spouting prescription pamphlets, commercials, and crap you've read.

I'm not. I'm on Accutane, I studied the drug long and hard before I agreed to take it. That means I ran into some anecdotes, yes, but I realize plenty well that the internet is a haven for sensationalism and we live in a sue-happy country, you don't need to tell me about it. There are studies validating a correlation between Accutane and UC, IBD, premature bone fusage (stunted growth), etc. The fairly recent Penn study found that Accutane users are over 4x more likely to get UC. (Before you say it, yes, I realize one study is not a confirmation, I'm just mentioning something I know and doesn't come from a pamphlet/a commercial/crap, as you said.) You mentioned something along the lines of "if any of the worst side effects happened even 1% of the time, no derm would prescribe it." That's one way to look at it, but not the only way. My derm explained to me that the correlation between Chron's and Accutane, for example, is suspect, but studies have suggested that it may double the odds. If 1 in 10,000 people typically has Chron's, it becomes 1 in 5,000 w/ Accutane... good odds? Some may say so, others may not, given the severity of the disease. Also, just because a number of anecdotes aren't scientifically validated doesn't mean they're worthless... if there are X number of people all saying the same thing, at some point you ought to listen, eh?

My advice holds true if you want Accutane without going through a deluge of topicals that scientifically are less effective.

I'm not saying it won't work, I'm saying it's dumb to lie to doctors about medications you've taken. It's only a small minority of people with acne that has to resort to Accutane, yet here you are suggesting to someone, over the internet, that has never seen a derm and whose acne you've never seen, that they tell their derm they've taken every acne medication in the books. IF someone wants to go for Accutane, sure, they can lie all they want, but they ought to be aware of potential side effects, which is why I came in the thread. Seriously, though, if you're thick enough to not admit that that piece of advice was objectively rash, there's not much point in me sitting here and typing this.

You do not know my resume nor do you understand the mechanism of action behind any of the potential side effects you just listed.

That's true, but I don't need to if they're scientifically supported. What's more, does anyone? Does anyone know what it is about Accutane that leads it to increased odds of IBD, bone fusage, and what not? This isn't rhetorical, I just seriously don't know.

I think we agree a lot more than you think we do, man. You told me, "Lay off the Isotretinoin bash wagon," though... I'm going to suggest you lay off the bandwagon. Accutane is a serious medicine... as it often works, increased odds of success = increased odds of side effects. It's completely reasonable to try other, less worrisome meds beforehand, and it's of course reasonable to be wary w/ regards to what the drug can do to you in the long term. Just because the medicine has had a very largely positive influence and you're a complete supporter of it (I am, too) doesn't mean you have to excuse objections to the medication as uninformed pamphlet trash.

Edited by ===

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