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PrettyInside

A Foolish Question: Does Insurance *ever* Cover Scar Treatment?

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I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of insurance covering (or partially covering) treatment(s) for indented scarring?

My guess is that all insurance providers label such treatment(s) as "cosmetic," but, to my mind, it's a means of fixing damage that was caused by a medical condition; for that reason, treatment should be covered, or largely covered, by insurance.

Thanks,

P.I.

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Depends what county you live in....

In the Netherlands it is covered if my dermatologist finds it necessary. This is how I am trying to get my Recell treatment covered.

You should call your health insurence.

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In the Netherlands it is covered if my dermatologist finds it necessary. This is how I am trying to get my Recell treatment covered.

This news doesn't surprise me, though I'm not in the Netherlands. I'm curious: how does a dermatologist determine when scar treatment is "necessary" for a patient? I ask because what really matters, IMO, is the patients' psychological outlook on his/her appearance. Minor scars might not upset one person much, but may nearly cripple another person who's fearful to show his/her skin in public.

You should call your health insurence.

I plan to do so but fear I know what the answer will be.

If you live in U.S, I don't think so...every doctors I asked, they all told me "Insurance does NOT cover for this treatment"...neutral.gif

That's what I'm expecting to be told by doctors and my insurance provider, since I am in the U.S. And I think it's a cryin' shame--and an example of insurance companies cheating us--since most of us pay a monthly fee to even have insurance. I mean, how is receiving treatment for acne scars any different than receiving coverage to treat damage caused by another medical condition? (Did you follow that? LOL)

P.I.

Edited by PrettyInside

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I'm wondering if anyone has ever heard of insurance covering (or partially covering) treatment(s) for indented scarring?

My guess is that all insurance providers label such treatment(s) as "cosmetic," but, to my mind, it's a means of fixing damage that was caused by a medical condition; for that reason, treatment should be covered, or largely covered, by insurance.

Thanks,

P.I.

If you live in the good ole USA, then NO! Insurance will not cover any "cosmetic" procedure. God Bless America and Viva La Capitalism!

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If you live in the good ole USA, then NO! Insurance will not cover any "cosmetic" procedure.

And that's the precise problem: labeling the treatment of skin damage as "cosmetic." To my mind, a cosmetic procedure is changing a feature with which you're born. Fixing damage that resulted from a medical ailment should not be labeled "cosmetic." How convenient for the insurance companies, eh?

Guess I should feel reassured by the knowledge that if my face were to be mangled from a car accident, then insurance would cover treatment for the skin damage. *eye roll*

P.I.

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Big difference between disfigurement and acne scarring.

My response to that is "yes" and "no." Realistically, yes. But some people are so distraught over acne scarring, that it creates emotional/psychological barriers in his/her life. If someone isn't living life--is avoiding any circumstances in an effort to hide from loved ones and the public at large--I think insurance should help cover his/her scar treatment.

I realize that writing as much on this site isn't going to change the minds of the powers that be at the insurance companies. Heh... I'll stop venting now.

P.I.

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But then wher do we stop? My insurance doesn't cover the (not scarring) surgeries I require because they're 'cosmetic', (one more-so than the other, which arguably isn't at all, but whatever), but they check all your boxes. They can't just dole out money to whoever feels bad about themselves, it's too easy to fake/exaggerate how much X feature depresses you, so you can get a free ride. It's just bad business.

If someone dislikes the fully-functioning nose with which s/he is born, yes, changing it would be a true cosmetic procedure. But I still contend that if skin is damaged by a medical condition--causing an alteration to its original form--it should at least be partially covered by insurance. (Per another poster's response, it seems that Norway, at least, is on the same wavelength.)

We will have to agree to disagree on this one. smile.png

P.I.

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What about GRS and FFS? Transsexualism is also a medical condition, no? Fully functioning, nothing altered or damaged, just a mismatch. What then? tongue.png

I feel like we're discussing two entirely different issues that are taking us way off-topic; so this will be my last post in this (my) thread, unless someone else has something to add regarding medical coverage--full or partial--for acne-scar treatment.

I view transsexualism as a whole 'nuther animal that's unrelated to this thread. But I'll say this much: since most transsexuals can't/don't claim that their, erm, body parts malfunction, I think that insurance providers can could argue against coverage for a sex-change operation. Now if that person were born with a malfunctioning, erm, body part--or if it were damaged due to an accident--I think insurance should defray the cost to correct the issue.

I'm talking about a body part being damaged due to a medical condition. If I get a scar--even a very minor one--from a dog bite, I believe that treatment for the scar would be covered by insurance. So why not provide coverage--or at least partial coverage--for scarring caused by a medical condition that is, for many of us, out of our complete control?

P.I.

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i wish it's covered by insurance because it caused by acne skin problem which is covered by insurance...=(...sometimes a derm gives you a cream, and it doesn't work and makes your skin worse....causes scarring...then what...? it doesn't make sense to me...eusa_sick.gif ...health care in this country(U.S) is ridiculous, too...eusa_snooty.gif

Edited by myskin2012

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i wish it's covered by insurance because it caused by acne skin problem which is covered by insurance...=(...sometimes a derm gives you a cream, and it doesn't work and makes your skin worse....causes scarring...then what...? it doesn't make sense to me...eusa_sick.gif ...health care in this country(U.S) is ridiculous, too...eusa_snooty.gif

You've hit upon my very point; so I couldn't agree more. smile.png

If I had a heart condition, my insurance would help cover treatment--medical exams, tests, and medications--for it. And if I developed damage to my heart as a result of that medical condition--in spite of the best medical care--my insurance also would help defray the cost of fixing my heart. The insurance company wouldn't, in a sense, blame me for the damage done and reject my medical claims.

Yet when it comes to acne, insurance providers don't help cover the cost of the damage done. And to my mind, damage done by a medical condition--even one that we happen to "wear on the outside"--doesn't make it solely "cosmetic."

P.I.

Edited by PrettyInside

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