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I Am A Diabetic, How Does Insulin Affect Acne?

Im 15, been a diabetic since a young age. My bacne and face acne has become pretty bad. I was wondering does insulin affect my acne and how could i help it?

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Type 1 or Type 2?

Fluctuating blood sugar has been associated with acne based on anecdotal testimonies, though I don't believe there have been any studies on the exact effects of insulin on acne. Unfortunately, it's a poorly researched area, but I assume with the variety of bodily systems (immune, endocrine, etc.) diabetes affects, acne can no doubt result.

Keep in mind, at 15, it's not much a surprise you have acne. Everyone does. It's not necessarily a symptom of diabetes as much as one of adolescence. Wash your face twice daily, apply a medicated topical (OTC or prescription), and follow suit with a moisturizer (day and night).

Good luck. Diabetes can be a pain to manage, but hopefully you can lead a relatively normal life in spite of it.

Edited by nomit

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It's thought that Insulin affects skin by increasing sebum production and increasing skin shedding rate, which definitely affects skin. Given the amount of sugars and simple carbs in our diet, when we are younger, hypoglycemia, or excess insulin is the case with most, as insulin resistance develops. The worse the insulin resistance, the more insulin that must be produced to take care of the blood sugar, and therefore the worse the acne will be. Insulin affects other hormones as well, as seen in women with PCOS who have insulin resistance, and start developing more male characteristics. So it makes sense that acne would be more likely in the pubertal years than adulthood because hormones are already raging during this time so excess insulin will have a greater effect on the hormones that cause acne. There is a study as well that found a direct link between higher insulin resistance once puberty started and during puberty, and lowering after puberty. Given that insulin is an extremely powerful hormone, it is possible that when insulin is less sensitive than it needs to be, these excess levels and highs and lows of blood sugar levels can really cause problems.

Controlling insulin spikes and maintaining insulin sensitivity may be the best possible way to control acne.

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It's thought that Insulin affects skin by increasing sebum production and increasing skin shedding rate, which definitely affects skin. Given the amount of sugars and simple carbs in our diet, when we are younger, hypoglycemia, or excess insulin is the case with most, as insulin resistance develops. The worse the insulin resistance, the more insulin that must be produced to take care of the blood sugar, and therefore the worse the acne will be. Insulin affects other hormones as well, as seen in women with PCOS who have insulin resistance, and start developing more male characteristics. So it makes sense that acne would be more likely in the pubertal years than adulthood because hormones are already raging during this time so excess insulin will have a greater effect on the hormones that cause acne. There is a study as well that found a direct link between higher insulin resistance once puberty started and during puberty, and lowering after puberty. Given that insulin is an extremely powerful hormone, it is possible that when insulin is less sensitive than it needs to be, these excess levels and highs and lows of blood sugar levels can really cause problems.

Controlling insulin spikes and maintaining insulin sensitivity may be the best possible way to control acne.

IGF (insulin-like growth factor) and androgen are the main hormones associated with sebum production and cellular proliferation; I have yet to find a scientifically sound article that affirms the role of insulin in the pathology of acne.

Hormones (particularly so androgen) fluctuate naturally during puberty; there is nothing pathological about this. It's a process that occurs in just about every human being, though to what extent is highly subjective. In this manner, while insulin resistance may change, that does not invariably assign a correlation between insulin and acne (or even sebum production); too many other hormones are fluctuating in their levels, as well. That, and there are far more adults with no (or very minimal) insulin resistance that still present with acne than there are those who have high tolerance to the hormone (who also have acne).

Though maintaining steady levels of insulin (and inherently, glucose) is vital for diabetics (and to a lesser extent, all humans), that does not mean it will cure every problem known to man, or acne. Healthy diets do wonders for a person's health, and, when a calorie deficit is introduced, acne has been shown to be improved, but they are not a universal cure for acne, nor do they provide a conclusive explanation to its pathology.

Edited by nomit

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I have yet to find a scientifically sound article that affirms the role of insulin in the pathology of acne.

.

How about Dr Cordain, who Dan actually interviews with on this website? He doesn't say insulin plays the role, because "studies must confirm this." Why is it that a few thousand people he observed had no acne whatsoever? They go through puberty as well. Not to mention, nothing about acne is "normal." It is, however, your bodies normal reaction to something being wrong in the body, not to the "normal" hormonal fluctuation from puberty.

Caloric deficit alone doesn't cure acne because it doesn't improve insulin's sensitivity, it simply reduces insulin's production as there is less to be taken care of. I could lower my calorie intake 1000 calories, but if i eat nothing but high-sugar foods, my acne isn't going to get better. And vice-versa, many people can continue there terrible diets once an insulin-sensitizing supplement is added. For instance, I tried diets a few times that made acne better until my body was used to the caloric load, at which point my acne came back. However, now that I take a chromium supplement, I don't have anxiety, my blood sugar levels are stable, and I eat worse than before. Not mention my acne has cleared up almost completely....

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I have yet to find a scientifically sound article that affirms the role of insulin in the pathology of acne.

.

How about Dr Cordain, who Dan actually interviews with on this website? He doesn't say insulin plays the role, because "studies must confirm this." Why is it that a few thousand people he observed had no acne whatsoever? They go through puberty as well. Not to mention, nothing about acne is "normal." It is, however, your bodies normal reaction to something being wrong in the body, not to the "normal" hormonal fluctuation from puberty.

Caloric deficit alone doesn't cure acne because it doesn't improve insulin's sensitivity, it simply reduces insulin's production as there is less to be taken care of. I could lower my calorie intake 1000 calories, but if i eat nothing but high-sugar foods, my acne isn't going to get better. And vice-versa, many people can continue there terrible diets once an insulin-sensitizing supplement is added. For instance, I tried diets a few times that made acne better until my body was used to the caloric load, at which point my acne came back. However, now that I take a chromium supplement, I don't have anxiety, my blood sugar levels are stable, and I eat worse than before. Not mention my acne has cleared up almost completely....

Anecdotal evidence is, as any doctor will tell you, never a reliable manner of measuring a biological process. The placebo effect is a powerful one, and patients are hardly free of bias when it comes to their treatment.

Acne is a pathological mystery. We know excessive sebum production and abnormal proliferation play some sort of role in it - this is undisputed. What's foggy is the cause of these pathologies, a very controversial topic within the dermatologic community. To that end, scientists have yet to divine an accurate, unifying hypothesis that is true universally, and is hopefully treatable.

Science is a process. It's rigid, it's critical, and it's meant to be free of personal bias (at worst, the bias should be disclosed). Conclusions are drawn through meta-analysis of multiple, well-structured studies that assert with certainty the theory of the conducting scientist. Patient-documented reports have their place (for instance, it's often used in the psychiatric community), but can't be used effectively when testing a physical event (I hope that makes sense - it's getting late sleep.png ). That's why we use sebum meters to measure sebum production, not the interpretation of a participant on a scale of 1-10.

Myself, I believe in science. I think it's as close as we as a species will ever get to fully understanding the world around us, and that it promotes collaboration and unity to solve challenging problems. Others think science is a source of bias, greed, and plain deception. That's fine! To a degree, they're right. The scientific community is incredibly broad, and there will no doubt be some bad apples in the batch.

Back to the topic at hand (sorry for that little rant). Insulin, based on currently available studies, doesn't play a role in acne - at least not as far as dermatology is concerned (at this time). This is a fact, at this time. If you feel this opinion is made in error, and you feel there's potential in this theory, call up your local university, go to medical school for 7 years, fund the study, conduct the study, and announce your results - good, or bad.

Calorie deficits have been shown to reduce acne. More specifically, the study (or studies?) that concluded such (I don't have it on hand right now - maybe in the morning) examined popular, healthy, nutritional diets (i.e. paleo) and their effect on acne (I believe it was over 8 weeks). They reported modest improvement compared to the control group, but noted that no one "goal" (dairy-free, glucose-free, etc.) seemed to achieve clearance. Instead, they found that the factor all these diets share is a healthy caloric deficit. Their conclusion was, rightfully so, in my opinion, to cautiously assert to the possibility of weight-loss influencing acne.

I, personally, haven't experienced any success with diet - and I'd like to say I'm rather meticulous in my treatments. I'm overjoyed for those who do experience clearance with dietary changes alone (as I am for those who achieve clearance through medication), but, as with my own success, I don't believe in preaching or making unfounded (more accurately, scientifically unfounded) conclusions.

Recommendations, opinions, and observations are great as long as their held in perspective.

I hope the above rambling isn't too dysfunctional, and that it doesn't come off as rude (that was never my intention). Like I said, it's late, and I'm a little tired. smile.png

Edited by nomit

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Im 15, been a diabetic since a young age. My bacne and face acne has become pretty bad. I was wondering does insulin affect my acne and how could i help it?

http://www.celiac.co...toms/Page1.html

Know that all food sensitivities, not just Celiac Disease (which is Gluten Sensitivity) can cause illnesses. There is just more info out there for Gluten.

http://www.ncbi.nlm..../pubmed/8420586

This is about Soybean Sensitivity causing Asthma. My 8 year olds Asthma was caused by Gluten Sensitivity. When Food Sensitivity is eliminated, so is Asthma.

Ps Acne & Diabetes are both symptoms of Food Sensitivity

PPS http://www.hope4diabetes.info/our-program/nutritional-counseling/food-allergies.html

What I find funny is how this link states that Gluten Sensitivity is the only Food Sensitivity that can not cause Diabetes. Yet Gluten Sensitivity (Celiac Disease) list Diabetes as a symptom. Go figure.

Edited by kidego

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I have yet to find a scientifically sound article that affirms the role of insulin in the pathology of acne.

.

How about Dr Cordain, who Dan actually interviews with on this website? He doesn't say insulin plays the role, because "studies must confirm this." Why is it that a few thousand people he observed had no acne whatsoever? They go through puberty as well. Not to mention, nothing about acne is "normal." It is, however, your bodies normal reaction to something being wrong in the body, not to the "normal" hormonal fluctuation from puberty.

Caloric deficit alone doesn't cure acne because it doesn't improve insulin's sensitivity, it simply reduces insulin's production as there is less to be taken care of. I could lower my calorie intake 1000 calories, but if i eat nothing but high-sugar foods, my acne isn't going to get better. And vice-versa, many people can continue there terrible diets once an insulin-sensitizing supplement is added. For instance, I tried diets a few times that made acne better until my body was used to the caloric load, at which point my acne came back. However, now that I take a chromium supplement, I don't have anxiety, my blood sugar levels are stable, and I eat worse than before. Not mention my acne has cleared up almost completely....

Anecdotal evidence is, as any doctor will tell you, never a reliable manner of measuring a biological process. The placebo effect is a powerful one, and patients are hardly free of bias when it comes to their treatment.

Acne is a pathological mystery. While we know excessive sebum production and abnormal proliferation play some sort of role in it - this is undisputed. What's foggy is the cause of these pathologies, a very controversial topic within the dermatologic community. To that end, scientists have yet to divine an accurate, unifying hypothesis that is true universally, and is hopefully treatable.

Science is a process. It's rigid, it's critical, and it's meant to be free of personal bias (at worst, the bias should be disclosed). Conclusions are drawn through meta-analysis of multiple, well-structured studies that assert with certainty the theory of the conducting scientist. Patient-documented reports have their place (for instance, it's often used in the psychiatric community), but can't be used effectively when testing a physical event (I hope that makes sense - it's getting late sleep.png ). That's why we use sebum meters to measure sebum production, not the interpretation of a participant on a scale of 1-10.

Myself, I believe in science. I think it's as close as we as a species will ever get to fully understanding the world around us, and that it promotes collaboration and unity to solve challenging problems. Others think science is a source of bias, greed, and plain deception. That's fine! To a degree, they're right. The scientific community is incredibly broad, and there will no doubt be some bad apples in the batch.

Back to the topic at hand (sorry for that little rant). Insulin, based on currently available studies, doesn't play a role in acne - at least not as far as dermatology is concerned (at this time). This is a fact, at this time. If you feel this opinion is made in error, and you feel there's potential in this theory, call up your local university, go to medical school for 7 years, fund the study, conduct the study, and announce your results - good, or bad.

Calorie deficits have been shown to reduce acne. More specifically, the study (or studies?) that concluded such (I don't have it on hand right now - maybe in the morning) examined popular, healthy, nutritional diets (i.e. paleo) and their effect on acne (I believe it was over 8 weeks). They reported modest improvement compared to the control group, but noted that no one "goal" (dairy-free, glucose-free, etc.) seemed to achieve clearance. Instead, they found that the factor all these diets share is a healthy caloric deficit. Their conclusion was, rightfully so, in my opinion, to cautiously assert to the possibility of weight-loss influencing acne.

I, personally, haven't experienced any success with diet - and I'd like to say I'm rather meticulous in my treatments. I'm overjoyed for those who do experience clearance with dietary changes alone (as I am for those who achieve clearance through medication), but, as with my own success, I don't believe in preaching or making unfounded (more accurately, scientifically unfounded) conclusions.

Recommendations, opinions, and observations are great as long as their held in perspective.

I hope the above rambling isn't too dysfunctional, and that it doesn't come off as rude (that'd never be my intention). Like I said, it's late, and I'm a little tired. smile.png

I understand it's not proven. Scientific studies take years and years to prove something. When it comes to acne, it makes sense that nothing has been proven, because the funding doesn't go out to the correct studies and the government can, if it wants to, add small things into studies that change the results in order to hide truth from the public. For instance, the study that says marijuana kills brain cells. It took years and years for people just to figure out the reason that marijuana killed brain cells was because the monkeys were suffocated with an entire day's worth of marijuana smoke in 5 minutes, and that it was actually the lack of oxygen that resulted in the loss of brain cells. Makes sense that it will take as long as it possibly can for an honest, scientifically proven cure for acne to be revealed, given that acne brings in absurd amounts of money annually. It is, after all, the most common disease in existence in our country. That's why you must rely on current studies, scientific reasoning, personal experience, and others' experiences to come up with a belief and then preach it to others in order to offer some assistance and insight. I've done extreme amounts of research, which allowed me to come to the conclusion, in my opinion, that insulin is the main cause of acne. I'm not going to sit around and wait for proof that might not come for 5, 10, or even 20 years, when I feel I can logically provide an explanation and solution to the problem. Regardless of whether I'm wrong or right, I'll be ecstatic either way when a solution to this epidemic problem is proven through scientific research, because that will mean many people in the future won't suffer through years of their life like myself and many others have. Until that time, I'll continue to research and further develop my opinion in hopes of helping even just one person cure their acne.

P.S. Neither rude, nor dysfunctional. Haha

Edited by Jal V

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