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DanTheMan123

Does Moisturizing Help Reduce Oil Or Vice-Versa?

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I believe so, depending on the state of your skin.

If you find your skin has a thick layer of oil on top of dry feeling skin, then once a moisturizer soothes your skin, the oil should soon sway away.

While science has not entirely proved it either way, there are a TON of people who've had success by merely being more gentle with their skin, abandoning harsh cleansers, washing with something gentle, perhaps even water only (or nothing at all), and many who've had success using a great skin healing moisturizer like CeraVe, or something simple like Avocado oil, which has many skin soothing and acne aiding abilities.

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Hello...

Yes,moisturizing decreases oil on the face and has proven to be very helpful for oily skin if used in right way.

Homemade or herbal moisturizer are more good to use for any kind of skin.

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Hello...

Yes,moisturizing decreases oil on the face and has proven to be very helpful for oily skin if used in right way.

Homemade or herbal moisturizer are more good to use for any kind of skin.

I just started simply rinsing with water and a gentle wet cloth, then applying a small amount of avocado oil.

So I guess I'll see how that goes.

Supposedly Avacado's one of the best for oily skin, and skin repair?

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Must always moisturise. Also it is important to get the right product for your skin type. Normally for oil skin types, you sould generally look for gel type, lightweight, quick absorbing moisturisers which give a matted finish :).

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Yes,moisturizing decreases oil on the face and has proven to be very helpful for oily skin if used in right way.

Moisturizing has no effect on the production of sebum; at least, none that I know of. I don't see any plausible explanation for how that could happen, considering that the activity of sebaceous glands is strongly dependent on androgenic activity, not water. For evidence against that general idea (moisture supposedly decreasing sebum production), here's a repeat of something I posted several years ago, under the title "Does sebum help 'moisturize' the skin??" (look at the final paragraph in which they compared levels of moisture in skin with its oiliness, and found no connection):

Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 1987 Mar;88(3 Suppl):2s-6s.

"Skin lipids: an update"

Downing DT, Stewart ME, Wertz PW, Colton SW, Abraham W, Strauss JS.

(excerpt from this study follows below, including the references...)

Sebum and Dry Skin "...skin can be healthy and have charming cosmetic properties in the virtual absence of sebum." (14)

Kligman drew attention to prepubertal children, who produce almost no sebum, to support his thesis that skin does not depend upon sebum for maintaining its barrier to water loss: "...there can be no doubt of the insignificance of sebum as a waterproofing material." (14) Our recent studies at the other end of the human age spectrum have supported this conviction. In a survey of sebum secretion rates and the incidence of dry skin among subjects aged 65 to 97, no correlation was found between sebaceous gland activity and the presence or severity of dry skin (34). Kligman recognized that sebum could mask the scaliness of dry skin without producing any actual change in the condition: "Sebum, like any oil, has some emollient or smoothing effect when a sufficient quantity is rubbed into dry, scaling skin." (14) In spite of the clear inference to be drawn from the cutaneous characteristics of children and the experimental data obtained from the elderly, it remains difficult to dispel the myth that low sebum secretion rates cause dry skin. It is a rare individual who realizes that "dry" is not the obverse of "oily".

(14) Kligman AM: The uses of sebum. Br J Dermatol 75: 307-319, 1963

(34) Frantz RA, Kinney CK, Downing DT: A study of skin dryness in the elderly. Nursing Res 35: 98-100, 1986.

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I've NEVER been able to find a moisturiser that helps the sebum production of my skin. Not even the ones that are specifically made for my skin type (extremely oily, sensitive etc). I've studied Beauty Therapy for a few years at college and was always advised to wear a moisturiser for my skin type but personally I've never found it to be any good for my skin. I don't and won't use anything on my skin that "strips" natural oils from my skin, I cleanse with oatmeal which actually provides a little moisture, so I just think I don't need to apply more moisture via moisturiser as my skin produces more than enough moisture.

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From personal experience, moisterizing more did noticably decrease sebum production. I wash my face once a day at night so this is when I moisterize. I used to only use about a pearl sized amount of moisterizer but when I tripled the amount, the next day, my face was a lot less oily. My skin used to get shiny after only 1-2 hours and if I left it alone, by the end of the day, it was an utter oil slick. There was so much it would get in my eyes and burn. Now that I moisterize more, it is no where near as oily as before. I still have oily skin but I would say the amount has decreased by about a half. It's a lot more manageable now.

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...Now that I moisterize more, it is no where near as oily as before. I still have oily skin but I would say the amount has decreased by about a half. It's a lot more manageable now.

Rather than simply claim that it has decreased "by about a half", I'd be far more likely to believe your estimate if you would test it scientifically with Sebutape Skin Indicators. That's a small square of a special plastic material that you press against your skin for five seconds; when you remove it afterwards, it shows small dark spots in the plastic that correspond to tiny sebum droplets. The more dark spots, the more sebum! It's consistent, and works like a champ!

The last time I checked a couple of years ago, they cost about 40 cents apiece (about $40 for a roll of 100 Skin Indicators). I know that may sound expensive to you, but you would be doing an invaluable service to all the people who read this forum if you could see your way to buying a roll of these things, and checking your claim scientifically (Sebutape Test Strips and Skin Indicators are the same things used by doctors and scientists during serious scientific studies). You'll be the only person (besides me) ever to do a serious test using Sebutape Skin Indicators, and post the results right here on acne.org!! Wouldn't THAT be really cool?? smile.png

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Again I see this bryan person giving false information, I hope the moderators ban this guy. If your skin is tight feeling after you wash, yes moisterizer will help lower the oil production. Will you see a change overnight? no. Many people are expecting instant results, and im sorry to tell you, when combating oil production it takes quite a while to fix. Have patience.

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Again I see this bryan person giving false information, I hope the moderators ban this guy. If your skin is tight feeling after you wash, yes moisterizer will help lower the oil production. Will you see a change overnight? no. Many people are expecting instant results, and im sorry to tell you, when combating oil production it takes quite a while to fix. Have patience.

Before you embarrass yourself further by talking about things you know nothing about, I strongly suggest again (like I did a few moments ago in another thread) that you put your own skin to a scientific test, and then post your results here for all of us to see. "Put up, or shut up", as the saying goes. razz.gif

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Again I see this bryan person giving false information, I hope the moderators ban this guy. If your skin is tight feeling after you wash, yes moisterizer will help lower the oil production. Will you see a change overnight? no. Many people are expecting instant results, and im sorry to tell you, when combating oil production it takes quite a while to fix. Have patience.

Before you embarrass yourself further by talking about things you know nothing about, I strongly suggest again (like I did a few moments ago in another thread) that you put your own skin to a scientific test, and then post your results here for all of us to see. "Put up, or shut up", as the saying goes. razz.gif

I'm glad you're still around and continuing to try to fight the misconceptions about oil production. People just assume oil production is a regulated response by the body because of local dryness, but as you know, it ABSOLUTELY IS NOT. It is regulated by HORMONES, which themselves are not influenced directly or indirectly by dryness. Thus, moisturizing will certainly not reduce oil production. And you're right that it would be great if people who claim otherwise would actually use oil-detecting strips to quantify the oil production.

Not that I claim to be an absolute expert on the subject...but I do have a little knowledge on these things at least, given that I'm a third year medical student.

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Thanks so much for your excellent comments, "flyinsoup"! It's the comments from sane people like yourself that keep me going! smile.png

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Again I see this bryan person giving false information, I hope the moderators ban this guy. If your skin is tight feeling after you wash, yes moisterizer will help lower the oil production. Will you see a change overnight? no. Many people are expecting instant results, and im sorry to tell you, when combating oil production it takes quite a while to fix. Have patience.

Before you embarrass yourself further by talking about things you know nothing about, I strongly suggest again (like I did a few moments ago in another thread) that you put your own skin to a scientific test, and then post your results here for all of us to see. "Put up, or shut up", as the saying goes. razz.gif

Things I dont know about? Ive spend the last 3 years of my life dealing with this. My case was so extreme doctors had no clue, so I was left to myself to fix the problem. Every medication they gave me only irritated and dried out my skin causing the oil production to increase. Further more the only reason my skin was oily in the first place was going from washing once per day, to 3 times perday.

Misery loves company, so its not surprising someone like you would try to cause problems for other people with false information.

Again I see this bryan person giving false information, I hope the moderators ban this guy. If your skin is tight feeling after you wash, yes moisterizer will help lower the oil production. Will you see a change overnight? no. Many people are expecting instant results, and im sorry to tell you, when combating oil production it takes quite a while to fix. Have patience.

Before you embarrass yourself further by talking about things you know nothing about, I strongly suggest again (like I did a few moments ago in another thread) that you put your own skin to a scientific test, and then post your results here for all of us to see. "Put up, or shut up", as the saying goes. razz.gif

I'm glad you're still around and continuing to try to fight the misconceptions about oil production. People just assume oil production is a regulated response by the body because of local dryness, but as you know, it ABSOLUTELY IS NOT. It is regulated by HORMONES, which themselves are not influenced directly or indirectly by dryness. Thus, moisturizing will certainly not reduce oil production. And you're right that it would be great if people who claim otherwise would actually use oil-detecting strips to quantify the oil production.

Not that I claim to be an absolute expert on the subject...but I do have a little knowledge on these things at least, given that I'm a third year medical student.

I find it appauling that people like you are allowed to even post on here. A 3rd year medical student wouldn't have even started learning about this. You have completed 26% of your schooling, and that doesnt even include the 4 more years you need to specialize in something of this nature. So in reality you don't know jack.

Im speaking from real life experience. Not 100 year old medical studies with questionable motives. On top of it there are hundreds of people who speak from real life experiences as well who will say the same thing as I have.

There is no doubt that sebum production is affected by the moisture content of your skin. Anyone who says otherwise is a fool or naive.

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And to bryan, you post count, and your activity on this forum shows that you clearly are still searching for answers, as in you have no clue what you are doing or talking about.

And to others looking for answers, do you trust the person still searching or the person who has found a solution. The answer is clear. I solved my problem with oil, without taking accutaine, and I had said I would let the people here know how I did so if I ever did because I know what its like.

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That really depends on what (else) is formulated into the moisturizer. There are a few topical ingredients that can reduce the amount of sebum excreted ie transported to the surface of the skin from the " sebum reservoir" and have other beneficial properties without being too harsh on your skin. One such example seems to be niacinamide (vitamin B3) that is being increasingly formulated into leave-on products from P&G. Many, if not most, moisturizers from Olay and some moisturizers and after-shave balms from Gillette have a decent amount included. It has also been found that ketoconazole, the active ingredient of Nizoral shampoo, decreases the amount of sebum excreted.

However, research is still lacking in the field of sebum excretion rate when using a regular, light moisturizer after washing your face vs simply washing your face and not using a moisturizer afterwords. Either way, your skin will eventually (after a few hours) become "greasy" again. No amount of plain old moisturizer will make more/less sebum come out nor will any amount of washing make more/less sebum come out.

Sebum, following its synthesis, is stored in the follicular reservoir. The sebum that comes out after you have washed your face comes from that reservoir, it is not being synthesized "on the fly" and then being quickly pushed out to the top. Sebum excretion rate, however, is not always the same, it changes with the time of the day, the temperature/humidity around us etc. To learn more about this subject, I suggest you read this.

The only way of actually reducing sebum production involves messing around with hormones or retionoids.

Edited by derm77
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I find it appauling that people like you are allowed to even post on here. A 3rd year medical student wouldn't have even started learning about this. You have completed 26% of your schooling, and that doesnt even include the 4 more years you need to specialize in something of this nature. So in reality you don't know jack.

Im speaking from real life experience. Not 100 year old medical studies with questionable motives. On top of it there are hundreds of people who speak from real life experiences as well who will say the same thing as I have.

There is no doubt that sebum production is affected by the moisture content of your skin. Anyone who says otherwise is a fool or naive.

Appalling? Really? So is it typical for you to be appalled whenever someone does not agree with you?

And "questionable motives" surrounding medicine? Are you listening to yourself? You're making this too easy for me.

Please don't call into question my medical training. I stated firmly that I was not an expert, but that I do have some knowledge on the subject, and I stand by that. I can state with certainty that there are no known receptors on the skin that detect moisture--the kind of receptors that could provide negative feedback to oil production.

I'm not one for arguing over the internet b/c it will not change anything. If you want to prove your claims, treat only half your face with moisturizers/whatever products you use, and not the other. After a few weeks time, use the oil measuring strips that Bryan has used in the past to actually quantify the level of oil production on each side of your face. I'm positive it will be the same on both sides, but you disagree--so prove it. Note, however, that thus far no one has been able to substantiate similar claims with actual proof, so far as I've heard. This is the same argument that comes up again and again but that no one has ever actually proved objectively.

Keep in mind that a subjective assessment is inadequate, because it is possible oil is simply less visible on well-moisturized skin, which may actually be the phenomenon you have witnessed in the past (just one possible theory). Thus, an objective quantification with the oil-detecting strips is required to support your claims.

Good luck!

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