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betsy91

How Do You Calm Your Anxiety?

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I'm feeling so very anxious :( I went to sleep last night feeling that way and the whole night I felt just so very anxious. I would feel so mad too. Then I woke up this morning and still feel anxious... I want this feeling gone... It isn't only because of acne, it's other things too.... I'm constantly fighting with my sister and it's causing me anxiety as well too. I want to heal from this and I know it isn't good for your skin too. I just have this ugly feeling in my heart and I want it gone... Not only that but lately everything is bothering me. Little things too... It's so weird. What do you do that calms you down? Anything helps (:

I'll try watching a movie and drinking some chamomile. I'll probably will clean my room too to have an organized clean environment.

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I know exactly how you feel! I have had these feelings a lot this past year.

I'd say you should try and occupy yourself with things to do or surround yourself with people that will help you forget about it for a bit. Stuff like you mentioned, movies, doing chores, stuff that will keep you occupied and make you concentrate on other things. The same goes for people, the best way to forget about it I have found is just chilling out with my friends, you could talk to them about it if you want to, get their views on it and/or what you should do about it, or just hang out as normal. Similarly, you could take time out with your family to help with it too.

The biggest factor to stopping anxiety, for me at least, is time. It takes a while for these feelings to pass, but they will eventually (as your sig says!). I just try to be patient, to grin and bare it until it passes and do what I can to distract myself from thinking about it.

Good luck and remember it won't last forever smile.png

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i dont deal well with anxiety, i have a bad temper and it surfaces quick, and it causes me to break out more! so i have lots of ways to try and calm down, my best way is to go for a run with my music on LOUD, after a couple of km, i calm down my music volume is lowered and i can think. I also play piano for mild anxiety and i read a lot to distract myself

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I find it often depends on what's at the root of it, in terms how I respond and what things will help to ease it.

I've been working on anxiety in therapy recently and looking at what triggers it. I've found a few situations, usually involving meetings or appointments, which cause me to feel anxious. Add to that, I usually "relieve" that anxiety and tension by taking it out on my skin. Of course, that's the main problem at the heart of everything for me anyway, so my attempt at coping in fact only ends up making things so much worse. At the very least, that means I need to find a more appropriate coping mechanism and certainly one which isn't quite literally so harmful. Beyond that, it would be more productive for me to learn how to cope better in those situations which trigger my anxieties and insecurities to begin with.

Maybe that's something you could do. Take the situation with your sister for example: rather than trying to cope with the anxiety which comes from that situation, it will be better in the long run for all concerned, I imagine, if you get to the root of why you're at odds with your sister and why that seems to be a constant and reoccurring thing. It would be more productive to get to the heart of that and fix that, removing the anxiety as a result.

It's near impossible to, "just relax", as people are sometimes quite to suggest. I mean to "try" and relax implies that you're trying and you're putting effort and energy into it. That doesn't work because you're conscious of it and you move further away from switching off and truly relaxing. Anxiety serves a purpose in that it's usually there to make us more alert and to heighten our senses, making us more aware in order to prepare for something. It's usually something with negative connotations like a conflict or a threat. At best it would be some kind of challenge or task. It's like an energy and a form of adrenaline and it's best to find a way to release that - perhaps with something physical like brief exercise - otherwise it's nowhere to go. It's a chemical reaction and it can disperse after an hour or so, but if you happen to be the type of person who will think things over and dwell on stuff - especially at night - then you'll just keep feeding that negative energy instead of letting it go.

Depending on the kind of things which make you anxious, if applicable, a good approach is to expose yourself to the source of the anxiety. Just as an example, say you were scared of spiders. You could place yourself in close proximity to a spider and would obviously be extremely anxious to begin with and so would most likely leave that situation as quick as possible. But if you then went back to that very same situation, the level of anxiety would actually be lower because you would already be familiar with the scenario and indeed with the spider, so maybe you would be able to stay there a little longer. Repeating that often enough would mean that you would be able to stay longer and longer each time and, given that it only takes about fifteen minutes for anxiety to start to fade once your brain realises you no longer need to be alert to what was initially perceived as a threat, you would find that the majority of time spent in that situation would no longer be accompanied by feelings of anxiety.

Like I said at the start, a big thing for me does indeed relate to my skin and how it is perceived by others. I'm no good with social situations in that respect and I usually avoid them as a result. That is another coping mechanism which has done me more harm than good because it's been in place for so long and to such a degree that I feel out of touch with people - strangers who could potentially be friends, girls who could potentially be partners - like I don't really fit and as though I've lost some of those social skills I might once have had. In that scenario, the graded exposure technique is ideal because I would certainly be in a totally anxious state to begin with as I scope out what is going on around me and check out the people in terms of whether or not I think they might view me negatively or make fun of me if my skin isn't looking too good. If they did view me in that way and I were to then feel like they had become a threat, that anxiety would serve its purpose because the adrenaline it would provide would allow me to get out of that situation pretty fast. But, if I go into that situation and it doesn't turn out as bad as anticipated, the level of anxiety will have reduced by comparison when I go into that same kind of situation the next time, and the time after that, and so on. Of course, I understand the theory and can talk the talk. Now I have to do the hard bit and see if I can work out how to put myself out there initially in order to start meeting people and use those social situations as a tool to help me remove my anxieties.

As well as those kind of methods, there are other practical things you can do. In terms of the space around you, order is good. I had gone almost two weeks without cleaning my room and I had things all over and was starting to misplace stuff. I was actually giving myself reasons to be anxious because I was having to find stuff and remember where I'd put certain things. I tidied up earlier today and organised a few things so now, that little source of anxiety has now gone. Sometimes, several little things like that can add up and make a notable difference to what's going on in your head, in terms of removing things which you don't have to hold onto and remember, giving yourself a better chance of winding down and switching off for a while.

Here's hoping you can start to get it under control and start to feel more relaxed and better in yourself very soon! :)

Edited by PaulH85

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1. Try hatha flow yoga. It's a style of yoga that focuses on breathing and keeping your inner peace - very slow, but very relaxing. If you're not the yoga type, remember (when you are feeling anxious) to breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth. It sounds stupid, but it often works.

2. Speaking of breathing - don't forget what you learned in elementary school. Count backwards from 10, take three deep breaths, and think nice thoughts.

3. Back when I was on the Accutane, I used to get HORRIBLE flashes of anxiety that were nearly like panic attacks. I'd be okay one minute, and then all of a sudden would need to run to the washroom to break down crying the next, sometimes without even being triggered by anything... and this would happen at least a couple of times a day. I found that disassociating my mind from whatever was going on around me helped with this - like I'd just take a deep breath and pretend that I was just some movie-goer watching a movie, like none of whatever was happening was actually hapening to me, and eventually I'd calm down.

4. Do talk to somebody about your anxiety. You might sometimes build a fear up in your head and then need a good dose of reality to rectify your perspective.

5. For the love of god keep a decent sleep schedule. There is nothing worse than being awake at 3 AM in the morning with the very worst kind of thoughts running through your brain. Do whatever you can to wake up before 10 AM (I'm a late riser, so I usually get up at 9 AM) and be under the covers before 11 PM (and hopefully asleep by midnight). Losing sleep can also screw with your head in pretty bad ways.

6. The same goes for diet. Anxiety is linked to level of serotonin in the brain, and certain eating habits can either increase or reduce that level of serotonin. Blueberries and dark chocolate are great for helping with anxiety (plus the former at least is full of antioxidants and therefore great for your skin), while caffeine and fried foods are not so great. Skipping meals (and not eating enough carbs) may screw with your blood sugar levels, which will consequently screw with your energy levels as well, therefore depleting your mental resources for coping with anxiety.

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Take some time for yourself! I struggle with anxiety (mainly panic disorder.. yuck). I usually do some light yoga, reading, have a patchouli bubble bath and drink chamomile lavender tea. This usually helps a lot!

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Roll one up.

Lol wouldn't that make you sooooo paranoid?

I find it often depends on what's at the root of it, in terms how I respond and what things will help to ease it.

I've been working on anxiety in therapy recently and looking at what triggers it. I've found a few situations, usually involving meetings or appointments, which cause me to feel anxious. Add to that, I usually "relieve" that anxiety and tension by taking it out on my skin. Of course, that's the main problem at the heart of everything for me anyway, so my attempt at coping in fact only ends up making things so much worse. At the very least, that means I need to find a more appropriate coping mechanism and certainly one which isn't quite literally so harmful. Beyond that, it would be more productive for me to learn how to cope better in those situations which trigger my anxieties and insecurities to begin with.

Maybe that's something you could do. Take the situation with your sister for example: rather than trying to cope with the anxiety which comes from that situation, it will be better in the long run for all concerned, I imagine, if you get to the root of why you're at odds with your sister and why that seems to be a constant and reoccurring thing. It would be more productive to get to the heart of that and fix that, removing the anxiety as a result.

It's near impossible to, "just relax", as people are sometimes quite to suggest. I mean to "try" and relax implies that you're trying and you're putting effort and energy into it. That doesn't work because you're conscious of it and you move further away from switching off and truly relaxing. Anxiety serves a purpose in that it's usually there to make us more alert and to heighten our senses, making us more aware in order to prepare for something. It's usually something with negative connotations like a conflict or a threat. At best it would be some kind of challenge or task. It's like an energy and a form of adrenaline and it's best to find a way to release that - perhaps with something physical like brief exercise - otherwise it's nowhere to go. It's a chemical reaction and it can disperse after an hour or so, but if you happen to be the type of person who will think things over and dwell on stuff - especially at night - then you'll just keep feeding that negative energy instead of letting it go.

Depending on the kind of things which make you anxious, if applicable, a good approach is to expose yourself to the source of the anxiety. Just as an example, say you were scared of spiders. You could place yourself in close proximity to a spider and would obviously be extremely anxious to begin with and so would most likely leave that situation as quick as possible. But if you then went back to that very same situation, the level of anxiety would actually be lower because you would already be familiar with the scenario and indeed with the spider, so maybe you would be able to stay there a little longer. Repeating that often enough would mean that you would be able to stay longer and longer each time and, given that it only takes about fifteen minutes for anxiety to start to fade once your brain realises you no longer need to be alert to what was initially perceived as a threat, you would find that the majority of time spent in that situation would no longer be accompanied by feelings of anxiety.

Like I said at the start, a big thing for me does indeed relate to my skin and how it is perceived by others. I'm no good with social situations in that respect and I usually avoid them as a result. That is another coping mechanism which has done me more harm than good because it's been in place for so long and to such a degree that I feel out of touch with people - strangers who could potentially be friends, girls who could potentially be partners - like I don't really fit and as though I've lost some of those social skills I might once have had. In that scenario, the graded exposure technique is ideal because I would certainly be in a totally anxious state to begin with as I scope out what is going on around me and check out the people in terms of whether or not I think they might view me negatively or make fun of me if my skin isn't looking too good. If they did view me in that way and I were to then feel like they had become a threat, that anxiety would serve its purpose because the adrenaline it would provide would allow me to get out of that situation pretty fast. But, if I go into that situation and it doesn't turn out as bad as anticipated, the level of anxiety will have reduced by comparison when I go into that same kind of situation the next time, and the time after that, and so on. Of course, I understand the theory and can talk the talk. Now I have to do the hard bit and see if I can work out how to put myself out there initially in order to start meeting people and use those social situations as a tool to help me remove my anxieties.

As well as those kind of methods, there are other practical things you can do. In terms of the space around you, order is good. I had gone almost two weeks without cleaning my room and I had things all over and was starting to misplace stuff. I was actually giving myself reasons to be anxious because I was having to find stuff and remember where I'd put certain things. I tidied up earlier today and organised a few things so now, that little source of anxiety has now gone. Sometimes, several little things like that can add up and make a notable difference to what's going on in your head, in terms of removing things which you don't have to hold onto and remember, giving yourself a better chance of winding down and switching off for a while.

Here's hoping you can start to get it under control and start to feel more relaxed and better in yourself very soon! :)

Thank you so much for taking the time to write this. I am glad I am not alone =\ I will try and follow this. I guess it just takes time and practice huh? I'm moving to a new city come january and on the 9th of that month I will turn 21 so I will have this be a new beginning for me(: I will try my hardest to work on everything...

Today my mom woke up in the pissiest mood. I started feeling frustrated and with your post in mind, I tried not to let it bother me. In fact I went downstairs and tried to help her clean the house to ease up her frustrations a bit. It helped her alot and because of it she calmed down. I feel like o kind of tackled the problem at the root and it helped(: I had a great day.

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pot

just buy a mini stash and blaze up at home and chill the hell out with some santana or pink floyd or some shit

Edited by heyjoe

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Today my mom woke up in the pissiest mood. I started feeling frustrated and with your post in mind, I tried not to let it bother me. In fact I went downstairs and tried to help her clean the house to ease up her frustrations a bit. It helped her alot and because of it she calmed down. I feel like o kind of tackled the problem at the root and it helped(: I had a great day.

Cool. Well done! :hifive:

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Lol wouldn't that make you sooooo paranoid?

lol no where are u getting your information from...

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Lol wouldn't that make you sooooo paranoid?

lol no where are u getting your information from...

It really depends on how much you smoke/take and how you ingest the marijuana. Back when I used to smoke weed (back in college and all that), it'd take me two joints before I felt the effects taking place, and I never felt paranoia. But I have friends who eat a few "special brownies" and then get SUPER paranoid about stuff - it's pretty trippy just to watch them.

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^ lol yes some people react differently. If anything seeing someone else freak out makes me freak out.

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I ended up writing quite a novel. So i thought i'd share my no1 advice first: TALK. talk. talk. tell someone. turn your thougths into words. write them down if you really don't have anyone to talk to, but just get it out of your self and into the world. When feelings become thoguths that become words we are healing.

Now, here's the rest of my advice:

- I used to get panic attacks every week a few years back. My anxiety levels were already quite high, and in addition to that there was the constant fear of having a panic attack, which ofcourse increases the risk of the actual attack. Classic downward sprial. What helped me was some advice i found on a website (i think it's called "the panic center" or something like that). They had all sorts of advice on panic attacks, but what stayed with me was this one:

when you are beginning to experience anxiety, don't fight it. Instead of trying to push it away, let it come. Lie down on your bed and feel it in your body. If you're afraid you'll die (assuming you're not experiencing any physical symptoms of acute illness): let it kill you. let the anxiety show you what it got. see what happens if you just let the anxiety do what you fear it will - take over. Observe and relax, and it will pass.

I feel this is sort of like a counter-defence. Once I let down my guard and faced the anxiety it would subside after a short while. Since the anxiety/panic is part of YOU the harder you push away the harder it will push back (since you're the one controling all of the pushing). If you conciously relax the anxiety will relax as well, if i'm not being all confusing.

- Dr Bach remedies. They're sort of in the same field as homeopathy, and has helped me with all sorts of emotional issues. There's one called the Five Flower Remedy/the Rescue Remedy that helps with anxiety and worries, shock and grief. There's 38 different flower essences that each have its special properties, and you can combine up to 5 essences at once. They help you through emotional blocks, stress, fatigue, anxiety, confidence et.c. very good. google it, there are lots of good wenbsites with good info.

- Do a guided relaxation. there are tons of them on youtube where a nice yogic person talks you through a good relaxation of your mind and body, really good for stress and letting go. Anxiety useually makes us tense our muscles, and tense muscles in turn makes our bodies think we're anxious, and round and round it goes - so relaxing those muscles takes the edge off it. or at least helps you get a bit of healthy distance.

- EFT, emotional freedom techniques. I'm very curious about these, although i don't practice them. They believe that all sorts of emotional (and perhaps even physical) blocks or troubles can be helped by unlocking a couple of acu-points in your body. There's a lot of info online, and a few books, and the basic idea is that you tap a couple of places on your body in a specific order to release bound up energy and create positive flow.

- As said before: practice good, deep breathing. engage your core muscles in pushing all that air out - release and just let it flow back in without any effort, and then engage your core and start exhaling....relaxing your upper body, back, sides and diaphragm (the one in your chest, not the contraceptive one... ) when you let air in, and use your stomach muscles when you exhale.

- Cutting out caffeine was a major thing for me. I used to sip on black tea all day, which made my heart race and my anxiety levels pop. I've been caffeine free for over a year and it's really helping. I think a lot of people are more sensitive to caffeine than they think.

- Eat well. As with everything in life good food helps you heal. Hunger makes me very anxious, so I try to make sure to eat at least 5 times a day.

- Taking care of all your senses. When i feel anxious and want to relax i useually feel like i'm trapped in my mental self, that my physical self is disconnected. So I try to get balance by paying attention to all my senses. This cold be: massaging my feet with a nice cream (touch), eating or drinking something i truly love (taste), sniffing my favourite vanilla candle (smell), being in a beautiful environment/keeping my room tidy and nice pictures around me (sight), listening to songs i love (hearing).

Ok that was really long. I had my fair share of anxiety, I guess. Still not free, but i have these techniques to help me relax and get back to myself when it strikes.

best wishes!

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I ended up writing quite a novel. So i thought i'd share my no1 advice first: TALK. talk. talk. tell someone. turn your thougths into words. write them down if you really don't have anyone to talk to, but just get it out of your self and into the world. When feelings become thoguths that become words we are healing.

Now, here's the rest of my advice:

- I used to get panic attacks every week a few years back. My anxiety levels were already quite high, and in addition to that there was the constant fear of having a panic attack, which ofcourse increases the risk of the actual attack. Classic downward sprial. What helped me was some advice i found on a website (i think it's called "the panic center" or something like that). They had all sorts of advice on panic attacks, but what stayed with me was this one:

when you are beginning to experience anxiety, don't fight it. Instead of trying to push it away, let it come. Lie down on your bed and feel it in your body. If you're afraid you'll die (assuming you're not experiencing any physical symptoms of acute illness): let it kill you. let the anxiety show you what it got. see what happens if you just let the anxiety do what you fear it will - take over. Observe and relax, and it will pass.

I feel this is sort of like a counter-defence. Once I let down my guard and faced the anxiety it would subside after a short while. Since the anxiety/panic is part of YOU the harder you push away the harder it will push back (since you're the one controling all of the pushing). If you conciously relax the anxiety will relax as well, if i'm not being all confusing.

- Dr Bach remedies. They're sort of in the same field as homeopathy, and has helped me with all sorts of emotional issues. There's one called the Five Flower Remedy/the Rescue Remedy that helps with anxiety and worries, shock and grief. There's 38 different flower essences that each have its special properties, and you can combine up to 5 essences at once. They help you through emotional blocks, stress, fatigue, anxiety, confidence et.c. very good. google it, there are lots of good wenbsites with good info.

- Do a guided relaxation. there are tons of them on youtube where a nice yogic person talks you through a good relaxation of your mind and body, really good for stress and letting go. Anxiety useually makes us tense our muscles, and tense muscles in turn makes our bodies think we're anxious, and round and round it goes - so relaxing those muscles takes the edge off it. or at least helps you get a bit of healthy distance.

- EFT, emotional freedom techniques. I'm very curious about these, although i don't practice them. They believe that all sorts of emotional (and perhaps even physical) blocks or troubles can be helped by unlocking a couple of acu-points in your body. There's a lot of info online, and a few books, and the basic idea is that you tap a couple of places on your body in a specific order to release bound up energy and create positive flow.

- As said before: practice good, deep breathing. engage your core muscles in pushing all that air out - release and just let it flow back in without any effort, and then engage your core and start exhaling....relaxing your upper body, back, sides and diaphragm (the one in your chest, not the contraceptive one... ) when you let air in, and use your stomach muscles when you exhale.

- Cutting out caffeine was a major thing for me. I used to sip on black tea all day, which made my heart race and my anxiety levels pop. I've been caffeine free for over a year and it's really helping. I think a lot of people are more sensitive to caffeine than they think.

- Eat well. As with everything in life good food helps you heal. Hunger makes me very anxious, so I try to make sure to eat at least 5 times a day.

- Taking care of all your senses. When i feel anxious and want to relax i useually feel like i'm trapped in my mental self, that my physical self is disconnected. So I try to get balance by paying attention to all my senses. This cold be: massaging my feet with a nice cream (touch), eating or drinking something i truly love (taste), sniffing my favourite vanilla candle (smell), being in a beautiful environment/keeping my room tidy and nice pictures around me (sight), listening to songs i love (hearing).

Ok that was really long. I had my fair share of anxiety, I guess. Still not free, but i have these techniques to help me relax and get back to myself when it strikes.

best wishes!

Thank you so much. The thing that you said about letting yourself feel the emotions kind of reminded me of what Paul said In a sense. Anxiety does freak me out (which is true does cause more anxiety) but if I allow myself to kind of get used to it and not feel so feared, I'll become accustomed to it. Pretty soon it'll be nothing and I can learn to control it by working with it not against it(:

Caffeine does do that? I drink a lot of green tea=\ but yesterday at work I drank like three cups of chamomile and that calmed me down so much(:

I love talking here. It's kind of hard because I do this from my iPhone so I have ally of mistakes and things are so small to read lol. But I started out being a lurker on this site. Then I finally made an account: then only last week I added a picture. Now I feel like I can talk to anyone on here and am becoming more social and active here. It's not just a place for research on cures, but a place to vent and socialize with other people from around the world I have in common with. It's great

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For me, I have to do something physical. Whether that is working out, going for a run, cleaning my room, or just pacing around in circles, it doesn't matter, but I have to be doing something physical and active and engaging. While I know that anxiety is generally mental, letting that tension out of my body seems to help the most.

If it happens while I am trying to sleep, I focus on my breathing and I clench every muscle in my body (starting with my toes) for ten seconds, then release them slowly. Sounds silly, but it gives you something else to focus on and definitely relieves tension in your body.

Yoga has been helpful for me too, even though it's definitely more about your mental approach than physical. Just find a routine that works for you, and whenever you feel that anxiety rear its hand, fall back to your routine and be confident.

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I've also been noticing my anxiety increases a lot more in the night. It may be because I take my bc pills at night. But i just get it so much and im half asleep hating on the world.... It's so weird

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Anxiety/panic attacks = no fun. "It's in your head. I want to feel good. You are okay. Stop worries. Live in the moment. It will and so will you". This is my mantra-my daily, every second, every minute, meditation. My coping chant. Problems arise when everyday snags turn into these overblown, false, assumptions, that only take place in your mind.That is panic and anxiety which leads (for me) to depression. You worry. That is how you cope. You stress. That feels familiar. What about just saying no to feeling like shi*? It's okay! It's okay to nervous-but not to the point where life is not lived. Everyday is opportunity to change your mindset and be thankful for where you are in this very moment. Look around and help others. Helping others will make a heart and mind so full, fear has no place but to leave. It's a struggle and a learning journey. Your not alone! More than ever you were given a gift. A gift that allows you to recognize "life" is out there waiting for you. Leap of faith. Hope. My tat on my forearm read this: "Change the way you look at things and the things you look at will change" Believe this...

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Anxiety/panic attacks = no fun. "It's in your head. I want to feel good. You are okay. Stop worries. Live in the moment. It will and so will you". This is my mantra-my daily, every second, every minute, meditation. My coping chant. Problems arise when everyday snags turn into these overblown, false, assumptions, that only take place in your mind.That is panic and anxiety which leads (for me) to depression. You worry. That is how you cope. You stress. That feels familiar. What about just saying no to feeling like shi*? It's okay! It's okay to nervous-but not to the point where life is not lived. Everyday is opportunity to change your mindset and be thankful for where you are in this very moment. Look around and help others. Helping others will make a heart and mind so full, fear has no place but to leave. It's a struggle and a learning journey. Your not alone! More than ever you were given a gift. A gift that allows you to recognize "life" is out there waiting for you. Leap of faith. Hope. My tat on my forearm read this: "Change the way you look at things and the things you look at will change" Believe this...

I don't know if you meant an actual, literal chant but that DOES work. For me, anyhow. I get panic attacks seemingly randomly. Driving. In the middle ofa perfectly mundane conversation. At the grocery store. And I've found that if I pause, focus on my breathing, and repeat in my head "you are not dying" the attack subsides much quicker than if I just let myself panic.

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I need to think of a chant. Thinking about anxiety is causing me more anxiety :( I hate this. It doesn't help that I make myself feel so guilty for everything. Especially what I eat :( Man acne causes so much trouble

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