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i remember my mom took me to see a therapist once and it was the dumbest thing ever...and a waste of $30. There was nothing she could have said to make me go outside not thinking about my face.

She literally told me what what my parents tell me everyday...just go out, dont think about it and every teenager goes through it.

My acne is kinda under control now (accutane) but im still very self conscious about my craters and dark marks.

And to be honest, i wont be satisfied until my skin is 100% (or at least 90).

Have any of u been seen a therapist for acne issues? did u feel better?

Edited by Nelo18

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Opinion only*

Therapy that requires a form of exchange for the services (be it dollars, favours, property) can help but it is not born from love, hence the very act of help is tainted and so it is to be less effective than it might have been.

If one is to receive therapy from a source which requires nothing in return the chances of therapy being more effective is greatly improved. Thus self therapy is guaranteed to require nothing in return because it is service to self which is love. Every person has the ability to do this, and you must believe this. Despite the horrendously common counter claims by professionals sourcing from technical studies and supposed iron clad scientific data.

Any persons wishing to gain anything from helping others is by logic, taking something from you. This is not to say that clinical therapists whom charge for their services are deceitful or malevolent in anyway but to take something from someone is not love, hence the opportunity to help another is reduced.

Trust in love, because love has the ability to heal all.

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i remember my mom took me to see a therapist once and it was the dumbest thing ever...and a waste of $30. There was nothing she could have said to make me go outside not thinking about my face.

She literally told me what what my parents tell me everyday...just go out, dont think about it and every teenager goes through it.

My acne is kinda under control (accutane) but im still very self conscious about my craters and dark marks.

And to be honest, i wont be satisfied until my skin is 100% (or at least 90).

Have any of u been seen a therapist for acne issues? did u feel better?

Here are my thoughts about seeing a therapist.

1. If your insecurities,low self -esteem or anxities are holding you back, then you should seek professional help.

2. I love studying psychology and do believe that it can help you to get thru many life problems.

3. If you're not satisfied with your appointment, find another, better one.

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i remember my mom took me to see a therapist once and it was the dumbest thing ever...and a waste of $30. There was nothing she could have said to make me go outside not thinking about my face.

She literally told me what what my parents tell me everyday...just go out, dont think about it and every teenager goes through it.

Have any of u been seen a therapist for acne issues? did u feel better?

To answer your initial question, if you're open to it, yes it can help.

I have not seen a therapist for acne though I have for anxiety and depression. And I supposed those are two common mental ailments in persons with acne.

If you're thinking of trying this route again it can be expensive. You have to doctor shop. You need to find someone you can trust and be honest with and someone who is competent. Which is a tall order. From the statements that she made I'd say she isn't fit for caring for your particular case. Any doc you get is going to tell you things that you don't like or think is stupid anyway. But it's not about that it's about sharing your feelings and getting feedback and advice on how you could try to think about yourself in a different light.

It's tough as nails and it's just plain not for everyone. Be strong friend.

Opinion only*

Therapy that requires a form of exchange for the services (be it dollars, favours, property) can help but it is not born from love, hence the very act of help is tainted and so it is to be less effective than it might have been.

If one is to receive therapy from a source which requires nothing in return the chances of therapy being more effective is greatly improved. Thus self therapy is guaranteed to require nothing in return because it is service to self which is love. Every person has the ability to do this, and you must believe this. Despite the horrendously common counter claims by professionals sourcing from technical studies and supposed iron clad scientific data.

Any persons wishing to gain anything from helping others is by logic, taking something from you. This is not to say that clinical therapists whom charge for their services are deceitful or malevolent in anyway but to take something from someone is not love, hence the opportunity to help another is reduced.

Your theory is flawed.

1) Some people love their occupation, therapists included. Therefore, doing what they love in helping people is their reward and not their compensation for services rendered.

2) "Self-therapy" is a service you're doing yourself. This requires effort and hard work, not "nothing".

3) Anyone who has ever willingly helped someone else was gaining something or as you put it "taking something", yourself included.

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I think it can help, yes. I'm so glad I went to see my doctor and asked about my options regarding depression because if I hadn't have asked for alternatives, he would have given me some pills and sent me on my way. I'm unable to afford any kind of private therapy or anything like that so I went through the free health service we have here. I did wonder how good it would be because it's free but the bottom line is that the therapists do the very same training as anyone who runs a private office. I feel lucky because the two ladies who run the group sessions I attend are really nice and I can tell that they love their job, they want to help us and they get so much back as they see us progress as a direct result of what they are teaching us. Everyone wins.

I've been doing CBT to help me change my approaches to certain things and hlp me beat depression. The more sessions I do, the more I realise that the sessions themselves can only do so much. You get back what you put in and you have to be willing to share things which you would perhaps rather keep private. I got kind of worked up about that but it wasn't hard. Any nerves I had were cancelled out by the fact that I knew it would benefit me and help me turn a corner because the therapists know, the more they can understand where I'm coming from and the more they can help.

I have come to learn that the root of all my issues are my inseurities regarding my appearance and my skin. My response to my skin and especially picking is also a major issue and it's something I need to deal with. The group CBT sessions aren't going to help with that directly because it's not tailored to me and it's just matter of fact that nobody else in the group can relate directly. So when I finish these sessions, I'll go looking for something else which perhaps fits a bit more and can support me with those spacific things.

That's not to say the CBT hasn't been of use. Even if you start something and it doesn't quite work out, it brings you a step closer to finding the best route for you. With that in mind, I would suggest looking into it. Even if things didn't quite go to plan the first time, try somebody else and consider if perhaps you could also change how you approach it yourself. There's nothing to lose really. :)

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I've had enormous help from therapy. Obviously, it's not something that will help directly with acne, but if you have problems that are related to acne, like anxiety, lack of confidence, depression or obsessive picking therapy might really help with that.

Personally I recommend going to a psychotherapist and be open to the possibility that healing youself might include talking about stuff that hasn't got specifically to do with acne. It's about building a relationship (with the therapist and yourself) and healing from growing as a person.

And, since no-one *really* knows where acne comes from, there's a *possibility* that (for some people) it's triggered by inner stress and aggressions - the kind you need help to acknowledge and talk through/learn how to deal with.

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i do think therapy can help with depression/self esteem issues, but not with sever acne issues.

My acne is causing my depression and i will be happy once im clear (i was never depressed before acne came in the picture).

all i want is great skin.

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Your theory is flawed.

1) Some people love their occupation, therapists included. Therefore, doing what they love in helping people is their reward and not their compensation for services rendered.

Compensation for services rendered... Love is given freely my dear child, it cannot be accompanied by any compensation other than love*(which cannot be measured or valued or defined so it's not actually compensation*) However I do not disagree that 'their' reward is helping.

"Self-therapy" is a service you're doing yourself. This requires effort and hard work, not "nothing".

Life is effort and hard work. Notice how I wrote nothing in return I guess you have misread or misunderstood that part.

Anyone who has ever willingly helped someone else was gaining something or as you put it "taking something", yourself included.

Please provide an example of this statement if you will.

*I added this part so as you may understand your 3rd point from a different perspective.

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I see what you're saying about services rendered. I guess I just see that as a negative way of looking at it and I'd rather see it as someone wanting to help me. That's easier in my position I suppose because the therapy I receive at present is totally free to me. And I agree with what was said before about how anyone who helps someone also gets something out of it. But we all know that, they're things which you can't put a price on, such as the satisfaction of doing a good deed or seeing that your presence and input has had a positive influence on another. I always find it much easier to help others because you're on the outside of it and you can see how they benefit so it's like a win-win situation.

But relating this specifically to acne and the emotional side of that, I'd imagine it would be hard not to look at it a negative way. I think even I would struggle to see the therapist in the way I described at the start of my post if I was able to gather that they had no direct experience of my condition. At best, they would be able to give a general overview based on the principles of whatever therapy they provide. I doubt very much that they would be able to see it clearly from the perspective of an acne sufferer. There are things like triggers and little coping mechanisms, approaching different sources of light and mirrors, and so on - I'm not sure they'd truly get that stuff.

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Please see Paul's first paragraph for my response.

Anywho, my dear Mr H, you're swaying me a bit to your point of view. I can see where someone who has been in our situation would be best to help us see the light. But I still hold my feeling that for the purposes of psychological treatment in the effects of acne it shouldn't matter that much.

I've got two thoughts conflicting right now. The best sponsors for junkies/alcoholics have been there, done that and thrown up in the bathroom. But on the other hand, my doctor never broke his sternum but he sure helped me when I broke mine and I think not any better or worse than a doctor who had could have.

Ahhhh brain overload!

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And I agree with what was said before about how anyone who helps someone also gets something out of it. But we all know that, they're things which you can't put a price on, such as the satisfaction of doing a good deed or seeing that your presence and input has had a positive influence on another.
Please see Paul's first paragraph for my response.

Lets define something("gets something out of it") for the purpose of this discussion. Something: being a physical material, constructed of atoms (money, gold, silver etc) or The exchange of physical labor from one to another.

A thought or feeling or emotion that one experiences when helping another person is not a something, it is constructed in the mind, and for all intents and purposes is completely imaginary.

Once this fact is grasped you can understand what I intended to communicate in my first post. I don't believe it is negative point of view, it is merely an observation.

Here is a scenario to consider;

A clinical therapist offers their help and love to others but requires no compensation for services rendered. However, if the persons that have received help wish to compensate the clinical therapist for the help received they are free to do so. This is an example of love. and of which has the greatest opportunity to help another.

Any other scenario where it is required to compensate for services rendered, is tainted love.

I do not state periodically that a clinical therapist whom requires compensation for services rendered can NOT help. OR that they are anything but wanting to help people. It simply is tainted because it requires something to be taken from you. thus not love because love is FREE :) simple!

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Well, good sir, let me point out that I never said your point of view was negative. I just wanted to poke the bear and see what the crap he was thinking.

I cannot imagine why everything is love in your brain but in fairness I suppose that's a better view than thinking everything is purple elephants or something.

My sincerest wishes to you on your journey to imagine that you can imaginarily fix yourself and other with imaginary love.

wiggle.gif

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Paul stated he sees it as negative.

One day you will look back upon yourself as I have done and realise that love is not at all imaginary. Love will 'fix' yourself and will 'fix' others.

Be at peace, love will find you, you can't hide from it forever.

clickhandlerashxruhttp3.jpg

for the discussion

smile.png

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LOL that is the cutest thing evar! Thanks for sharing <3

And sorry, I thought you were talking to me not Mr. H.

Also, I don't think love is imaginary, you said it was so I was trying to put that in your words to make you feel comfortable. I have my love, not hiding, I'm good ;)

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gasp! I never state love is imaginary! emotions are however... love is life, words cannot begin to describe actual love. (love common understood to be emotion/feeling but that is just that a word for an emotion/feeling) actual love.. well like I say it cannot be described, only known :)

common usage/understanding of the english word love = not actual Love.

This is something I have to work on communicating the difference, my apologies and thank you for bringing it to my attention.

When I say Love I mean the universal unconditional unity of all things, the foundation of life. ehh that does not do it justice!

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i was in therapy for a while, for a few reasons, ive had acne since i was 10, and it was never mild, it spread over my body like a damn wildfire, so by the time i was 13, i had so many unplesant nicknames i dont think anyone even knew my real name anymore, then when i was 15 i had an emergency colostomy surgery (hence the nickname), then another surgery 6 months later to fix the first one, of course missed a year of high school and couldnt graduate with my friends, then when i was 19 i lost my dad to cancer, and acne can go fuck itself after something like that in my life, im 23 now and im done with therapy, but for that entire decade i was in therapy.....and it helped in some ways....probably one of the best things i ever heard (for free, it was in my first complementary session) was that a lot of therapy is dependent on my willingness to accept myself and to change my perspectives; i was younger, more stubborn, and lets face it stupider, so i just spent my time crying and blaming, it wasnt until very recently that i realized my life HAS to be about a lot more than my acne, and ive worked damn hard to ditch my surly attitude and it honestly feels like such a huge weight of my shoulders, i dont remember ever feeling happier and more confident than since i started focusing on things that really matter to me and on things that make me feel good, and no joke(just this once), this place helped me get through some very tough times, even when i didnt post and just browsed, reading people's struggles made me feel oddly connected and less lonely, and that in itself was enough to make me feel like i wasn't lonely or misunderstood...its better than most thrapy i think i paid for my psychiatrist's kids' universities! and the lexus they drove to campus!

bottom line, if u WANT therapy to work it will, but dont expect a miracle; as most fortune cookies say 'find your inner strength,' and fortune cookies are cheaper and taste better than therapy

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"and acne can go fuck itself after something like that" eusa_clap.gif

Thanks for your story. You're a strong young man and I respect you. Not that you need my validation. *interwebz hugzzz*

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hug recieved!:D feels warm and fuzzy like it should, thank you! i really do believe changing my perspective was the hardest part, but its also the most important one

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i was in therapy for a while, for a few reasons, ive had acne since i was 10, and it was never mild, it spread over my body like a damn wildfire, so by the time i was 13, i had so many unplesant nicknames i dont think anyone even knew my real name anymore, then when i was 15 i had an emergency colostomy surgery (hence the nickname), then another surgery 6 months later to fix the first one, of course missed a year of high school and couldnt graduate with my friends, then when i was 19 i lost my dad to cancer, and acne can go fuck itself after something like that in my life, im 23 now and im done with therapy, but for that entire decade i was in therapy.....and it helped in some ways....probably one of the best things i ever heard (for free, it was in my first complementary session) was that a lot of therapy is dependent on my willingness to accept myself and to change my perspectives; i was younger, more stubborn, and lets face it stupider, so i just spent my time crying and blaming, it wasnt until very recently that i realized my life HAS to be about a lot more than my acne, and ive worked damn hard to ditch my surly attitude and it honestly feels like such a huge weight of my shoulders, i dont remember ever feeling happier and more confident than since i started focusing on things that really matter to me and on things that make me feel good, and no joke(just this once), this place helped me get through some very tough times, even when i didnt post and just browsed, reading people's struggles made me feel oddly connected and less lonely, and that in itself was enough to make me feel like i wasn't lonely or misunderstood...its better than most thrapy i think i paid for my psychiatrist's kids' universities! and the lexus they drove to campus!

Dude some of the stuff you have been through is crazy, makes me feel like a dumbass for complaining.

Kudos to you for being so strong hifive.gif

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lol, high five acknowledged! thanks for your words:D and don't feel like a dumbass for complaining! how many places do we get to actually complain and STILL have people reply back with positive and motivating responses?not many that i know. Yeah i went through a lot, and i know there'll be more coming my way, thats just life, but how i deal with it is whats gonna count.

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i was in therapy for a while, for a few reasons, ive had acne since i was 10, and it was never mild, it spread over my body like a damn wildfire, so by the time i was 13, i had so many unplesant nicknames i dont think anyone even knew my real name anymore, then when i was 15 i had an emergency colostomy surgery (hence the nickname), then another surgery 6 months later to fix the first one, of course missed a year of high school and couldnt graduate with my friends, then when i was 19 i lost my dad to cancer, and acne can go fuck itself after something like that in my life, im 23 now and im done with therapy, but for that entire decade i was in therapy.....and it helped in some ways....probably one of the best things i ever heard (for free, it was in my first complementary session) was that a lot of therapy is dependent on my willingness to accept myself and to change my perspectives; i was younger, more stubborn, and lets face it stupider, so i just spent my time crying and blaming, it wasnt until very recently that i realized my life HAS to be about a lot more than my acne, and ive worked damn hard to ditch my surly attitude and it honestly feels like such a huge weight of my shoulders, i dont remember ever feeling happier and more confident than since i started focusing on things that really matter to me and on things that make me feel good, and no joke(just this once), this place helped me get through some very tough times, even when i didnt post and just browsed, reading people's struggles made me feel oddly connected and less lonely, and that in itself was enough to make me feel like i wasn't lonely or misunderstood...its better than most thrapy i think i paid for my psychiatrist's kids' universities! and the lexus they drove to campus!

bottom line, if u WANT therapy to work it will, but dont expect a miracle; as most fortune cookies say 'find your inner strength,' and fortune cookies are cheaper and taste better than therapy

i wish i had the strength u have and just not care, but its really hard for me.

i was always the kid that liked to look nice, smell good, loved talking to girls, making them laugh,

so when acne came in, it hit me hard. i just dont feel like myself. im 19 now, no job or school. its been 3 years since i been out and actually had a good time.

i was in therapy for a while, for a few reasons, ive had acne since i was 10, and it was never mild, it spread over my body like a damn wildfire, so by the time i was 13, i had so many unplesant nicknames i dont think anyone even knew my real name anymore, then when i was 15 i had an emergency colostomy surgery (hence the nickname), then another surgery 6 months later to fix the first one, of course missed a year of high school and couldnt graduate with my friends, then when i was 19 i lost my dad to cancer, and acne can go fuck itself after something like that in my life, im 23 now and im done with therapy, but for that entire decade i was in therapy.....and it helped in some ways....probably one of the best things i ever heard (for free, it was in my first complementary session) was that a lot of therapy is dependent on my willingness to accept myself and to change my perspectives; i was younger, more stubborn, and lets face it stupider, so i just spent my time crying and blaming, it wasnt until very recently that i realized my life HAS to be about a lot more than my acne, and ive worked damn hard to ditch my surly attitude and it honestly feels like such a huge weight of my shoulders, i dont remember ever feeling happier and more confident than since i started focusing on things that really matter to me and on things that make me feel good, and no joke(just this once), this place helped me get through some very tough times, even when i didnt post and just browsed, reading people's struggles made me feel oddly connected and less lonely, and that in itself was enough to make me feel like i wasn't lonely or misunderstood...its better than most thrapy i think i paid for my psychiatrist's kids' universities! and the lexus they drove to campus!

bottom line, if u WANT therapy to work it will, but dont expect a miracle; as most fortune cookies say 'find your inner strength,' and fortune cookies are cheaper and taste better than therapy

i wish i had the strength u have and just not care, but its really hard for me.

i was always the kid that liked to look nice, smell good, loved talking to girls, making them laugh,

so when acne came in, it hit me hard. i just dont feel like myself. im 19 now, no job or school. its been 3 years since i been out and actually had a good time.

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dont get me wrong my friend, i DO care, its just that stressing about it didnt make it go away, people only have so much pity to shell out before they start getting annoyed by depressing attitudes, and i missed out on a lot when i was busy moping over my bad luck...but since ive made a conscious effort to try and get over myself, things are slowly but definitely better. and its not that i just try and maintain a positive attitude; im a very good dresser, cuz that makes a statement too, and i have good hygeine(like most people who try and care for their skin), a very nice smile(or so im told), and i tell a lot of jokes(how many is too many, id rather not know) and try to be nice to everyone(except my enemies, those guys suck), and people respond well to that stuff, and that RESPONSE, the compliments people give me for being nice, or being funny, or good at my job, etc. is enough for me to realise that people do see me for more than my face.

I AM still having trouble talking to girls, but i have some good female friends and they are constantly trying to make me feel better and boost my confidence.

You should still try to look nice, smell good (try valentino for men, its a great cologne), and talking to girls is a huge step in building confidence, so dont let that go!

Edited by colostomus

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hug recieved!biggrin.png feels warm and fuzzy like it should, thank you! i really do believe changing my perspective was the hardest part, but its also the most important one

I'm in agreement. And it's hard forever, even when you're doing so well sometimes the self-pity or loathing will creep back in. Relapsing is so depressing, you just gotta have the strength to pull yourself out of the bunny hole again.

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hug recieved!biggrin.png feels warm and fuzzy like it should, thank you! i really do believe changing my perspective was the hardest part, but its also the most important one

I'm in agreement. And it's hard forever, even when you're doing so well sometimes the self-pity or loathing will creep back in. Relapsing is so depressing, you just gotta have the strength to pull yourself out of the bunny hole again.

lol bunny hole, but yeah very very true

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I recently saw a therapist and she suggested I could take some sort of light medicine, although I'm sure that's neither the problem nor the solution to it.

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