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if you are white, stay away from vitamin d supplements unless you are in the middle of a long winter. since our melanin content in our skin is low, we are very effecient in getting d from sun exposure, and supplements only increase our risk of hypercalcemia due to high vitamin d levels. perhaps due to the colder climates we have evolved from this is why our skin is lighter and more effecient at making vitamin d. we also have higher rates of skin cancer because of lower melanin content http://www.cdc.gov/c...istics/race.htm, and are more prone to high blood calcium leading to pineal and kidney calcifications, here is a study of pineal calcification rates among white and black people from the same geographical region http://www.ajronline.../3/503.full.pdf. HIgher pineal calcification rates also put us at a higher risk of Multiple sclerosis, which have a 100% rate of pineal calcification. http://informahealth...207459108986271 . here is a list of risk factors for MS, one of which, is just being white http://www.mayoclini...ON=risk-factors, but now you may know why and how from the info i have just provided. only take vitamin d supplements either on cloudy days,but not every day, and perhaps only even when it is in the middle of winter, as your vitamin d stores may begin to decline. i have read in studies that even 1000 iu was enough to bring d levels to a very high range, even in people with crohns disease who have problems with absorbing fat soluble vitamins, so then if 1000 iu is enough for even crohns patients, any normal person should never consume more then 1000iu of vitamin d, particularly if you are white.

low magnesium also contributes to calcification of organs, eating processed grains or white bread can make it very hard to get magnesium. whole grains have more magnesium.

Edited by AutonomousOne1980

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Where in that is the support for excess vitamin D causing the calcification of the pineal gland? Also, the vitamin D council thinks most people need 3-5,000 IU per day if they aren't getting it from the sun to have adequate levels.

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I'm as white as they come in California, and my vitamin D levels were dangerously low on my last blood work (taken in the Spring, I'll add, during sunny weather). I had to get a prescription and get regular blood tests to make sure my levels reached an adequate range.

It's better to look at the numbers and not something as arbitrary as skin color. Skin color may suggest vitamin D absorption potential, but the reality is that proper vitamin D levels correlate to a more outdoor lifestyle (usually, just usually). So, if you're a vampire like me and avoid the sun to prevent getting burned, yeah I would take anywhere from 5,000 IU to 10,000 IU a day.

Edited by Vanbelle

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Where in that is the support for excess vitamin D causing the calcification of the pineal gland? Also, the vitamin D council thinks most people need 3-5,000 IU per day if they aren't getting it from the sun to have adequate levels.

I did not provide any direct references to high vitamin d levels ability to contribute to hypercalcemia,but it is a well know side effect of vit d toxicity. Nor have a provided direct evidence that it increases the risk of pineal calcification.Largely, it is my own interpretation of all the information in an attempt to explain why people with lighter skin, have greater pineal calcifications, but of course, i could be wrong and it wouldnt surprise me if i was wrong, but the information is interesting and gives some support.

i personally will keep my vitamin d levels low, but you are free to make your own decisions. the differences in pineal calcification rates could be due to more then just skin color, i am aware of this, other factors include consumption of calcium containing foods, magnesium deficiency and possibly fruit consumptions, like acid fruits that impede the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals, like tooth enamel, which is the same calcium formation that is found in the pineal gland.

I'm as white as they come in California, and my vitamin D levels were dangerously low on my last blood work (taken in the Spring, I'll add, during sunny weather). I had to get a prescription and get regular blood tests to make sure my levels reached an adequate range.

It's better to look at the numbers and not something as arbitrary as skin color. Skin color may suggest vitamin D absorption potential, but the reality is that proper vitamin D levels correlate to a more outdoor lifestyle (usually, just usually). So, if you're a vampire like me and avoid the sun to prevent getting burned, yeah I would take anywhere from 5,000 IU to 10,000 IU a day.

wouldnt your vampire like habits explain your low vitamin d levels?

Edited by AutonomousOne1980

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, other factors include consumption of calcium containing foods, magnesium deficiency and possibly fruit consumptions, like acid fruits that impede the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals, like tooth enamel, which is the same calcium formation that is found in the pineal gland.

...flouride?

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, other factors include consumption of calcium containing foods, magnesium deficiency and possibly fruit consumptions, like acid fruits that impede the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals, like tooth enamel, which is the same calcium formation that is found in the pineal gland.

...flouride?

good guess, but from what i have read it is the trace minerals , zinc, copper, manganese, and flouride, that are attracted to the calcium deposits, not the other way around. or i mean, these minerals only seem to accumulate after calcification has occurred.

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Another homegrown pseudo-intellectual who diagnose people over the internet. You have no idea about vitamin D serum levels of every white person here, yet you state firmly and authoritatively that white people houldn't take D supplements.

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