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Srananman

What Are Your Plans In Battling Scars?

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Hi there,

For most of us battling scars involves a lot of big steps and an even bigger story. After winning the battle of acne and getting clear, the war on scars is just starting. We have to overcome a lot of sadness, save up thousands of dollars and study the treatment options and loads of other material if we are to win this battle. Here's how I try to deal with it.

As for me, I'm finally coming closer to the day of my first treatment. I'm now 22 y/o and living with scars for nearly 10 years. Because of my tanned skin (half indian/half dutch), doctors used to say I had no option than to start dealing with my scars. With my mother being severly scarred, the strength and support was in-house to learn to cope with this situation and I fortunately managed to accept this way of life.

In the majority of the time I have been able to convert the mental pain into motivation and strength and found it amazing how great life can be, even with scars! To live successful lives as I see it, we have no choice than to focus on other talents and activities than we would have done without them. Still however, I am fully aware of the life that I am missing out on and the way scars are holding me back in living the life where I would be really happy with.

Acquiring the funds for effective treatments has always been very hard for me being a student. But the hard work I put in developing my ambitions (thanks scars) is starting to pay off and within 8 months I'll finally be in the position where the 'real' money comes in and the saving can start. The year that follows next simply has one goal; to get rid of the scars as much as possible and to start my new life!!

What is your experience in dealing with the mental difficulties of scars and what are your plans on getting rid of them?

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would be to wait 6 months to get off accutane, then another 6 months to make sure accutane is out of my system. After that I came to the conclusion that its not so much of the treatments, but of the skill of the doctor you pick, thats my only conclusion of why so may people have said theres nothing you can do. Either the doctor wasn't good enough, or maybe they are right. But i have to keep faith, not in a religious way but if i accept the fact that theres nothing i can do, i'm not going to be able to live this year. Bottom line would be to do your research as much as you can, then find not a good doctor, but the best. Save your money, it shouldn't be a option of how much it costs, this is no time to be cheap. Thats what i'm thinking, i'm 22 too. I'm thinking the doctor would be dr kahn in london from what i read on this forum, but i have a year to do the research. Also one thing i find is that you get depressed easy when all you do is think, we think and read about how hopeless the situation is (the imagination can do some great things and bad things for us), i think if we have to wait, then wait and take action. Start budgeting, do something that gets you there. Well i really hope the best for you guys who suffer this, i wish i had the cure and could actually do something, good luck

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I have darker skin (also Indian) and am going for a fractional c02 treatment next week.

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would be to wait 6 months to get off accutane, then another 6 months to make sure accutane is out of my system. After that I came to the conclusion that its not so much of the treatments, but of the skill of the doctor you pick, thats my only conclusion of why so may people have said theres nothing you can do. Either the doctor wasn't good enough, or maybe they are right. But i have to keep faith, not in a religious way but if i accept the fact that theres nothing i can do, i'm not going to be able to live this year. Bottom line would be to do your research as much as you can, then find not a good doctor, but the best. Save your money, it shouldn't be a option of how much it costs, this is no time to be cheap. Thats what i'm thinking, i'm 22 too. I'm thinking the doctor would be dr kahn in london from what i read on this forum, but i have a year to do the research. Also one thing i find is that you get depressed easy when all you do is think, we think and read about how hopeless the situation is (the imagination can do some great things and bad things for us), i think if we have to wait, then wait and take action. Start budgeting, do something that gets you there. Well i really hope the best for you guys who suffer this, i wish i had the cure and could actually do something, good luck

I can definately relate to your story there, I'm also on accutane again to be sure the pimples stay away. At least all the waiting time involved can be utilized to save up anything we can get our hands on ;). You're very right about the quality of the doctor that's involved; if you find another great doctor beside Khan, please let me know!

As for the depressions that come with our beloved scars, try to adopt a fitness schedule. Knowing that my days with a cleared skin are around the corner, I started training very heavy. Not only will I this way be able to get the best out of my future scarless life, it allready boosts my confidence NOW and I experience much less 'downtime' because of my scars. Wish you all the best in your journey, hope I'll hear some nice results on you in the future!

I have darker skin (also Indian) and am going for a fractional c02 treatment next week.

Are you going to combine that treatment with recell?

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I consider my scars to be severe. I admire anyone who lives with scars. Everyone from Danny Trejo (actor) to Christian Ziege (soccer player). I'm happy to be someone who lives with scars too. It becomes a part of who you are. I can relate to the mental aspect. I think the first step is to accept that you have scars and admit that your face is damaged. That's not going to change. Improvement's possible, tho, and since I have severe scars I think I can achieve severe improvement. Just a theory.

When I say severe scars, I mean that discolored skin is the least of my concerns. I have that. It's like, where all the skin on your face looks dead. What I'm mainly pissed about is the crevices. I'd estimate there's 15 to 20 scars on my chin, and the same goes for my forehead. Unlike most acne scar sufferers, my cheeks got off easy, but even then, there's damage, and in some pictures it even looks like some of my left cheek is missing.

So basically, to even out the skin, subcision sounds best. I've seen it give some people dramatic results. I have heard microneedling described as a verticle subicision, but when you think about fibrous bands pulling the skin down, cutting them horizontally sounds much more effective, with less extra damage. The only reason I would consider needling is because you can do it at home.

I refuse to have laser surgery, dermabrasion, chemical peels, anything like that. This dead looking skin seems to be extremely good at fighting acne, and it's probably protecting me from the sun too. No way I'm giving that up. It might go away over time, but even then, I don't want to mess with the top layer of skin and lessen its strength. Also, as I mentioned in the first paragraph, I value my scars as part of my appearance so I'm not trying to fix everything.

Excision is for individual scars, and I have way too many. So yes, subcision seems best. Only question is if my scars are too deep for subcision, but I think they're shallow enough to take a chance. If I could just plump up my skin in the most damaged areas, then I would be really happy.

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would be to wait 6 months to get off accutane, then another 6 months to make sure accutane is out of my system. After that I came to the conclusion that its not so much of the treatments, but of the skill of the doctor you pick, thats my only conclusion of why so may people have said theres nothing you can do. Either the doctor wasn't good enough, or maybe they are right. But i have to keep faith, not in a religious way but if i accept the fact that theres nothing i can do, i'm not going to be able to live this year. Bottom line would be to do your research as much as you can, then find not a good doctor, but the best. Save your money, it shouldn't be a option of how much it costs, this is no time to be cheap. Thats what i'm thinking, i'm 22 too. I'm thinking the doctor would be dr kahn in london from what i read on this forum, but i have a year to do the research. Also one thing i find is that you get depressed easy when all you do is think, we think and read about how hopeless the situation is (the imagination can do some great things and bad things for us), i think if we have to wait, then wait and take action. Start budgeting, do something that gets you there. Well i really hope the best for you guys who suffer this, i wish i had the cure and could actually do something, good luck

I can definately relate to your story there, I'm also on accutane again to be sure the pimples stay away. At least all the waiting time involved can be utilized to save up anything we can get our hands on wink.png. You're very right about the quality of the doctor that's involved; if you find another great doctor beside Khan, please let me know!

As for the depressions that come with our beloved scars, try to adopt a fitness schedule. Knowing that my days with a cleared skin are around the corner, I started training very heavy. Not only will I this way be able to get the best out of my future scarless life, it allready boosts my confidence NOW and I experience much less 'downtime' because of my scars. Wish you all the best in your journey, hope I'll hear some nice results on you in the future!

I have darker skin (also Indian) and am going for a fractional c02 treatment next week.

Are you going to combine that treatment with recell?

I don't think recell is available in the United States, so no.

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Well I've just joined this here forum, but thought I'd weigh in after reading a few posts.

First, a bit about me and my acne story. It pretty much began at age 12. A few small pimples began to pop up seemingly harmlessly on my forehead and chin. I can remember the feeling of irritation and being advised by my mum (who had been an acne sufferer herself as a teenager and beyond) which creams to apply, not to pick at the skin but when to squeeze a particularly ripe spot. I was quite vain about my appearance, always messing with my hair and looking in the mirror, though back then to be honest I didn't give acne a lot of thought. I vaguely knew that both my parents and my elder brother had all had acne as teenagers, and in the case of my father and brother, had emerged from it with no visible sign of its teenage presence. Although it got more and more extensive over the next year or so, I just took at as being a part of growing up.

It was probably only once I hit 13 or so that it got noticeably worse. I can remember a girl whose friend I had once gone out with suddenly announcing I 'looked ugly now I had spots' in the middle of a Maths lesson. That was a bit awkward. There were other comments, and I have to admit they were difficult but they also just seemed par for the course at secondary school - in some ways I think i got off quite lightly. I had friends, and though I hated school, things were never that bad at least as far as bullying or suchlike were concerned.

The acne worsened a bit over the next couple of years, and in conjunction with a lot of other issues, started to precipitate the first episode of depression that I had, at 15. I felt that my skin wouldn't clear up, girls would run from my spotty face screaming at the terrible sight they had been subjected to and I would be left alone, alone forever because of my skin. That nice, realistic, rational teenage thinking that we can all relate to! There was a lot else going on in my life, but I think the acne, or my reaction to it, was a major part of it. I took medication for the depression, and ended up back on antibiotics for the acne. I think I had 3 courses of oxytetracyclene without finishing a single one. With the depression, a terrible diet largely consisting of chocolate and sweets and starting minocin antibiotics, my skin seemed to get worse and worse until the point where severe inflammatory acne covered most of my face and forehead. Suddenly, rather than feeling simply spotty I could perceive that I looked unusual, and hated overhearing people's comments about my skin in public places. I was given an appointment to see a dermatologist fairly swiftly at that stage, and started Roaccutane in March 2001. I was a bit concerned about the side effects at first, but the drug worked like a dream. My acne faded almost completely in about 4 months, and from then on the new pimples, reduced as they were, pretty much stopped appearing too. I can remember the feeling of satisfaction in feeling that it was gone at last, and I can remember catching my reflection in mirrors and being pleased with what I saw instead of slightly appalled. It was the first time in my adult life that I had seen myself with clear skin. I almost looked as if I had a different face - suddenly it was a defined shape instead of being dominated by the admittedly unmissable acne.

The only real cloud on my horizon was that as the acne receded, some fairly extensive patches of scarring developed across my forehead and cheekbones. The post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (red marks 'n' that) was frustrating, but I figured that would fade with time. I was a lot more worried about the apparently indented marks that didn't look like they were going anywhere any time soon. To be honest, there was a part of me that blamed the Roaccutane - I mean it does make the skin more sensitive, doesn't it? Now I'm not so sure - I suspect that anyone who has acne of the level of severity that mine had been allowed to get to would be likely to be left with at least a bit of scarring and the Roaccutane was a real lifechanger, so I've no regrets even if it did contribute to any scarring.

Eventually the red marks did fade, though after about 2-3 years in total. In all honesty, as I feared would be the case, the acne did come back about 3-4 months after I finished the Roaccutane. With the benefit of hindsight I suspect I may not have stayed on it quite long enough - I was 16 and very eager to be able to go out and drink the night away and so agreed to come off it after 6 months since my skin had been clear for a little while with very little new acne to speak of. But it was confined to a few areas and has never reached anything like the severity that it had done prior to taking the drug.

Since 2002 I've just soldiered on without doing anything medical to the acne. I don't really use any products as I felt these did more harm than good in the long run - so am intrigued by 'the regimen' (I remember reading about it on the internet in 2000, and did try it for a while before I concluded I was going mental with the Benzoyl Peroxide and should probably stop before my face burned off, I'm sure not the intention of the site and not the correct application of the principles! - the site has grown up out of recognition from those days). It seems to come and go, gets worse when I'm run down, stressed, tired etc. I keep to a fairly strict diet, I stopped eating chocolate and drinking fizzy drinks around the time of the Roaccutane and I cut out milk a while ago when I realised that seemed to cause some flare-ups. After a few life changes, including a broken relationship and some other stuff, I've pretty much decided to address the acne issue in a more systematic way, having put it off for years. I'm currently 26 and at the moment have a few small spots on my cheeks and around my mouth and some whiteheads on my chin. My plan is, and this is very optimistically assuming my GP will agree, to try to get back on the Accutane to clear up the remaining acne, wait a while, and then look to get something done with the scarring after a year or so to let my skin settle down again. The main issue is my forehead, which has a lot of quite shallow scarring, especially in the centre, which in the wrong light gives it a sort of wavy appearance, as if I've had some kind of burns earlier in life that I really don't like. My cheeks also have some fairly extensive but shallow scarring. The only very deep scars I seem to have are on my temples. I've pretty much written these off, and I could live with some scarring up there to be honest, it's just getting the wavy effect off my forehead and cheeks that I'm interested in. I don't know what a dermatologist would be likely to recommend. I'd be disappointed if nothing can be done to improve it at all - but any improvement would be a bonus, and although I am still fairly sensitive about my skin and the scarred areas, I'm not banking on it having to get massively better for me to live a pretty much normal life.

I was very, very neurotic about my skin between about 16-20 and spent hours thinking I was the most scarred person who ever lived, and ended up almost pyschotically believing I was seriously deformed because of my scarring, so I can relate to anyone on here who is affected by it. However, on the other hand I would struggle to post a picture which shows the scarring as I don't really have any - it just doesn't show up that much in photo graphs or from a distance in the mirror other than in very bad light (usually when it's dark and it's being lit from above) and the only way it has stopped me living a normal life is through my perceptions of it, not through the reaction of others. No-one has ever called me names or mentioned the scarring, which leads me to think, though I think it's pretty severe, that it just isn't that big a deal compared to having the kind of acne I had. For that at least, I'm grateful.

This is super long. Wow. If you've got this far I hope it's been in any way interesting. If not, then that's five minutes of your life you won't get back and so I apologise.

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would be to wait 6 months to get off accutane, then another 6 months to make sure accutane is out of my system. After that I came to the conclusion that its not so much of the treatments, but of the skill of the doctor you pick, thats my only conclusion of why so may people have said theres nothing you can do. Either the doctor wasn't good enough, or maybe they are right. But i have to keep faith, not in a religious way but if i accept the fact that theres nothing i can do, i'm not going to be able to live this year. Bottom line would be to do your research as much as you can, then find not a good doctor, but the best. Save your money, it shouldn't be a option of how much it costs, this is no time to be cheap. Thats what i'm thinking, i'm 22 too. I'm thinking the doctor would be dr kahn in london from what i read on this forum, but i have a year to do the research. Also one thing i find is that you get depressed easy when all you do is think, we think and read about how hopeless the situation is (the imagination can do some great things and bad things for us), i think if we have to wait, then wait and take action. Start budgeting, do something that gets you there. Well i really hope the best for you guys who suffer this, i wish i had the cure and could actually do something, good luck

I can definately relate to your story there, I'm also on accutane again to be sure the pimples stay away. At least all the waiting time involved can be utilized to save up anything we can get our hands on wink.png. You're very right about the quality of the doctor that's involved; if you find another great doctor beside Khan, please let me know!

As for the depressions that come with our beloved scars, try to adopt a fitness schedule. Knowing that my days with a cleared skin are around the corner, I started training very heavy. Not only will I this way be able to get the best out of my future scarless life, it allready boosts my confidence NOW and I experience much less 'downtime' because of my scars. Wish you all the best in your journey, hope I'll hear some nice results on you in the future!

I have darker skin (also Indian) and am going for a fractional c02 treatment next week.

Are you going to combine that treatment with recell?

Thanks ish, i hope the best for you too and to everyone else.

I'm Native american also, luckily i'm mixed, so I'm half white? I'd say the same color as asians, olive. I was thinking that the best option would be a fractional:repair (i read that 1 of these are 4-5 fractional: restores) along with recell, and maybe a subcision on my deeper scars would be a good bet (2 scars that look as if i was cut, although i have zero med experience so the doc might disagree. I also read that stem cell research is within single digit years away ( 1-9), but honestly thats like watching paint to dry, and theres a good chance it will become 20 years away, by that time our youth will be gone. I read that a user named "fourmurasame" has had 90% success and hers was pretty bad, and she was of a darker color like us. Honesty I'm not aiming for perfection, because nothing is, i want 70% if its possible. I'm worried that after this accutane course is over i'll have more scars.

Well I've just joined this here forum, but thought I'd weigh in after reading a few posts.

First, a bit about me and my acne story. It pretty much began at age 12. A few small pimples began to pop up seemingly harmlessly on my forehead and chin. I can remember the feeling of irritation and being advised by my mum (who had been an acne sufferer herself as a teenager and beyond) which creams to apply, not to pick at the skin but when to squeeze a particularly ripe spot. I was quite vain about my appearance, always messing with my hair and looking in the mirror, though back then to be honest I didn't give acne a lot of thought. I vaguely knew that both my parents and my elder brother had all had acne as teenagers, and in the case of my father and brother, had emerged from it with no visible sign of its teenage presence. Although it got more and more extensive over the next year or so, I just took at as being a part of growing up.

It was probably only once I hit 13 or so that it got noticeably worse. I can remember a girl whose friend I had once gone out with suddenly announcing I 'looked ugly now I had spots' in the middle of a Maths lesson. That was a bit awkward. There were other comments, and I have to admit they were difficult but they also just seemed par for the course at secondary school - in some ways I think i got off quite lightly. I had friends, and though I hated school, things were never that bad at least as far as bullying or suchlike were concerned.

The acne worsened a bit over the next couple of years, and in conjunction with a lot of other issues, started to precipitate the first episode of depression that I had, at 15. I felt that my skin wouldn't clear up, girls would run from my spotty face screaming at the terrible sight they had been subjected to and I would be left alone, alone forever because of my skin. That nice, realistic, rational teenage thinking that we can all relate to! There was a lot else going on in my life, but I think the acne, or my reaction to it, was a major part of it. I took medication for the depression, and ended up back on antibiotics for the acne. I think I had 3 courses of oxytetracyclene without finishing a single one. With the depression, a terrible diet largely consisting of chocolate and sweets and starting minocin antibiotics, my skin seemed to get worse and worse until the point where severe inflammatory acne covered most of my face and forehead. Suddenly, rather than feeling simply spotty I could perceive that I looked unusual, and hated overhearing people's comments about my skin in public places. I was given an appointment to see a dermatologist fairly swiftly at that stage, and started Roaccutane in March 2001. I was a bit concerned about the side effects at first, but the drug worked like a dream. My acne faded almost completely in about 4 months, and from then on the new pimples, reduced as they were, pretty much stopped appearing too. I can remember the feeling of satisfaction in feeling that it was gone at last, and I can remember catching my reflection in mirrors and being pleased with what I saw instead of slightly appalled. It was the first time in my adult life that I had seen myself with clear skin. I almost looked as if I had a different face - suddenly it was a defined shape instead of being dominated by the admittedly unmissable acne.

The only real cloud on my horizon was that as the acne receded, some fairly extensive patches of scarring developed across my forehead and cheekbones. The post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (red marks 'n' that) was frustrating, but I figured that would fade with time. I was a lot more worried about the apparently indented marks that didn't look like they were going anywhere any time soon. To be honest, there was a part of me that blamed the Roaccutane - I mean it does make the skin more sensitive, doesn't it? Now I'm not so sure - I suspect that anyone who has acne of the level of severity that mine had been allowed to get to would be likely to be left with at least a bit of scarring and the Roaccutane was a real lifechanger, so I've no regrets even if it did contribute to any scarring.

Eventually the red marks did fade, though after about 2-3 years in total. In all honesty, as I feared would be the case, the acne did come back about 3-4 months after I finished the Roaccutane. With the benefit of hindsight I suspect I may not have stayed on it quite long enough - I was 16 and very eager to be able to go out and drink the night away and so agreed to come off it after 6 months since my skin had been clear for a little while with very little new acne to speak of. But it was confined to a few areas and has never reached anything like the severity that it had done prior to taking the drug.

Since 2002 I've just soldiered on without doing anything medical to the acne. I don't really use any products as I felt these did more harm than good in the long run - so am intrigued by 'the regimen' (I remember reading about it on the internet in 2000, and did try it for a while before I concluded I was going mental with the Benzoyl Peroxide and should probably stop before my face burned off, I'm sure not the intention of the site and not the correct application of the principles! - the site has grown up out of recognition from those days). It seems to come and go, gets worse when I'm run down, stressed, tired etc. I keep to a fairly strict diet, I stopped eating chocolate and drinking fizzy drinks around the time of the Roaccutane and I cut out milk a while ago when I realised that seemed to cause some flare-ups. After a few life changes, including a broken relationship and some other stuff, I've pretty much decided to address the acne issue in a more systematic way, having put it off for years. I'm currently 26 and at the moment have a few small spots on my cheeks and around my mouth and some whiteheads on my chin. My plan is, and this is very optimistically assuming my GP will agree, to try to get back on the Accutane to clear up the remaining acne, wait a while, and then look to get something done with the scarring after a year or so to let my skin settle down again. The main issue is my forehead, which has a lot of quite shallow scarring, especially in the centre, which in the wrong light gives it a sort of wavy appearance, as if I've had some kind of burns earlier in life that I really don't like. My cheeks also have some fairly extensive but shallow scarring. The only very deep scars I seem to have are on my temples. I've pretty much written these off, and I could live with some scarring up there to be honest, it's just getting the wavy effect off my forehead and cheeks that I'm interested in. I don't know what a dermatologist would be likely to recommend. I'd be disappointed if nothing can be done to improve it at all - but any improvement would be a bonus, and although I am still fairly sensitive about my skin and the scarred areas, I'm not banking on it having to get massively better for me to live a pretty much normal life.

I was very, very neurotic about my skin between about 16-20 and spent hours thinking I was the most scarred person who ever lived, and ended up almost pyschotically believing I was seriously deformed because of my scarring, so I can relate to anyone on here who is affected by it. However, on the other hand I would struggle to post a picture which shows the scarring as I don't really have any - it just doesn't show up that much in photo graphs or from a distance in the mirror other than in very bad light (usually when it's dark and it's being lit from above) and the only way it has stopped me living a normal life is through my perceptions of it, not through the reaction of others. No-one has ever called me names or mentioned the scarring, which leads me to think, though I think it's pretty severe, that it just isn't that big a deal compared to having the kind of acne I had. For that at least, I'm grateful.

This is super long. Wow. If you've got this far I hope it's been in any way interesting. If not, then that's five minutes of your life you won't get back and so I apologise.

Same with me, i thought acne was just part of life.

I'm planning to go into biology next year because I guess i was naive in thinking todays medical technology could do wonders, but it really hasn't come to that yet, not close. Which makes me go into stem cell research and help the field out. Sorry if i'm talking about myself to much, i don't mean to be selfish, if i could i wish i had the cure for all of you, noone deserves this.

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Guest Timehealsall

to be honest i have no fucking clue. No clue.

I dont even know what scars i have

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to be honest i have no fucking clue. No clue.

I dont even know what scars i have

Time to start making plans again then. You've been through a lot of treatments already right?

As for me, I quitted taking accutane last week. The side effects really got on to me and I got quite depressed and then even more depressed by reading all these horror stories about it. Fortunately, my serotonine production accelerated again and I'm feeling happy now hehe. I'm now cutting diary in my diet as I think its a major trigger for me that causes acne. For the rest.. just 1 year left before I'll take the combo treatment and hopefully another one after that :)

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