Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
jaysjay

topical spironolactone

we all know the remarkable cut down in sebum prduction that is assosiated with the systemic use of spironolactone, cant be achived by anything else barring accutane-as far as i have read of it,unfortunatly oral spironolactone has also been yet a taboo for males owing to its gyno effects,do you think that topical use of spironolactone would render the same effect locally on sebum production without the same dangers related to its systemic use ,and would that also mean decrease in facial hair ????or on the contrary it would it would aid facial hair growth as it helps scalp hair,???? anybody who can answer please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No I don't think so. It's mechanism is to reduce androgens, which in turn reduces sebum production. I don't think it would have any localized effects and you'd still be risking it getting into your blood stream, which would probably lead to feminization.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's not true. Aldactone acts as a DHT receptor blocker. That means it will attach itself to the receptor sites on the skin so that androgen can't. While women can use it systemically to achieve this affect, men can also use it topically to achieve localized effects. Topical spiro 5% has been tested and proved to be effective in the treatment of testosterone induced acne for males with little or no resulting detectable blood levels. It is important to know that aldactone cannot treat acne that is a result of skin irritation or improper facial cleansing habits. In other words it does not remove dirt or kill germs and is usually the most effective in conjunction with antibiotics and regular face washing. Thankfully, these androgen receptors that can cause acne are very superficial, near the sebaceous glands. As you know the sebaceous glands produce sebum, which clogs pores and causes pimples. Androgen over activates these glands and they begin producing a surplus of oil and sebum. If topical spiro is applied to clean, dry, skin and massaged in completely with clean hands it will begin binding to the receptor sites of the skin and inhibit the effects of androgen. This process does take time and dedication. You have to keep in mind that some sites already have bound androgen and you have to remain persistent so that when that site releases the androgen the spiro is there to take its place. Also you have to maintain a consistent level of available spiro at all times. That way as new receptor sites become available spiro is there to bind. Studies were done on the efficacy and side effects of spiro on males. At the end of the trial period both cases showed improvement without any substantial systemic effects. However, the areas that received treatment did have some loss in body hair. Natures androgen blocker is estrogen. Which is why spiro is so effective in women with inadequate hormone levels. Spiro is blocking the androgen that estrogen couldn't. Remember men also have estrogen in low numbers. A small amount is not going to cause feminization. Like any drug, it is important to know the therapeutic effect and the side effect and determine if one out weighs the other. I am NOT a doctor. I have personal experience with aldactone and have done a substantial amount of research on off label uses of pharmaceuticals as a pharmacy technician.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.s. scalp hair and body hair are not controlled by all of the same genes and hormones. That is why a man can inherit male pattern baldness and have massive amounts of body hair. Or you will see a man with blonde hair and a reddish beard. Androgen tends to cause male pattern baldness and increased body hair. So to answer your question, yes, if you apply spiranolactone to areas that have facial or body hair it can decrease or stop growth there all together. On the contrary, on your scalp, androgen actually causes hair loss and application of spiro can actually lead to increased hair growth. That is why spiro has been used to treat hair loss. Do not misinterpret, some of your genes and hormones do affect both. But not necessarily in the same manner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×