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Kitten35

So I tried an experiment...

...I've been vegetarian for about eight months to a year. It has helped me clear my skin significantly. I would get the occasional pimple or two, especially in summer (here it's so humid, your face feels like it will melt off). But much, much improved. I eat a 40% fat (good fats), 20% protein, and 40% carb ratio, generally. I make sure most of it is high-protein (probably getting around 100 or more g a day, plenty for my weight of 128 lbs), and low GI. Regularly I eat around 2K cals a day.

Last Friday, out of curiosity of "what would happen" and if I would feel sick or break out, I ate some meat for lunch. Straight meat. Turkey and beef. A few slices of deli meat and quite a few beef meatballs. And some regular milk (which I don't drink either, though I do eat Greek Yogurt and some organic butter for fat, vitamins and calories).

For the past five days, I have been breaking out like crazy. The big, inflammed kind of pimples.

I really now believe for sure it's meat that causes my inflammed, huge pimples. I got about three very large ones between Sunday and today. I also, honestly, really didn't feel too good after I ate it. Not like throwing up, but just lethargic.

Is there ANY scientific reason for this? Why would it cause me to break out? Not that I mind being veg--I actually really like it so I don't really miss meat--never was big on it anyway--but why in the world???

Edited by Kitten35

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I don't really know much about this- but I know my friend is a strict vegetarian, has been for years, and she has pretty bad acne. But it could have a connection with you. Maybe the meat made your skin greasier? :eh:

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I really don't know! It's so wierd, especially with all the Paleo dieters on here who have no problem at all. But I really wanted to try it, to see what would happen, after quite a long time with no meat, and voila, pimples.

It's absolutely insane.

I did try to go vegan for about three weeks to see what would happen, but I did not like it, as I didn't like eating that heavy-carbs, and I also noticed my skin broke out more. I was also a lot hungrier, presumably the lower fat. I find for me the best is a high-fat, relatively high calorie lacto-ovo.

Just curious about the meat though. Wonder if it's the hormones, or just my personal body's reaction to something in it (maybe Uric acid? Although I eat eggs and dairy). Wondered if there was any research behind it for some people the way there was behind dairy.

Edited by Kitten35

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If its not grass fed meat and dairy, it will break out your skin. although, some people cannot tolerate dairy, grass fed meat rarely causes inflammation.

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As an ex-vegetarian, one of the best choices I made for my health and skin was to go back to eating meat and fish. Quite literally within a few weeks of eating meat again, my hair stopped shedding and became thicker and my overall skin texture just became so much better.

However, the meat I eat is all organic, grass-fed and free-range. It's better to get in touch with local farmers rather than try to find ideal meat in stores. If the meat you eat is crappy, it will have whatever toxins are in the feed and whatever toxins they're giving the animal. Many modern animals are fed grain diets, which completely screws up their omega-6 ratio, which in turn means you're ingesting more Omega-6s by eating the meat.

As for the tired feeling after eating meat, that's probably because as a vegetarian, you're not used to having to digest meat (which contains more protein and thus requires more stomach acid and various processes to digest properly.) I had the same thing when I switched from a vegetarian to eating meat again and it went away within probably like 2 weeks. I started eating only chicken and fish first. Then after a while, I added red meat back in and after that everything seemed to be fine.

I would also recommend marinating your meat with vinegar or lemon juice to make it slightly easier to digest. Digestive enzyme supplements should help as well.

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As an ex-vegetarian, one of the best choices I made for my health and skin was to go back to eating meat and fish. and my overall skin texture just became so much better.

This. and pretty much everything else he said. Buy quality food. Deli slices and meatballs is far from quality ;)

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...I've been vegetarian for about eight months to a year. It has helped me clear my skin significantly. I would get the occasional pimple or two, especially in summer (here it's so humid, your face feels like it will melt off). But much, much improved. I eat a 40% fat (good fats), 20% protein, and 40% carb ratio, generally. I make sure most of it is high-protein (probably getting around 100 or more g a day, plenty for my weight of 128 lbs), and low GI. Regularly I eat around 2K cals a day.

Last Friday, out of curiosity of "what would happen" and if I would feel sick or break out, I ate some meat for lunch. Straight meat. Turkey and beef. A few slices of deli meat and quite a few beef meatballs. And some regular milk (which I don't drink either, though I do eat Greek Yogurt and some organic butter for fat, vitamins and calories).

For the past five days, I have been breaking out like crazy. The big, inflammed kind of pimples.

I really now believe for sure it's meat that causes my inflammed, huge pimples. I got about three very large ones between Sunday and today. I also, honestly, really didn't feel too good after I ate it. Not like throwing up, but just lethargic.

Is there ANY scientific reason for this? Why would it cause me to break out? Not that I mind being veg--I actually really like it so I don't really miss meat--never was big on it anyway--but why in the world???

How in the world are you eating 40% fat on a vegetarian diet? Your omega-6 intake must be through the roof!! Unless you are guzzling coconut oil...

I am really curious what ingredients were in your "deli meat" turkey, and whether or not you made those meatballs yourself (...subway?).

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I also, honestly, really didn't feel too good after I ate it. Not like throwing up, but just lethargic.

Is there ANY scientific reason for this?

As for the tired feeling after eating meat, that's probably because as a vegetarian, you're not used to having to digest meat

This is true. Digestion falls under the domain of the parasympathetic nervous system, which in addition to controlling digestive processes, is responsible for making us feel tired or calm. In addition, digestion requires blood to be shunted to the intestines, which leaves less blood for the remainder of the body. Since blood carries oxygen, glucose, etc., this can make you feel weak.

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As an ex-vegetarian, one of the best choices I made for my health and skin was to go back to eating meat and fish. and my overall skin texture just became so much better.

This. and pretty much everything else he said. Buy quality food. Deli slices and meatballs is far from quality ;)

I know a couple of vegetarians who buy cheapest vegetables of the lousiest quality you could imagine and still sneer at meat-eaters. It's pointless to try to explain them that quality of food is of importance :redface:

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I do know that quality of meat and food in general is important. If I ever do return to meat eating, I will only be buying organic, free-range and grass fed animal products. That is all I buy now--my eggs I buy from a local farmer who has shown me the feeding and living grounds, and for my dairy (which as I mentioned is organic butter and organic yogurt, only. Sometimes also kefir...but again, only organic). I wanted to say that because I didn't really appreciate the snarky assumptions that I knew nothing of food quality (for the record I get much of my produce directly from the farmer or farmer's distributor too) or that I somehow eat out at fast food for the majority of my diet. I make almost everything myself, including, now, my own energy bars, and track my diet on a regular basis to make sure I get the proper ratio of things.

I simply wanted to see what would happen. I was not seriously considering returning to a meat diet, or I would have done a much longer (and higher quality meat) experiment. I wanted to see if I would break out if I ate some meat. That's it. I am aware that deli meat (which I never even liked as a meat eater!) and meatballs are not a quality dietary choice, nor are they grass-fed or free-range. It's what we had laying around the house for my husband, so I tried it. I did find it odd that such a small amount could affect me in such a way, however--it took me about five days to not get any new pimples. This week, I have had no new breakouts.

I eat quite a few nuts and seeds, probably 1/2 cup a day, and use olive and coconut oil, as well as some butter, and some organic 86% dark chocolate from time to time, which is how I have such a high fat ratio. It is not hard to get that ratio of fats. I personally do not seem to have problems with nuts, seeds, soy (mostly fermented such as tempeh), or wheat. I also do usually get the fuller-fat dairy if I am going to eat it. I take an omega-3 supplement.

I personally feel very healthy on the vegetarian diet and my blood test checked out (with the exception of fat ratio too low, which is why I eat more now), and my skin looks great most of the time. I'm not demonizing anyone for eating meat--there is nothing wrong with that if it works for you--and I am not trying to "propagandize" anyone, I was simply asking if there was a reason that meat may cause breakouts. I was curious if it was just the grain-fed aspect, or if my body personally just has a problem with the high level of Uric acid or something, or simply the fact that it is more difficult to digest may be affecting me in some way. I was just curious.

Edited by Kitten35

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As an ex-vegetarian, one of the best choices I made for my health and skin was to go back to eating meat and fish. Quite literally within a few weeks of eating meat again, my hair stopped shedding and became thicker and my overall skin texture just became so much better.

However, the meat I eat is all organic, grass-fed and free-range. It's better to get in touch with local farmers rather than try to find ideal meat in stores. If the meat you eat is crappy, it will have whatever toxins are in the feed and whatever toxins they're giving the animal. Many modern animals are fed grain diets, which completely screws up their omega-6 ratio, which in turn means you're ingesting more Omega-6s by eating the meat.

As for the tired feeling after eating meat, that's probably because as a vegetarian, you're not used to having to digest meat (which contains more protein and thus requires more stomach acid and various processes to digest properly.) I had the same thing when I switched from a vegetarian to eating meat again and it went away within probably like 2 weeks. I started eating only chicken and fish first. Then after a while, I added red meat back in and after that everything seemed to be fine.

I would also recommend marinating your meat with vinegar or lemon juice to make it slightly easier to digest. Digestive enzyme supplements should help as well.

Did you gain much weight when you made the switch?

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...I've been vegetarian for about eight months to a year. It has helped me clear my skin significantly. I would get the occasional pimple or two, especially in summer (here it's so humid, your face feels like it will melt off). But much, much improved. I eat a 40% fat (good fats), 20% protein, and 40% carb ratio, generally. I make sure most of it is high-protein (probably getting around 100 or more g a day, plenty for my weight of 128 lbs), and low GI. Regularly I eat around 2K cals a day.

Last Friday, out of curiosity of "what would happen" and if I would feel sick or break out, I ate some meat for lunch. Straight meat. Turkey and beef. A few slices of deli meat and quite a few beef meatballs. And some regular milk (which I don't drink either, though I do eat Greek Yogurt and some organic butter for fat, vitamins and calories).

For the past five days, I have been breaking out like crazy. The big, inflammed kind of pimples.

I really now believe for sure it's meat that causes my inflammed, huge pimples. I got about three very large ones between Sunday and today. I also, honestly, really didn't feel too good after I ate it. Not like throwing up, but just lethargic.

Is there ANY scientific reason for this? Why would it cause me to break out? Not that I mind being veg--I actually really like it so I don't really miss meat--never was big on it anyway--but why in the world???

what blood type are you? a an b shouldt eat much meat an b shouldt eat chicken acording to this book I mentioned. aside from that lots of shite quality meats are filled with hormones in the US. Here me cousin rasies his own chickens an cows an doesnt feed them none of that kind of junk. But it is fairly common unfortunately to give it to the animals.

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The doctor (Dr. Leung) who came up with the vitamin B5 overdose theory stated in his report that excess sebum is produced when your body doesn't metabolise excess fats, as they are pushed out onto the skin. When you overdose on vitamin B5, through some complex series of reactions these fats are able to be metabolised. The doctor definitely knows what he's talking about since overdosing on vitamin B5 certainly works and will significantly reduce sebum production.

"In this paper, I would like to approach this problem from a different perspective. My clinical observations suggest that acne vulgaris may be closely related to the consumption of diets, which are rich in fat content. This impression is by no means novel. Textbooks do briefly mention this correlation though, more often than not, it is dismissed as irrelevant. However, my observations have led to quite the contrary conclusions. Not only is the fat content of food closely related to acne vulgaris but it forms some sort of linear relationship with the disease process. The more fat the patient consumes, the more severe will be the acne process."

http://www.acnemiracle.com/study.html

I'd wager a guess that since meats are high in fats, the less meat you ingest would result in less sebum production, and hence less acne.

Edited by Beautiful Day

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The doctor (Dr. Leung) who came up with the vitamin B5 overdose theory stated in his report that excess sebum is produced when your body doesn't metabolise excess fats, as they are pushed out onto the skin. When you overdose on vitamin B5, through some complex series of reactions these fats are able to be metabolised. The doctor definitely knows what he's talking about since overdosing on vitamin B5 certainly works and will significantly reduce sebum production.

"In this paper, I would like to approach this problem from a different perspective. My clinical observations suggest that acne vulgaris may be closely related to the consumption of diets, which are rich in fat content. This impression is by no means novel. Textbooks do briefly mention this correlation though, more often than not, it is dismissed as irrelevant. However, my observations have led to quite the contrary conclusions. Not only is the fat content of food closely related to acne vulgaris but it forms some sort of linear relationship with the disease process. The more fat the patient consumes, the more severe will be the acne process."

http://www.acnemiracle.com/study.html

I'd wager a guess that since meats are high in fats, the less meat you ingest would result in less sebum production, and hence less acne.

I think a better candidate would be excess sugar/carbohydrate consumption and the spike in blood sugar leading to a host of other problems.

How many people do you know that eat a lot of fat? I don't think I've ever met anyone who gets a LOT of fat in their diet, certainly not too much, but I do know plenty of people are fat and their diets are virtually all carbs (which convert to body fat.)

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