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LanceBoyle

Natural Selection Applied to Skin Cells.

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The last several decades have seen a paradigm shift in our understanding of human skin. It is no longer a simple material, but a fantastically complex and vital organ that responds to both its environment and the body in surprising ways...

Well, I'm taking a step backwards. I say the skin is a material that happens to be composed of cells.

What is a blemish but a reaction of the skin to the body or environment? And what if the skin could not react? Would it still be skin?

Casting aside these ahnungsvolle Gefühlen, I have concocted a solution of 5% salicylic acid and 1% volume tetrahydrofuran in reagent grade isopropyl alcohol that could pickle a rhino. This I apply to my face 21 times a day, under the fundamental assumption that the "weak" environmentally-responsive skin cells will die, and the skin to replace them will be so tough that it will not be any more likely to break out than my leather desk chair. My skin, you might say, shall become more akin to a base material than a living organ. On the other hand, you might call it a transcendental "super-skin" to which both external and internal stressors have become irrelevant.

So I'll continue with my little experiment, though as of right now I do admit I'm quite uncomfortable. In several weeks we shall see whether I've anything left with which to cover my skull.

Regards,

Lance Boyle

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I don't know if you'll live long enough for significant evolutionary mutations to occur in your skin, but good luck anyway.

PS - love the name Lance Boyle! :D

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I'm sorry but, what degree do you have to make these claims?

I'd be inclined to say that the only way this is possible, is in some ridiculous sci-fi movie stretching the theory of epigenetics.

Natural selection can only be applied to a population. The underlying DNA of an organism will remain. For example, let's say you do have skin cells that survive this "process." This either means 1) nothing, or 2) by some friggin miracle, they actually do possess some genetic mutation in their DNA structure to survive. The mutation will only exist within those cells, and your true DNA will still produce normal cells.

This is ridiculous, I'm sorry. I can't believe you would see any proper mutation occur in an isolated area on your face, within the span of even 5 lifetimes. And, would your skin magically keep producing cells only where you applied that topical cream?

Mutations are 1 in a billion by the way. And evolution is not a mechanism you can accelerate, but a delicate structure.

I mean, geeze, I probably have mutated cells too! Gasp! And everyone who uses salicylic acid for that matter! No wonder it keeps working...???

This has to be a troll. Your face is going to get raw bro.

Edited by Sarah.

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I'm sorry but, what degree do you have to make these claims?

I'd be inclined to say that the only way this is possible, is in some ridiculous sci-fi movie stretching the theory of epigenetics.

Natural selection can only be applied to a population. The underlying DNA of an organism will remain. For example, let's say you do have skin cells that survive this "process." This either means 1) nothing, or 2) by some friggin miracle, they actually do possess some genetic mutation in their DNA structure to survive. The mutation will only exist within those cells, and your true DNA will still produce normal cells.

This is ridiculous, I'm sorry. I can't believe you would see any proper mutation occur in an isolated area on your face, within the span of even 5 lifetimes. And, would your skin magically keeps producing cells only where you applied that topical cream?

Mutations are 1 in a billion by the way. And evolution is not a mechanism you can accelerate, but a delicate structure.

I mean, geeze, I probably have mutated cells too! Gasp! And everyone who uses salicylic acid for that matter! No wonder it keeps working...???

This has to be a troll. Your face is going to get raw bro.

You are absolutely correct. In truth this is not "natural selection," but the overall process is analogous. Skin is composed of many phenotypically different types of cells, and perhaps one can be brought to prominence by killing the others. My hypothesis is simply that the cells to survive this process will naturally be more resilient and less responsive to the environment, and therefore less likely to break out. Yes, my skin will become "raw" at first. But as the skin regenerates, only the cells capable of surviving the concoction will survive and divide. Ironically, it is my skin's very responsiveness to the environment that I am using to bring about a leathery and unresponsive state.

"Degree?" - I am 17.

"Troll?" - Not quite, but I may end up looking like one. However, I don't have a great deal to lose.

Look, if leprous legions of lesions lurk on your face, you better do something big about it.

Edited by LanceBoyle

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"Fifteen men on a dead man's chest,

Yo, ho ho and a bottle of rum!

Drink and the Devil had done for the rest,

Yo, ho ho and a bottle of rum!"

Alas, dear friends, isopropyl alcohol, I fear, is readily absorbed through the skin. I find the effect similar to being simultaneously intoxicated and hung-over. By Jove, I certainly hadn't anticipated this. I will revise my choice of solvents and post my revised regimen shortly.

Happy lancing,

Sir Boyle

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I'm sorry but, what degree do you have to make these claims?

I'd be inclined to say that the only way this is possible, is in some ridiculous sci-fi movie stretching the theory of epigenetics.

Natural selection can only be applied to a population. The underlying DNA of an organism will remain. For example, let's say you do have skin cells that survive this "process." This either means 1) nothing, or 2) by some friggin miracle, they actually do possess some genetic mutation in their DNA structure to survive. The mutation will only exist within those cells, and your true DNA will still produce normal cells.

This is ridiculous, I'm sorry. I can't believe you would see any proper mutation occur in an isolated area on your face, within the span of even 5 lifetimes. And, would your skin magically keeps producing cells only where you applied that topical cream?

Mutations are 1 in a billion by the way. And evolution is not a mechanism you can accelerate, but a delicate structure.

I mean, geeze, I probably have mutated cells too! Gasp! And everyone who uses salicylic acid for that matter! No wonder it keeps working...???

This has to be a troll. Your face is going to get raw bro.

You are absolutely correct. In truth this is not "natural selection," but the overall process is analogous. Skin is composed of many phenotypically different types of cells, and perhaps one can be brought to prominence by killing the others. My hypothesis is simply that the cells to survive this process will naturally be more resilient and less responsive to the environment, and therefore less likely to break out. Yes, my skin will become "raw" at first. But as the skin regenerates, only the cells capable of surviving the concoction will survive and divide. Ironically, it is my skin's very responsiveness to the environment that I am using to bring about a leathery and unresponsive state.

"Degree?" - I am 17.

"Troll?" - Not quite, but I may end up looking like one. However, I don't have a great deal to lose.

Look, if leprous legions of lesions lurk on your face, you better do something big about it.

Dude, no. This is riddled with incorrect assumptions. You are trying to induce epigenetics. But it won't happen. And plus, resilient skin that can withstand this process doesn't mean it will inherently get rid of acne anyway.

Acne is symptomatic of a larger issue.

One small square inch contains:

19,000 nerve cells,

1250 pain receptors,

19 yards of blood vessels!

625 sweat glands,

94 sebaceous glands,

60 hairs,

and approximately 19 million cells.

The epidermis or outer layer provides a barrier of protection from foreign particles. It varies in thickness on different parts of the body and is thickest on the soles of the feet and the hands. It is made up of cells called keratinocytes and has its own multiple layers or strata:

The Stratum Corneum (SC) (horny layer) is what you might visualize if you were told to think of what the skin actually looks like. It is made up of scale-like cells which contain keratin. They are packed tightly together and are continually being replaced by new cells underneath. This is what you slough off when you use an abrasive cleanser or cleaning tool. The Stratum Corneum layer is slightly acidic and is often referred to as the acid mantle of the skin.

PH is important to understand because the proper pH level can prevent bacteria from penetrating the skin. Bacteria thinks acid is bad. Many companies stress balanced pH levels in the promotion of their skin care products for good reason. It is important for you to use products that do not strip the acid mantle or alter its pH in a harmful manner. So you could have potentially have occasional blackheads (blocked pores) on your skin from normal overproduction of sebum that would never go any further unless your acid mantle's pH is compromised for some reason.

The Stratum Lucidum (SL) (clear layer) is very thin and only well seen where hair folicles are not present and the skin is especially thick, such as the palm of the hand or soles of the feet.

The Stratum Granulosum (SGR) (granular layer) is a median layer of cells which provide a hard substance and waterproof barrier to prevent body fluid loss. The cellular connections that provide that waterproof barrier are called desmosomal connections. The cells in the SGR are in a constant process of accumulating dense particles (keratohyalin containing lipids) as part of the skin manufacturing and maintenance (keratinization). Keratinization is the process a skin cell goes through as it gains more protein, flattens out and matures. This basic process is essential for having healthy skin.

Next is the Stratum Spinosum (SS) (prickle layer) which tops the Stratum Germinativum (SG) (basal layer) This SG layer is the place where cell manufacturing is continually going on to create more new skin cells. It takes two weeks for a new cell to make it through the layers of epidermis to the surface of your skin in a process called desquamation. As cells divide in the SG they accumulate more and more desmosomes (connections) on their outer surfaces looking very prickly as they push outward. (hence the name prickle layer). As you grow older this whole trip takes longer as the processing plant slows down.

The very important Melanocytes also live in this basal layer. The Malenocytes are the cells which produce Melanin, the dark pigment which blocks the sun's ultraviolet rays from the skin cells beneath. The darker your skin is, the more melanin you have in your epidermis.

All of these layers are going on at a microscopic level.

Think about this, then think about the complex "analogous theories" you are trying to do. They are rough generalizations. And when I mean your skin will go raw, you will destroy what your underlying DNA creates to protect itself. And that is important. It won't rebuild itself properly. You know skin cells shed every couple weeks right? That your skin replaces itself about every 30 days? Your underlying DNA will create normal cells regardless. The only way you could possibly continue having resilient cells is by continuing this process, which will leave your skin perpetually raw.

You know, there was one point where I wanted to destroy the "leprous legions" on my skin. It took me a long time to realize acne is just as much my skin as anything else. By trying to destroy acne you destroy your skin and it's natural processes. Instead of this, you need to recognize your skin isn't doing anything wrong. It's reacting to something else going on. Excess oil production of low sebum quality, excess proliferation of skin cells and inability to slough off within the pore, and also the inflammatory reactions that occur after a comedone appears, are usually caused by something systemically.

Acne is not indicative of incorrect phenotypic expression on the somatic level.Your skin isn't the problem. Something else is. Look at your diet, your stress level, your sleep patterns, and your hormonal history. Look at your history of topical use too. The ideas you present are far beyond either you and I can even begin to understand.

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this I apply to my face 21 times a day

Sarah, obviously this guy's not for real lol. And if he is, he's an ignorant idiot and you shouldn't waste your time trying to explain things to him.

Lance Boyle, props, most people will fall for this and think you're actually doing this. They'll probably even want to try it once you post that it works! People will do anything if someone else says it works, like splashing your own piss on your face.

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this I apply to my face 21 times a day

Sarah, obviously this guy's not for real lol. And if he is, he's an ignorant idiot and you shouldn't waste your time trying to explain things to him.

Lance Boyle, props, most people will fall for this and think you're actually doing this. They'll probably even want to try it once you post that it works! People will do anything if someone else says it works, like splashing your own piss on your face.

Yes, every 40 minutes for the time I am awake, or roughly 21 times a day, and perhaps I would have succeeded had it not been for the rubbing-alcohol induced intoxication and Sarah's detailed explanation.

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I guess we shall have to just deal without further revelations.

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