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themethod

New acne cure? Derma Advance

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U.S. Company Claims Cure for Acne

Greenwich Labs says its Derma Advance product strikes acne at its previously unknown source.

Greenwich, CT (PRWEB) June 27, 2011

Acne treatments typically focus on reducing the effects of acne. In contrast, Derma Advance focuses on stopping the root cause of acne, which Greenwich Labs has uniquely identified as increased sebum viscosity.

The president of Greenwich Labs, Nathan Allen, says that “most acne treatments focus on limiting the effects of a problem that already exists. We’re focused on the cause.â€

Over-the-counter acne treatments typically contain benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid, which act to kill acne bacteria on the face but can also needlessly dry out the skin. Greenwich Labs focuses in an entirely different area. “Generally, it’s assumed that the cause of acne is unknown, therefore a cure is unknown,†Allen explained. “We believe the cause of acne is not in the increase of sebum production but rather in a chemical change in the composition of sebum.â€

Sebum, or skin oil, is often assumed to have a fairly constant composition. But Allen believes that as the body increases lipid production at the onset of puberty, it also alters the composition of sebum. “The fat content of the skin’s oil increases,†Allen said, “which increases its viscosity, essentially making the oil thicker. That’s why your pores start to clog when you hit puberty.â€

Lipids are precursors to many hormones such as testosterone, which explains the increase in production at the onset of puberty. Pores clog with dead skin cells, which then provide an ideal environment for bacteria to grow. This results in common acne lesions.

Derma Advance is a patent-pending over-the-counter oral nutritional supplement that limits the liver’s ability to produce lipids and triglycerides, and hence decreases the thickness of the skin’s oil. According to Allen, “numerous clinical studies have proven that the formulation decreases lipid and triglyceride production, and we’re pioneers in linking that to decreased sebum viscosity.â€

The formulation has no known adverse side effects for those with a healthy liver, and the only known side effect is flushing in the face, neck and upper back. “The formulation has been taken over a million times,†Allen says, “and aside from facial flushing, it’s remarkably safe.â€

Crucial to Greenwich Labs’s analysis of the causes of acne is what’s referred to as the “circadian rhythm.†Greenwich Labs believes that the body’s primary fat production cycle is between 10pm and 4am, and thus the fat content of the skin’s oil peaks shortly thereafter. “Body functions do not operate at constant rates,†Allen said. “If you wish to target any given function, you’ll get the best results if you do so as peak operation.â€

Allen explains, “As you sleep at night, your liver is pumping out fats and dispersing them throughout your body.†As such, Greenwich Labs recommends that Derma Advance be taken between 4pm and 10pm, but “later is preferable,†Allen adds.

Regarding other acne treatments, Allen observes, “If they’re telling you to use the same stuff in the morning and evening, then they don’t know what they talking about. They’re ignoring a fundamental concept in acne prevention – your body’s circadian rhythm.â€

Greenwich Labs is even so bold as to post their research and patent information online (). “It’s not a big deal,†Allen says, “we want everyone to know what we’ve discovered and that this is really something quite revolutionary.†He also pointed out that the treatment has been filed with the U.S. Patent Office, so he’s not worried about competition.

Greenwich Labs is currently developing a system of creams to be used in conjunction with their oral tablet. But Allen asserted: “The creams help limit the results of acne -- the tablet, dare I be so bold? -- cures it.†Patents will be filed for the creams this summer.

Derma Advance is only sold through dermaadvance.com. Greenwich Labs expects the creams to reach the market by early 2012.

Web: dermaadvance.com

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Hm... interesting theory.

Their site doesn't actually name the active ingredient anywhere. One of the sections says something about statins, but I'm 90% sure the active ingredient is niacin (which causes flushing and has been known to decrease LDL and triglyceride levels). If that's the case, it's very overpriced and not really new, because previous studies have shown niacin decreases acne. I've been taking 500 mg of niacin every night (along with a stress-b supplement, which balances the niacin with some other b-vitamins, zinc, and copper), and it definitely helps, but I wouldn't call it a "cure" because it doesn't get rid of acne permanently. Hopefully I'm wrong, though, and there is more to this product.

Here is one old study; I'll try to find some others.

Edited by epicdermis

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Hm... interesting theory.

Their site doesn't actually name the active ingredient anywhere. One of the sections says something about statins, but I'm 90% sure the active ingredient is niacin (which causes flushing and has been known to decrease LDL and triglyceride levels). If that's the case, it's very overpriced and not really new, because previous studies have shown niacin decreases acne. I've been taking 500 mg of niacin every night (along with a stress-b supplement, which balances the niacin with some other b-vitamins, zinc, and copper), and it definitely helps, but I wouldn't call it a "cure" because it doesn't get rid of acne permanently. Hopefully I'm wrong, though, and there is more to this product.

I sent them an e-mail and was informed that this is not a definite cure, it only works while you take the tablet, so yes, maybe it is niacin.

Funny how they informed in their website that the product was tested by millions of people. It's probably niacin.

Edited by themethod

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^ you can get 500 mg niacin tablets for much cheaper than $20. My guess is that they combined niacin with statins or something so they could call it new and patent it...

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Would you pay $200 dollars for magic life-extending liquid only to find out it was tap water?

Edited by epicdermis

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if i knew before i bought the magic liquid that it was tap water, then of course i wouldnt pay. if someone speculated that hey maybe its just tap water, it has some simularities, then i would buy the magic liquid. you are only speculating that it is niacin (which it my be, but ill take my chances)

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So you don't even want to know what's in it before investing in it? Even if it isn't just niacin, niacin does exactly what they're describing, and assuming their sebum viscosity = acne assertion is correct, niacin should effectively "cure" acne.

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i already said it may be niacin, i dont really care what it is as long as it helps my acne. even if niacin is the active ingrediant they've formulated it to specifically fight acne. i think ill trust the experts

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Look, I finally found the ingredients on their site. It was under a tiny link that said "label" at the bottom.

Ingredients: 500 mg Niacin.

I'm holding in my hand a generic bottle of 100 Niacin tablets that I got for 7 dollars in a drug store. You are buying one for 22 dollars, and it comes with 69 less tablets.

7/100 = .07

22/31 = .71

You are spending over 10 times as much as I did FOR THE EXACT SAME PRODUCT. Also note that it says "patent pending", which means this isn't actually a "patented technology", and if they do manage to patent a drug as simple as an essential b-vitamin, all they've done is trick the patent office.

Go ahead and trust the "experts" who are willing to shamelessly take your money.

Edited by epicdermis

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One could say they are rather clever. They used their initiative, and picked up on something that appeared to work before others did. If this is true, my bet is that they patented it, before they even tested it properly. I do know what you saying about fooling the US Patent Office for essentially an simple B vitamin that's widely, but more importantly cheaply availble all over the world but they probably hinting that other ingredients coupled with this B vitamin 'cure' acne. Even still --> crafty buggers ;)

A bet there sitting then in the 'labs' loving life, laughing there heads off.

I know there was a big thing about Naicin (the flushing type) on this board under the Nutrition forum. Perhaps they got wind off this?...this is a popular acne knowledge base these days!

Regards,

P.S. It would have no affect on red marks and a certain build-up of dead skin cells would it?...Just active acne I guess looking at the mechanism (sebum viscoscity and that)

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Look, I finally found the ingredients on their site. It was under a tiny link that said "label" at the bottom.

Ingredients: 500 mg Niacin.

I'm holding in my hand a generic bottle of 100 Niacin tablets that I got for 7 dollars in a drug store. You are buying one for 22 dollars, and it comes with 69 less tablets.

7/100 = .07

22/31 = .71

You are spending over 10 times as much as I did FOR THE EXACT SAME PRODUCT. Also note that it says "patent pending", which means this isn't actually a "patented technology", and if they do manage to patent a drug as simple as an essential b-vitamin, all they've done is trick the patent office.

Go ahead and trust the "experts" who are willing to shamelessly take your money.

congradulations, it seems you have outsmarted the chemists and the patent office by doing a little bit of internet searching

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As with many people trying to sell yet another miracle cure, his 'science' sounds plausible. But IMHO they're just preying on the desperate. How can they possibly justify the ridiculous price for what is essentially a very common vitamin?

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their reply to my e-mail:

To your questions ...

Will I be able to see a 100% improvement in my condition?

Depends what you mean. You should see a significant improvement, but as with all treatments, people respond differently. Some see nearly all acne disappear, while others see a 30%-40% improvement. It really varies by person. That said, some who see a 30% improvement double their dosage (it's safe) and see further improvement. Everyone should start at 500mg per day (in part because it usually takes a few days to get used to it), but then you can increase the dosage if 500mg isn't having the effect you desire. Typically, though, you should give it two weeks before increasing the dosage.

May I still use skin products?

Yes. Just remember not to use products that clog pores and really dry out skin (which will cause your skin to produce more oil).

Does this product help with skin blemishes and scars? Is this niacin?

While some studies suggest it does help with blemishes, we haven't fully researched it, so we're unprepared to claim that (though we are researching a topical treatment that will do that -- probably coming out in the fall). It's a variation on niacin; most niacin formulations do nothing for decreasing the amount of fat in your skin's oil (which clogs your pores). We've identified the precise formulation that decreases the thickness of your skin's oil. What's amazing is that some promote any kind of niacin for this purpose, but studies show that only one formulation (and actually the less common one) actually affects your skin's oil.

Let us know if you have any other questions!

--The Derma Advance Team

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This made sense to me on a number of levels, so I looked into it. The type of niacin they make reference to is called "nicotinic acid", and while it's not the type commonly found as a B3-vitamin supplement, it is widely available as well. It may require a prescription in some countries.

The proposed mechanism (lipid imbalance induces acne) has been recognized before: http://www.drugspedia.org/pathologies/view/204

I propose we verify this claim. On this forum, we, as a target group, are the perfect subjects.

Prior to stuffing with nicotinic acid, let's check our LIPID PROFILE (or LIPID PANEL), fasting and non-fasting, and collect the results with some data visualization tool available online; I'll look into this. The "normal" levels (ex. for cholesterol) probably have little bearing on the matter (that is, the tests could be normal for the usual purpose they are performed, but still revealing to us).

Somewhere in that data there may be an answer for us all. Let's do this.

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The company's answer to themethod's question just makes it more clear that they're willing to say anything to get your money...

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I'm no expert, but I did look this up. And it does look to be bogus. But the indgredients also include (hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, vegatable stearic acid, silicon dioxide, vegtable magnesium stearate and pharmaceutical glaze, along with the 500mg of Niacin. Just another overpriced pill.

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I'm no expert, but I did look this up. And it does look to be bogus. But the indgredients also include (hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, vegatable stearic acid, silicon dioxide, vegtable magnesium stearate and pharmaceutical glaze, along with the 500mg of Niacin. Just another overpriced pill.

The niacin part is apparently nicotinic acid, not niacinamide. Turns out it's rather hard to find as an active, at least in my country. I will get that lipid panel done when I'll find the time. The science, for what it's worth, makes sense to me. I do have problems with liver function, and there is a strong correlation in my immediate family between acne and liver function issues.

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Under niacin research it says it stops the oxidation of adipose tissue, doesn't that mean it stops body fat burninig porcess?

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The niacin part is apparently nicotinic acid, not niacinamide. Turns out it's rather hard to find as an active, at least in my country

Where did you get this information?

I don't know what country you are in, but puritan.com carries multiple forms of niacin, including nicotinic acid, and it's very inexpensive.

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I would like to know if you have ever tried this product (nicotinic acid, derma advanced) and if it really works, because for me that is the important thing not if its expensive or not.

Do you know about adverse effects? couperosis? rosacea?

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