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hina79

Is bacteria responsible for excess oil?

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I have noticed whenever I use any anti-bacterial my skin becomes noticeably lot less oily. If I try an oral as well as topical antibiotic, it actually becomes dry. For one year I was using only oral antibiotic erythromycin and no topicals, and my skin was lot less oily.

So now I am thinking somehow the skin is producing more oil due to the metabolic activities of the bacteria? I know we have bacteria all over our body, but the whole body doesn't get oily. That is because only the sebum rich parts like the face are actually able to produce more oil due to the metabolic activities of bacteria.

I know some people with oily skin have no acne but maybe b/c their sebum is thinner and maybe their skin is thinner so sebum can easily reach surface instead of getting clogged?

Does your skin also get less oily with use of anti-bacterials?

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I find that I can shampoo daily and have no oiliness. But if I wash my back, chest, or face with products, oily. Even just body wash makes me more oily.

For some people, using topical washes that are designed to be anti-bacterial help with the oil because the person just has excessive oily skin that is not caused by dehydration, meaning that it benefits from such strong washes. If I used that, I'd be an oil slick within 30 minutes.

I only shower once a day though, so only wash my face once a day, and it's significantly less oily than when I washed twice a day.

You're saying that washing the oil off your skin makes you oily?? How do you explain such a phenomenon? Isn't that just like saying that the more you wash your car or your house, the dirtier they get? :) I think you're just imagining things...

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I find that I can shampoo daily and have no oiliness. But if I wash my back, chest, or face with products, oily. Even just body wash makes me more oily.

For some people, using topical washes that are designed to be anti-bacterial help with the oil because the person just has excessive oily skin that is not caused by dehydration, meaning that it benefits from such strong washes. If I used that, I'd be an oil slick within 30 minutes.

I only shower once a day though, so only wash my face once a day, and it's significantly less oily than when I washed twice a day.

You're saying that washing the oil off your skin makes you oily?? How do you explain such a phenomenon? Isn't that just like saying that the more you wash your car or your house, the dirtier they get? :) I think you're just imagining things...

The myth continues word for word :dance:

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You're saying that washing the oil off your skin makes you oily?? How do you explain such a phenomenon? Isn't that just like saying that the more you wash your car or your house, the dirtier they get? :) I think you're just imagining things...

The myth continues word for word :dance:

If Ashley wants to proveto me the accuracy of her claim, I'll be glad to help her out by suggesting some experiments she can do with Sebutape Skin Indicators; if she follows my instructions carefully, then scans the Skin Indicators afterwards and posts them for all of us to see, I'll believe her. But not until then! ;)

Let's see how serious she is at provingher really odd claim...

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I love Bryan. From the days of yore when I first became interested in dermatology and hair loss he has always been there correcting people in an endearly pompous manner, presumably, all for the sake of science and secondary gain.

According to the current model you have the pathogenesis backward. P. acnes utilizes lipases to break down sebum which the bacteria can utilize as a substrate for energy production. A by-product of the biochemical reaction is the production of free fatty acids. These products serve as irritants which induce an inflammatory reaction. The proliferation of the bacteria is likely the result of increased sebum production not the other way around. ;)

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I think for me personally, the acne is caused by yeast, not bacteria.

Topicals for bacteria do absolutely nothing for me but make it look worse, dry and scabby. Oral antibiotics of different types for 18 months made it much worse too and I think ultimately it made my acne much more stubborn.

Now it's a folliculitis type thing which is deeply imbedded in my cheeks and the only thing that makes it die down is going without carbs. Of course this makes one feel rather crappy, but I'm about to re-start this regime as it's the only thing that's ever worked for me.

Edited by En Be

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