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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them?

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

Well, it's not really clear and there's not too much information about the matter, but over time our bodies can get used to having certain foods and not having others.

For example, I used to be a vegetarian. As soon as I started eating meat again, I had a little bit of digestive issues for a few days afterwards, probably because my body wasn't used to digesting meat for years. But it went away within under a week.

Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually.

So yeah, it's a bit complicated. :P

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

If we are naturally sensitive to a food and we stop eating it, our body can de-sensitize itself. I believe it takes 6 months to become desensitized to a food.

However, if there is some genetic (or other reason) that we will remain sensitive to this food no matter how long we avoid it, our body will react EVEN WORSE when we eat it again. If a person is gluten intolerant and they stop eating gluten for six months, their reaction to gluten the next time they eat it will be much more severe. Sometimes even vomiting or severe stomach cramps.

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

Well, it's not really clear and there's not too much information about the matter, but over time our bodies can get used to having certain foods and not having others.

For example, I used to be a vegetarian. As soon as I started eating meat again, I had a little bit of digestive issues for a few days afterwards, probably because my body wasn't used to digesting meat for years. But it went away within under a week.

Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually.

So yeah, it's a bit complicated. :P

Citation please?

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

Well, it's not really clear and there's not too much information about the matter, but over time our bodies can get used to having certain foods and not having others.

For example, I used to be a vegetarian. As soon as I started eating meat again, I had a little bit of digestive issues for a few days afterwards, probably because my body wasn't used to digesting meat for years. But it went away within under a week.

Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually.

So yeah, it's a bit complicated. :P

Citation please?

Lol, this is one of those many awesome dietary questions where the best answer from science is a big fat :shrug: .

We just don't even begin to understand this stuff yet. Sensitization is a known immunological phenomenon, but so is induced tolerance - see the hygiene theory of autoimmune diseases for more info on that craziness.

You can say it "depends", but you can't really clearly say "what" it depends on. For example, you can you say it depends on the physiological basis behind the sensitivity/intolerance. The body can upregulate animal protein digesting enzymes, for example, if animal protein is suddenly introduced. But then sometimes, the ability to express those enzymes is lost over time - as in severe lactose intolerance. So the fact that the intolerance is due to changes in enzymatic expression doesn't necessarily tell you much about what effect long term withdrawal of the stimulus will have.

When talking about immediate allergic reactions (hypersensitivity type I), we know that pre-sensitized state is necessary for a reaction to occur. Maybe. It gets complicated because pre-sensitization can be provided by substances other than the allergen in question, if they act as mimics with respect to the human immune system. Sometimes these "mimics" have an obviously similar chemical structure and are found in a similar environment. Sometimes they have similar chemical structures, but are found in totally off-the-wall different environments. Sometimes, they're totally different types of molecules that have no obvious chemical relationship to the true allergen. Sometimes, they can pre-sensitize the immune system, but can't actually cause an allergic reaction - but the allergen it mimics CAN.

And then sometimes, if you present the immune system with tiny, incrementally increasing doses of a problematic allergen, you can actually force induced tolerance/adaptation - such that the encountering the allergen in nature is no longer an issue. Ask my brother, who can play with my dog with impunity - when a year ago he would have been hardly able to breath within hours of coming into the house. Or you have the opposite, where each additive exposure to an allergen potentiates and worsens the reaction to the next exposure. Or, you know, somewhere in between.

And have you ever noticed that even immediate allergic reactions can be completely and utterly unpredictable from person to person? There's rarely a good way to predict the severity of an allergy in a particular person without presenting the allergen and seeing what happens. One person gets a swollen lip from peanuts, another dies? What the hell?

And that's just the first of the 4, maybe 5 types of hypersensitivity reactions. The first one is the one we know the MOST about.

The point being, we just don't know. So don't worry too much about it.

Edited by greentiger87

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

Well, it's not really clear and there's not too much information about the matter, but over time our bodies can get used to having certain foods and not having others.

For example, I used to be a vegetarian. As soon as I started eating meat again, I had a little bit of digestive issues for a few days afterwards, probably because my body wasn't used to digesting meat for years. But it went away within under a week.

Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually.

So yeah, it's a bit complicated. :P

Citation please?

Lol, this is one of those many awesome dietary questions where the best answer from science is a big fat :shrug: .

We just don't even begin to understand this stuff yet. Sensitization is a known immunological phenomenon, but so is induced tolerance - see the hygiene theory of autoimmune diseases for more info on that craziness.

You can say it "depends", but you can't really clearly say "what" it depends on. For example, you can you say it depends on the physiological basis behind the sensitivity/intolerance. The body can upregulate animal protein digesting enzymes, for example, if animal protein is suddenly introduced. But then sometimes, the ability to express those enzymes is lost over time - as in severe lactose intolerance. So the fact that the intolerance is due to changes in enzymatic expression doesn't necessarily tell you much about what effect long term withdrawal of the stimulus will have.

When talking about immediate allergic reactions (hypersensitivity type I), we know that pre-sensitized state is necessary for a reaction to occur. Maybe. It gets complicated because pre-sensitization can be provided by substances other than the allergen in question, if they act as mimics with respect to the human immune system. Sometimes these "mimics" have an obviously similar chemical structure and are found in a similar environment. Sometimes they have similar chemical structures, but are found in totally off-the-wall different environments. Sometimes, they're totally different types of molecules that have no obvious chemical relationship to the true allergen. Sometimes, they can pre-sensitize the immune system, but can't actually cause an allergic reaction - but the allergen it mimics CAN.

And then sometimes, if you present the immune system with tiny, incrementally increasing doses of a problematic allergen, you can actually force induced tolerance/adaptation - such that the encountering the allergen in nature is no longer an issue. Ask my brother, who can play with my dog with impunity - when a year ago he would have been hardly able to breath within hours of coming into the house. Or you have the opposite, where each additive exposure to an allergen potentiates and worsens the reaction to the next exposure. Or, you know, somewhere in between.

And have you ever noticed that even immediate allergic reactions can be completely and utterly unpredictable from person to person? There's rarely a good way to predict the severity of an allergy in a particular person without presenting the allergen and seeing what happens. One person gets a swollen lip from peanuts, another dies? What the hell?

And that's just the first of the 4, maybe 5 types of hypersensitivity reactions. The first one is the one we know the MOST about.

The point being, we just don't know. So don't worry too much about it.

I was asking for a citation for the statement highlighted in bold. This is why it was in bold.

"Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually"

I want a citation for this and this alone. I'm afraid you wasted paragraphs.

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Ease up gMARIAs... he wasn't even the one who made the original statement!

Greentiger, I really like your approach to health & nutrition and enjoy reading your posts. You clearly know your shit.

And then sometimes, if you present the immune system with tiny, incrementally increasing doses of a problematic allergen, you can actually force induced tolerance/adaptation - such that the encountering the allergen in nature is no longer an issue.

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QUOTE (greentiger87 @ Jan 20 2011, 07:31 PM)

QUOTE (gMARIAs @ Jan 20 2011, 07:59 PM)

QUOTE (chunkylard @ Jan 20 2011, 08:57 AM)

QUOTE (esessa @ Jan 20 2011, 08:53 AM)

Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

Well, it's not really clear and there's not too much information about the matter, but over time our bodies can get used to having certain foods and not having others.

For example, I used to be a vegetarian. As soon as I started eating meat again, I had a little bit of digestive issues for a few days afterwards, probably because my body wasn't used to digesting meat for years. But it went away within under a week.

Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually.

So yeah, it's a bit complicated. tongue.gif

Citation please?

Lol, this is one of those many awesome dietary questions where the best answer from science is a big fat shrug.gif .

We just don't even begin to understand this stuff yet. Sensitization is a known immunological phenomenon, but so is induced tolerance - see the hygiene theory of autoimmune diseases for more info on that craziness.

You can say it "depends", but you can't really clearly say "what" it depends on. For example, you can you say it depends on the physiological basis behind the sensitivity/intolerance. The body can upregulate animal protein digesting enzymes, for example, if animal protein is suddenly introduced. But then sometimes, the ability to express those enzymes is lost over time - as in severe lactose intolerance. So the fact that the intolerance is due to changes in enzymatic expression doesn't necessarily tell you much about what effect long term withdrawal of the stimulus will have.

When talking about immediate allergic reactions (hypersensitivity type I), we know that pre-sensitized state is necessary for a reaction to occur. Maybe. It gets complicated because pre-sensitization can be provided by substances other than the allergen in question, if they act as mimics with respect to the human immune system. Sometimes these "mimics" have an obviously similar chemical structure and are found in a similar environment. Sometimes they have similar chemical structures, but are found in totally off-the-wall different environments. Sometimes, they're totally different types of molecules that have no obvious chemical relationship to the true allergen. Sometimes, they can pre-sensitize the immune system, but can't actually cause an allergic reaction - but the allergen it mimics CAN.

And then sometimes, if you present the immune system with tiny, incrementally increasing doses of a problematic allergen, you can actually force induced tolerance/adaptation - such that the encountering the allergen in nature is no longer an issue. Ask my brother, who can play with my dog with impunity - when a year ago he would have been hardly able to breath within hours of coming into the house. Or you have the opposite, where each additive exposure to an allergen potentiates and worsens the reaction to the next exposure. Or, you know, somewhere in between.

And have you ever noticed that even immediate allergic reactions can be completely and utterly unpredictable from person to person? There's rarely a good way to predict the severity of an allergy in a particular person without presenting the allergen and seeing what happens. One person gets a swollen lip from peanuts, another dies? What the hell?

And that's just the first of the 4, maybe 5 types of hypersensitivity reactions. The first one is the one we know the MOST about.

The point being, we just don't know. So don't worry too much about it.

I was asking for a citation for the statement highlighted in bold. This is why it was in bold.

"Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually"

I want a citation for this and this alone. I'm afraid you wasted paragraphs.

Old thread but i find it interesting as well. ""Also if you eat carbs, your glucose/insulin can actually become more sensitive to it over time. If you avoid them, the opposite happens actually"

I have been avoiding carbs pretty heavily in the past few moinths... but i plan on reintroducing them back.

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Do we make ourselves more sensitive to foods by avoiding them? Like if we're somewhat sensitive/intolerant of a food, does the longer we avoid that type of food/ingredient make us even more sensitive to it?

If you have a gut flora problem, e.g. your gut does not have a good variety of strains of good bacteria, then in the case of fermented foods, you can lose that good bacteria altogether. For example, if you lack the necessary bacteria to digest dairy, then by not eating dairy you may lose those three strains of probiotics altogether. Try dairy again a year later and you'll get horrible indigestion.

I tried Dr. Ayers recommendations with natural fermented greek yogurt that has live cultures (from grassfed cows not treated with rgBT hormones) and noticed that I can now tolerate that form of dairy without the HORRIBLE indigestion I used to get. You can read more of his science at coolinginflammation.blogspot.com

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However, if there is some genetic (or other reason) that we will remain sensitive to this food no matter how long we avoid it, our body will react EVEN WORSE when we eat it again. If a person is gluten intolerant and they stop eating gluten for six months, their reaction to gluten the next time they eat it will be much more severe. Sometimes even vomiting or severe stomach cramps.

Yes, this is exactly what happened to me. It has happened with most foods I have given up. Although there are certain foods, like potatoes, which I can stomach ONLY if I have done a lot of healing to my gut and then only eat them once in a great while. There was a time where I was thinking I would be able to add a bunch more foods back into my diet, but then I screwed up bad. I realized I could tolerate eating black beans again, and instead of keeping them as a once in awhile treat, I began eating them every day, completely destroyed my gut and now I'm back to barely being able to eat anything. :(

Next time I won't make that mistake.

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