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Dan B

My theory and acne

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So I recently came across the importance of zinc and acne. However, why are some people able to absorb more zinc than others? I believe it's determined by the ph level within our bodies...If our bodies are too acidic then minerals are borrowed in order to remove the acids therefore depleting zinc levels. http://www.simplygf.com/body-ph-as-indicators-of-health/. Foods that are acidic include cheese, ice cream, other dairy products, coffee, and chocolate. These are items that are popular for causing acne. Most all fruits and vegetables are alkanine. Lemon water is also alkanine.

So, I'm wondering if anyone is interested in starting a study of really increasing your ph level by eating alkanine foods. Tooth Fairy has a topic for making green smoohies with fresh vegetables and fruits, which would be a great start. Plus I would like the person to take 50 mg of zinc daily.

Edited by Dan B

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I dont know whether im any use to you, but im on 15 mg of zinc and have been on for 2 weeks. I have also stopped drinking milk 3 weeks ago along with yoghurt and cheese and i can already feel a difference with my skin.

I have also recently started using around the same time however:

Benzoyl peroxide

Vitamin E suppliment

Vitamin E oil

Note: Vitamin E makes body alkaline

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Seems to me that it can't be quite this simple. I agree that zinc is a key player, but if it is as you say and zinc is "used up" in an acidic environment, it seems like a supplement would be more than enough. Just take enough zinc and the acidic environment should be remedied. I am, of course, assuming that the zinc would be absorbed.

But regardless, alkalinizing foods may be a good idea. I personally would not like to take up the gauntlet, as this would restrict my diet to a ridiculous degree. But keep truckin'. Zinc is definitely worth some thought.

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"The importance for maintaining an optimal venous blood pH cannot be over emphasized. Any deviation from optimal venous blood pH of 7.46 can result in lack of utilization of enzymes, lack of absorption of trace nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids."

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Aha, so you're saying that the zinc (among other things) simply won't be absorbed with a non-optimal blood pH. Seems possible.

According to the chart in your link, eating more "raw" foods seems to be a good start.

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Groan. The pH of the blood is one of the most meticulously regulated homeostatic values. Nothing you eat is going to change the pH of anything except for your urine. The carbonic acid - bicarbonate buffer, which uses your breathing to regulate CO2 dissolved in the blood, keeps the pH of the blood in an incredibly narrow range. This is a long-known and well-accepted medical fact. If the pH of the blood were to move outside of that range for any extended period of time, you'd descend into possible seizures, loss of consciousness, and coma. I.e., metabolic acidosis in diabetics, or alkalosis caused by hyperventilation.

The acidity of any food you eat is incredibly overpowered by stomach acid. Even antacids are only able to increase the pH of your stomach for minutes, and stimulate acid secretion to make up for it. Your intestines on the other hand, are neutralized by pancreatic juices - and are always alkaline. Urine is the only place where the "ash" of a food item can change the pH.

It is true that large amounts of protein may contribute to osteoporosis, because calcium may be leached to counter their conversion into organic acids. But this model is very controversial right now, because of mixed results of research studies. The closest thing to a consensus right now, is that a high protein, high calcium diet is great for bones and reduces osteoporosis. A high protein, low calcium diet will increase osteoporosis.

Regardless, zinc never enters the equation, and the pH of the blood never changes.

If you really want to maximize your absorption of zinc, look into interactions with other minerals (copper, iron, etc), interactions with Vitamin C by the proxy of iron absorption, inhibition by tannins and phytates, promotion by some proteins..

Regardless, if you're taking a supplement - you're very, very likely maxing out all of these interactions and forcing absorption simply because your taking in so much zinc.

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Show me a peer reviewed study that reports alkalinizing foods "reduce lactic acid buildup" during exercise. Even claiming that betrays a lack of understanding of the process in which "lactic acid" is produced. (I'm honestly not trying to be condescending, just brutally honest).

It's the anionic form of lactic acid, lactate, that is released into the blood stream, with a stray proton from ATP hydrolysis. And even that is only when intracellular enzymatic buffer systems are overwhelmed, which is not a normal situation. The "lactic acid buildup" that causes the burning, acute pain in muscles is always transient, and lasts only as long as it takes the lactate be washed into the blood. The liver and kidneys metabolize the lactate so that no net proton (H+) is left over . The combination of respiratory compensation (the carbonic acid - bicarbonate buffer) and metabolism of the lactate/H+ pair result in a no net proton burden, and thus no net change in blood pH.

If the blood pH were actually allowed to change significantly, you'd be in lactic acidosis, a serious disease state with severe implications. For you to release enough lactic acid from muscular work that you overwhelm the buffer systems and enter acidosis, you'd have to be doing something completely outside of the norm, like seizing continuously for hours. If the blood pH goes above 7.45, or below 7.35, you're in serious trouble. Thats how narrow the range is. What you're essentially saying is that something in the green smoothies is raising the pH of the blood, and therefore blunting the effects of lactic acid acid release. Do you see why thats just not possible?

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness isn't caused by lactic acid buildup. Not sure if you were implying that or not. Tbh, no one's quite sure what causes it. The prevailing theory is microtears in the muscles, but the evidence is scant and contradictory for even that. In fact, there's really no treatment that seems to actually reduce the pain of DOMS reliably and convincingly other than NSAIDS, like ibuprofen. Several treatments are thought to "take the edge off" or "provide general comfort" - massage, hot tub soaks.

The alkalinizing foods are mostly fruits and vegetables, so yeah, its very healthy for innumerable reasons. None of which is alkalinization. I don't doubt that green smoothies are very healthy (I drink them about twice a week myself). They may even be able to stimulate the activity of the liver. That doesn't change very fundamental physiology of body and blood pH. And it doesn't mean you should follow those ridiculous Alkaline/Acid charts.

As for the Roseburg study, show me where it was published in a peer reviewed journal. If you can't,

then it is - as it seems to be - an unscientific, nearly anecdotal study produced by those with a unfortunately strong interest in the results confirming their beliefs. If your assessment is true.. they're actually saying the green smoothies further acidify the stomach (not alkalinize it).

Edited by greentiger87

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If this is the reason for acne - why are homosapiens (and edit domesticated cats) the only creatures to get it - surely such a flaw would occur in animals to. :P

Edited by Claudio

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