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Dotty1

My body doesn't convert Beta Carotene to Vitamin A very efficiently. Any tips?

So, I figured out that my acne is caused by hypothyroidism (I always felt chilly, had cold hands and feet).

I just read that people with hypothyroidism do not convert Beta Carotene to Vitamin A efficiently.

Anything with Beta Carotene in it turns me a beautiful bright orange. I look like a carrot.

I would love to start eating sweet potatoes, but I know I'll turn orange. :(

Does anyone know what might help my body convert the Beta Carotene to Vitamin A?? Any vitamin or mineral I might be lacking?? Any advice?

Edited by Dotty1

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The new disorder you diagnose yourself with next week will save you from hypothyroidism.

people who have one disorder obviously mischose the board... :rolleyes: it just so happens, that when something gets screwd in your body it affects various different parts and processes and demonstrates itself by a combination of symptoms, 'cus it's usually caused by combination of factors. everything is connected- that's the very essence of holistic approach. if you don't get it- i still insist on withholding from manifesting ignorance and disregard. :doubt:

Dotty, if you suffer from multiple issues that seem to have their background in poor liver functioning (food allergies that may be connected to not efficient enough detoxification processes, hence particular sensitivity to some foods a'ka some types of toxins) liver is also responsible to processing beta carotene to retinoids, multiple forms of vitamin A, you may want to run liver function tests...

the good news is that if the liver is the case, the vitamin A metabolism disorder may be the direct acne cause and once it's solved, your problem should be gone :)

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You're new here, but Dotty has had about 32 different conditions and "cured" his/her/its acne about 32 different times with different crackpot schemes. As was alluded to, in about 2 weeks, he/she/it will completely forget about this supposed hypothyroidism, and self-diagnose him/her/it-self with Legionnaires Disease and "cure" it with onions or cilantro.

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ok... if so, i'm sorry... maybe i've been too harsh in my judgement. i've only known dotty for posting very helpful food list, and having myself really spread face and body acne for eleven, soon to be twelve years (since the age of nine), that turned out to be resistant to any kinds of uptaken treatment, being recently diagnosed with hashimoto, which is an auto-immune thyroid disease, and coping with various disorders concerning digestive trackts, and repetitious cases of different yeast infections- i'm really pretty sensitive, when somebody whose health is just hard-to-believe-faulty is automatically considered hypochondric simply because it's hard-to-believe... but if it was not the automatical judgement in this case, then sorry.

and really i'm so tired of taking all those different treatments for different conditions, which seem to induce another conditions in me, only when solving the concerned one, and all these only because most doctors don't seem to have basic knowledge outside their specialisation...

i need house md to take of my case :D but i i also believe that finally combining a well balanced, paleo diet and tracing any food sensitivities if they're involved, will do just as fine ;)

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I just read that people with hypothyroidism do not convert Beta Carotene to Vitamin A efficiently.

I've never heard that about hypothyroidism, but I've heard several times that people with diabeteshave trouble converting beta carotene to vitamin A.

Anything with Beta Carotene in it turns me a beautiful bright orange. I look like a carrot.

I would love to start eating sweet potatoes, but I know I'll turn orange. :(

Don't capitalize "beta carotene". Like "ascorbic acid" and "pantothenic acid", it's not a proper noun, just something to be written in lower-case letters.

Anyway...do you really expect to turn orange, just from eating reasonableamounts of sweet potatoes? :)

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I just read that people with hypothyroidism do not convert Beta Carotene to Vitamin A efficiently.

I've never heard that about hypothyroidism, but I've heard several times that people with diabeteshave trouble converting beta carotene to vitamin A.

Anything with Beta Carotene in it turns me a beautiful bright orange. I look like a carrot.

I would love to start eating sweet potatoes, but I know I'll turn orange. :(

Don't capitalize "beta carotene". Like "ascorbic acid" and "pantothenic acid", it's not a proper noun, just something to be written in lower-case letters.

Anyway...do you really expect to turn orange, just from eating reasonableamounts of sweet potatoes? :)

Uncle Buck and Ariventa do not know my body, my 14 years of health problems or the inordinately difficult task it has been to find the root of my acne.

Yeah, I've had plenty of health problems but both of you are mistaken that my health problems mysteriously "go away" as quickly as I think of new ones. The truth is, NONE of them go away -- THEY JUST GET WORSE!!! AND MORE OF THEM!!!

The inability to digest protein. The low stomach acid. The declining ability to digest most normal foods now (like onions, avocados, tomatoes, citrus and garlic?!) --all causing huge cysts-- and many other health issues. I posted about every product I tried, every result I had and basically did EVERYTHING to stop the cysts. Most of this mess would have been finished five years ago if doctors hadn't given me false negatives on tests. Anyway, 14 years later, we know its an auto-immune disease (severe Celiac) and an MD says its also a severe case of hypothyroidism. :confused: I realize some members here are upset by the fact that I've searched every nook and cranny to find the cause of my acne. :doubt: I'd probably be fed up with myself too. LOL.

It has been such a long, long road.

-----------------------

I've never heard that about hypothyroidism, but I've heard several times that people with diabetes have trouble converting beta carotene to vitamin A.

I read it here:

"Patients with hypothyroidism, as well as some diabetics, are unable to convert beta carotene to vitamin A.(1)"

Source: http://www.vitasentials.com/a-25.htm

"while in hypothyroidism, beta carotene conversion to A is markedly decreased, resulting sometimes in a yellowish tint to the skin of a hypo who is consuming beta carotene rich foods."

Source: http://www.ithyroid.com/vitamin_a.htm

"Persons with hypothyroidism do not convert beta-carotene easily. "

Source: http://www.krispin.com/thyroid.html

I turn orange very easily when I eat any beta carotene rich food. Friends thought I had jaundice. :rolleyes: (Sweet potato: 38,000 IU of vitamin A in the form of beta carotene) :confused:

Edited by Dotty1

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if you've been only recently diagnosed with celiac disease it's no suprise really you have some issues with digestive trackt. for how long exactly have you already been off gluten?

your bowel must have suffered some serious damage and it needs time to regenerate... and you know you have to exclude gluten from your diet completely to stop producing antibodies that eat up your intestines? any traceable amounts are unacceptable. and with injured bowel it's normal that you're hypersensitive to cabbage and onion family plants. this should end once your bowel is restored.

also gluten sensitivity might induce autoimmune response in other organs, also in thyroid (have you been tested for hashimoto? antibodies levels?). Start from having your liver evaluated and cutting off gluten, at first avoid anything that doesn't claim that is gluten free, or is a plant/egg that you may wash profusely with water and get out of shell/ peel. Meat can also be marinated or conserved with seasoning containing gluten, so be careful.

And have your antibodies tested regularly, it will tell if you are doing everything well- then they should be constantly dropping, or if you still keep receiving it unconciously from some unsuspected source.

Good luck! And I know how hard it's but do one thing at a time, first take care of these things, they're highiest priority, only then, if having them already healed doesn't earn you clear face, start looking for other causes. You are simple unable to clear out all the possible causes at once, so stop attempting at it. It will only stress you more to set yourself an impossible aim.

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I realize some members here are upset by the fact that I've searched every nook and cranny to find the cause of my acne. :doubt: I'd probably be fed up with myself too. LOL.

What gets me is how you usually seem to be struggling to find things that've already been discussed here for years.

And I never get the feeling you've ever clicked on a single link I've provided. Links that take you to very good threads full of research about almost every health issue that impact acne.

And if an MD now says you have a severe case of hypothyroidism, have you not been prescribed thyroid hormone?

Other than that, not much is going to get better until you improve your digestion issues. Focus on that. Have you read the pinned leaky gut thread? The ZAG enzyme/Lectin thread? Do you keep a natural circadian cycle with plenty of bright outdoor light in the daytime, sleep will in darkness at night while consuming the nutrients needed to make melatonin/seratonin? What about stress as cortisol affects the digestive system?

What about just generally leading a healthy lifestyle with natural circadian cycle, stress management, physical activity and a nutrient dense, anti-inflammatory blood sugar stabilizing diet that doesn't include anything you have an intolerance for? Good for whatever ails you.

Edited by alternativista

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Annayake - I've been off gluten now about 8 months. I only discovered I was hypothyroid about 3 weeks ago. I read hypothyroidism can cause leaky gut/weak stomach acid too.

Alternavista - I have been clicking on your links. But I guess the hypothyroidism got worse a few years ago because I began sleeping a LOT and when I was awake, my mind was hazy and acting like I hadn't slept enough. Plenty of tests revealed nothing I guess because doctors sent me home.

Oddly, it turned out to be goitrogenic foods causing me to sleep a lot. Goitrogenic foods are soy, corn, canola oil, soybean oil, gluten, mustard, cruciferous vegetables like kale, collard greens, bok choy, cabbage, rutabega, brussel sprouts, spinach, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, peaches, strawberries and millet.

So, I was reading your posts but it is very hard to retain or learn anything new with a sleepy brain.

During this time, I've met a quite a few doctors who were "questionable." They would only see me for about 10 minutes total and I felt like I was just one in a thousand patients they were seeing that day. After ten minutes of looking over symptoms and seeing no direct corelation with any easy-to-diagnose illness they just wanted to move on to the next client. So they always referred me to a psychiatrist. Okay, not always, but the ones who saw me for 5 minutes did. The good doctors gave me referrals to other physicians. Thank gosh I found out it was Celiac Disease. :P

Doctors have been so unhelpful.

Yes, I have spoken with an excellent MD friend online in another state but from what I understand I need to see an MD in person to get medication (I have an appointment 8 weeks from now). [...]I've read that many hypothyroid medications cause a host of side effects (hair loss, for example) and I'd prefer to go the natural route.

Edited by Dotty1

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And if an MD now says you have a severe case of hypothyroidism, have you not been prescribed thyroid hormone?

Rather a good point, but then 'tis replied:

Yes, I have spoken with an excellent MD friend online in another state but from what I understand I need to see an MD in person to get medication (I have an appointment 8 weeks from now). [...]I've read that many hypothyroid medications cause a host of side effects (hair loss, for example) and I'd prefer to go the natural route.

Does that sound rational when you read it back? Wouldn't you rather try to achieve some base level of functioning in your life and then find a "natural" alternative for something that's proved to work?

Who knows what's really going on, but from what you post, it sure seems like you are irrationally running from one self-diagnosis to another, inventing your own treatments, and then forming random correlations due to the normal fluctuations in your symptoms.

One of the important ways real doctors diagnose is by treating. If you take medication for your (diagnosed by a doctor who's not examined you???) hypothyroidism and suddenly some symptoms get dramatically better, then you've learned something. Go off the meds if you want, self-diagnose with something else if you want, but at least then you learned that it looked like hypothyroidism to a real doctor and responded to medication designed to treat hypothyroidism.

If my brain was being impaired to the degree you describe, I believe I would stay in the doctor's office and take the nastiest, most side-effect-laden chemicals s/he prescribed until I at least got enough relief to be able to think clearly about what to do next. You're worrying about side-effects you've never actually experienced while suffering from much worse symptoms. How does that make sense?

So they always referred me to a psychiatrist.

You're posting in a holistic forum, and yet you seem to discount that your brain is connected to your body. Here we are in the 21st century and I guess people still assume that being referred to a psychiatrist means the referrer thinks their symptoms aren't "real". Your brain is most intimately connected to your body, and they can mess each other up. A skilled psychiatrist might be able to help you get to the point where you could have a more normal brain function. Even if that didn't clear all your other symptoms (I bet it would clear some of them!), at least you could think more clearly about what to do.

Tackling your array of serious symptoms with an impaired brain is like being a one-legged man in an ass-kicking contest. It's sad to even watch.

Doctors have been SO unhelpful

That sure happens, unfortunately. But it's a two-way street. Did you faithfully try what doctors suggested and give them accurate feedback on what happened? Do you give their advice a reasonable chance to help or at least learn something from them? Did you ever try even one psychiatrist to see if you could improve your brain symptoms? Good grief, you're describing your symptoms as like having Alzheimer's and yet looking askance at being referred to a psychiatrist.

Which all sounds unsympathetic, but it's not meant to be. It just seems like the vicious cycle you're in now is going to take you nowhere, acne is the least of your problems, and you really need serious help you're not getting. If you haven't tried at least a couple of different psychiatrists (like all professionals, they vary in their skill levels quite a bit), you should really consider it.

Good luck; I hope something changes for the better for you and next year is better for you than this one.

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Databased - I definitely do have a doctor's appointment to try to get to the bottom of this. I welcome anything the medical industry can do for me and I certainly would take medication if it meant everyone could get to the bottom of this. However, I meant that I did not want to be left on medication for 20 years. If my typing was not clear, I'm sorry. :confused:

Well, the reasons the doctors suggested I see a psychiatrist did not seem reasonable. For example, the doctors who referred me to psychiatrists only talked to me for 10 minutes at most. Mostly 5 minutes. Sit down and talk to someone 5 minutes and time it. It is incredibly short. If I wasn't an easy-to-diagnose case of HIV, cancer, broken leg, diabetes or another common problem, they really didn't want to handle my case. None of them wanted to sit down for an hour and start trying to make sense of the symptoms. They would say after 5 minutes, "Okay, tests are negative. I really don't believe your symptoms. I think it is in your mind." The Internal Medicine Specialist who talked with me for 10 minutes (who worked with Celiac Disease) told me, "Maybe you are having negative dreams? Maybe you don't remember these negative dreams and you've created this world you live in. You need to see a psychiatrist." (WTF?!?!)

I also heard about the insurance problems with psychiatrists. One friend told me that when they saw a psychiatrist for one visit to say she was feeling slightly depressed, her health insurance was raised by 60% for 10 years because she was then considered a higher risk :eh:.

The endocrynologist (who deals with thyroid disorders) saw me twice for 10 minutes, gave me one thyroid test (I've since learned she should have given me a T3 and T4 test too). She then moved to a new city without notifying me and did not give me a referral to a new endocrynologist. With so little energy, set backs like these can be overwhelming.

20 minutes was the maximum amount of time I ever saw a doctor, and that was a "great" geneticist at a famous institution. I had waited 1 year for the appointment. She explained to me that she could pinpoint things like Celiac Disease. I told her it was certainly a possibility I had it because it runs in my family. She asked me if I had the Celiac Blood Test (accuracy rate = 60%). I said the result was negative and so she ended the appointment and said there was nothing she could do for me. AHHH!!

Did I follow doctors' advice? They had none to give. Well, the allergist (5 minute visit) said it was because I was a vegetarian and that "this happens a lot to vegetarians because they can't get any vitamin A." (?????). I took his advice, ate meat for a month and my symptoms did not improve. These last five years, I've learned that if you don't have the normal health problems like diabetes, cancer, a broken leg or a gun shot wound, they don't have a clue and do NOT want to spend the time.

I did find a very kind general practitioner who would see me up to 20 minutes every few months. She told me that I could tell HER what blood test to give me since she had no clue where to start. So I would try to do the research at home (VERY DIFFICULT when sleepy!) and would tell her which test I wanted. In the end, I had done most of them, but she did not inform me that the medical blood tests are not very accurate. :wacko:

So you see the chaos of my situation. :wall:

Edited by Dotty1

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And if an MD now says you have a severe case of hypothyroidism, have you not been prescribed thyroid hormone?

Rather a good point, but then 'tis replied:

Yes, I have spoken with an excellent MD friend online in another state but from what I understand I need to see an MD in person to get medication (I have an appointment 8 weeks from now). [...]I've read that many hypothyroid medications cause a host of side effects (hair loss, for example) and I'd prefer to go the natural route.

Send your test results to your MD friend. If your body isn't currently making thyroid hormones, you need a replacement. It it's merely impaired, then nutritional and lifestyle habits can improve it.

Delayed-type (IgG-mediated) allergic reactions can also cause fatigue. If I were you, I'd follow a hypo-allergenic, yet nutrient dense diet and healthy lifestyle habits involving sleep, light and physical activity. Period. It helps everything.

And whether or not your circadian cycle is a root cause, it's an important factor to health. Get up, go outside into the light and take a walk, several times a day. You do not need to feel energetic or good to take a walk. It will make you feel better. Then sleep at night in the dark from 10 or so to 8 or so.

And if you've been gluten intolerant and eating gluten all this time, you probably need to restore your intestinal linings. See the leaky gut and ZAG Enzyme/Lectin thread.

And because it can't be said enough:

What about just generally leading a healthy lifestyle with natural circadian cycle, stress management, physical activity and a nutrient dense, anti-inflammatory blood sugar stabilizing diet that doesn't include anything you have an intolerance for? Good for whatever ails you.

Edit:

From one of the sources you posted above:

You need a balanced diet with balanced minerals and trace elements to support your thyroid. No one mineral or trace mineral or ‘pill’ will do. Low protein and/or inappropriate fatty acids also decrease your body’s ability to produce hormones or increase cellular resistance to hormones. Making sure your diet contains adequate protein and potassium (see other pages) and that your supplements contain enough but not too much of essential elements may restore thyroid function, will support thyroid disease treatment and likely protect the healthy thyroid from disease.

Also, I have to wonder what difference it makes if your skin turns a little orange when you sleep 23 hours a day.

Edited by alternativista

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And if an MD now says you have a severe case of hypothyroidism, have you not been prescribed thyroid hormone?

Rather a good point, but then 'tis replied:

Yes, I have spoken with an excellent MD friend online in another state but from what I understand I need to see an MD in person to get medication (I have an appointment 8 weeks from now). [...]I've read that many hypothyroid medications cause a host of side effects (hair loss, for example) and I'd prefer to go the natural route.

Send your test results to your MD friend. If your body isn't currently making thyroid hormones, you need a replacement. It it's merely impaired, then nutritional and lifestyle habits can improve it.

Delayed-type (IgG-mediated) allergic reactions can also cause fatigue. If I were you, I'd follow a hypo-allergenic, yet nutrient dense diet and healthy lifestyle habits involving sleep, light and physical activity. Period. It helps everything.

And whether or not your circadian cycle is a root cause, it's an important factor to health. Get up, go outside into the light and take a walk, several times a day. You do not need to feel energetic or good to take a walk. It will make you feel better. Then sleep at night in the dark from 10 or so to 8 or so.

And if you've been gluten intolerant and eating gluten all this time, you probably need to restore your intestinal linings. See the leaky gut and ZAG Enzyme/Lectin thread.

And because it can't be said enough:

What about just generally leading a healthy lifestyle with natural circadian cycle, stress management, physical activity and a nutrient dense, anti-inflammatory blood sugar stabilizing diet that doesn't include anything you have an intolerance for? Good for whatever ails you.

Edit:

From one of the sources you posted above:

You need a balanced diet with balanced minerals and trace elements to support your thyroid. No one mineral or trace mineral or ‘pill’ will do. Low protein and/or inappropriate fatty acids also decrease your body’s ability to produce hormones or increase cellular resistance to hormones. Making sure your diet contains adequate protein and potassium (see other pages) and that your supplements contain enough but not too much of essential elements may restore thyroid function, will support thyroid disease treatment and likely protect the healthy thyroid from disease.

Also, I have to wonder what difference it makes if your skin turns a little orange when you sleep 23 hours a day.

I'll certainly try to implement these ideas into my routine.

I am no longer sleeping 23 hours a day because I know what foods to avoid, so now I can worry about my looks, LOL.

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I'll share what I've learned:

To increase beta carotene conversion to vitamin A:

Needed: Optimum levels of zinc, bile salts and enzymes.

Zinc --The "Zinc Taste Test" is one pretty reliable method to determine whether an individual has enough zinc.

Bile Salt -- Fat must be present in the meal with the beta carotene. Because some individuals with Celiac Disease and other health issues cannot absorb fat very efficiently, some believe that swishing a fat around in your mouth for a few seconds before the meal helps to prepare the body for fat absorption. The basis of this belief is "digestion begins in the mouth."

Edited by Dotty1

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I'll share what I've learned:

To increase beta carotene conversion to vitamin A:

Needed: Optimum levels of zinc, bile salts and enzymes.

Zinc --The "Zinc Taste Test" is one pretty reliable method to determine whether an individual has enough zinc.

Bile Salt -- Fat must be present in the meal with the beta carotene. Because some individuals with Celiac Disease and other health issues cannot absorb fat very efficiently, some believe that swishing a fat around in your mouth for a few seconds before the meal helps to prepare the body for fat absorption. The basis of this belief is "digestion begins in the mouth."

This is absolutely fascinating! I used to be able to eat carrots, sweet potatoes, and squash with no problem. Now, my hands are permanently orange from eating a large carrot or two a day, and when I eat sweet potatoes and squash, my face turns orange.

I recently have started suspecting that my large bean consumption in the last few months (about 3/4lb a day) is contributing to a malabsorption of zinc. That would make sense as to why I used to be able to eat high beta carotene foods with no problem but no longer can.

I am severely cutting back on my bean consumption starting today. I have cleared up a good amount lately from taking a high quality zinc supplement (along with a million other dietary and lifestyle changes I have made over the last year), but I can't seem to get completely clear. Perhaps I am just not absorbing enough zinc. I have always had very, very poor wound healing, which I think is a sign of zinc deficiency.

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