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uncle buck

Anyone here make their own soup?

I'm delving into the realm of making soup and looking for advice and tips and recipes. I often have leftover bones from chicken or other animals that i'd like to start boiling for some soup stock. I've read that it's a good idea to put a bit of Apple Cider Vinegar in while boiling to help draw out some of the nutrients from the bone, is there any truth to this? This wouldn't make it taste too vinegary would it? I like a bit of ACV sometimes but it doesn't sound like it'd be good in soup.

Also what vegetables would be a good addition to soup, any that wouldn't get completely destroyed by the heat?

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I usually prefer a tomato broth for my soup. Then I use brown rice as the "filler" part and then throw in onions, squashed tomatoes, sliced zucchini, celery, parsley, carrots and a number of other veggies. Then I sprinkle the soup with salt, white pepper and curry.

You might be interested in looking into "raw soups" too. Those can be quite fun and tasty. They only take 3 minutes to make. Using a blender, add 1 cup of water (add more if you feel eventually needs to be more watery). 1 avocado, a few sprigs of of broccoli, 1/2 carrot, 1/2 stick celery, a little parsley, 1 tomato, a little onion, plenty of sea salt, a little white pepper. Blend until smooth and creamy. You can warm it without killing the enzymes. This is a great way to get all the enzymes still in tact and the nutrition :). Makes perhaps 3 servings.

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oh yes!

I usually start by putting a little olive oil, onions, and garlic in the pan. Saute for just like 2-3 minutes. Then I add several cups of water and a little bit of organic veggie base or broth. Once this is hot, I add yellow squash, carrots, zucchini, cabbage, more onion and garlic, curry powder, cumin, chili powder, salt, pepper... anything I have laying around that sounds good! I let it sit on the stove for a few hours, and towards the end I add a handful of fresh spinach and chopped green onion. yum yum.

I have no idea about the nutrients being destroyed though.. anyone have any suggestions for my recipe?

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Lots of onions and garlic both when you make stock and again in the soup. you put the hard/aromatic veggies like onions, garlic, carrots, celery in early. In fact, you can saute and let them brown a bit then deglaze with the stock. Quick cooking things like tomatoes, cabbage when the hard things are done, other greens in pretty much when you are ready to turn off the heat, although kale can use a few minutes of cooking.

Also, whenever you are cooking you can throw scraps into a pot with water to simmer into veggie broth. Onion peels and ends, cabbage cores, the ends you cut off of whatever.

I actually rarely use pre made stock or broth, I just use a lot of aromatic veggies and water. But they are handy for making a quick soup. And it's good to not waste you bones and scraps.

And making stock from bones is a good topic for the Weston Price foundation. One of the few they are good for.

Edited by alternativista

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I'm delving into the realm of making soup and looking for advice and tips and recipes. I often have leftover bones from chicken or other animals that i'd like to start boiling for some soup stock. I've read that it's a good idea to put a bit of Apple Cider Vinegar in while boiling to help draw out some of the nutrients from the bone, is there any truth to this? This wouldn't make it taste too vinegary would it? I like a bit of ACV sometimes but it doesn't sound like it'd be good in soup.

Also what vegetables would be a good addition to soup, any that wouldn't get completely destroyed by the heat?

I've never heard of the ACV thing but that doesn't mean anything. There's a lot of stuff I haven't heard of. :P

Cauliflower and carrots immediately come to mind. You can even puree them a tad to get a thicker soup. I don't know of any recipes offhand for a stock, but Joy of Cooking has great recipes overall, including for soup.

Onions, many spices/herbs work really well in soup! Cabbage of course. I like veggies that soften but can retain a shape.

Meat tastes particularly good in soup when it's browned first. Sautee with onions and garlic (or spices of your choice!) and then put into soup.

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I've heard digging out the marrow of chicken bones, steak bones add flavor to the soup. I haven't tried it though.

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Yes, an acidic medium helps draw more minerals out of bones and cartilage for long-simmered stocks and broths.

Pick yourself up a copy of Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon. There are a few sections in that book devoted to traditional soup & stock making. Over the last few months I have been including lots of slow-simmered homemade stocks and I swear it is the greatest thing ever.

Fish heads & bones, chicken bones, feet, beef marrow bones- these are all things that have been consumed by people globally for thousands if not millions of years, and they are pretty much inexistent in our modern diets (still used in Europe and Asia a ton...).

Your body gets so many beneficial nutrients that are hard to obtain elsewhere, and some of the components are even taken as expensive supplements which is of course ridiculous. Someone pays $50 for a collagen supplement, when $2 of chicken feet could give them an insanely collagen-rich, delicious and nourishing broth.

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Someone pays $50 for a collagen supplement, when $2 of chicken feet could give them an insanely collagen-rich, delicious and nourishing broth.

That is insane because collagen has to be made in place by your body.

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I like to make the following:

Chicken tortilla soup (w/o the tortillas):

I like to make a chicken stock with leftover roasted chicken. Simmer the leftovers with onion, garlic, celery and carrots. Or you can use a quality natural broth or stock.

Strain the broth and remove meat from bones and add meat to the broth. Add in cilantro leaves/stocks, pico de gallo (or tomatoes, serrano or jalapeno peppers, onions and lime juice). Sea salt and pepper to taste if needed. Serve it up with some avocado and a sprinkle of cheese if you do dairy. It is SO GOOD!

Taco soup is good too. Brown ground meat of choice, add beef stock, onions, tomatoes, cumin, chili powder. Add whatever you want like pinto or black beans.

Simple saimin is good too. I use chicken or beef stock, meat of choice, cabbage, shallots, garlic, sesame oil, jalapeno, carrot, dash of tamari and bean thread noodles. Add whatever you want, sometimes I add a dash of fish sauce. Really easy to make and very flavorful.

Soups are a good way to use up leftovers. I'll just throw together leftover meat and add in a bunch of veggies. I have some leftover buffalo sausage that I plan on making into a soup tonight. Any great ideas of what I should add to it?

Edited by clc111

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I like to make the following:

Chicken tortilla soup (w/o the tortillas):

I like to make a chicken stock with leftover roasted chicken. Simmer the leftovers with onion, garlic, celery and carrots. Or you can use a quality natural broth or stock.

Strain the broth and remove meat from bones and add meat to the broth. Add in cilantro leaves/stocks, pico de gallo (or tomatoes, serrano or jalapeno peppers, onions and lime juice). Sea salt and pepper to taste if needed. Serve it up with some avocado and a sprinkle of cheese if you do dairy. It is SO GOOD!

You definitely want the lime juice.

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Ok my first attempt was really crappy. I boiled some chicken bones for about 2 hours and the result was basically just watery chicken. Real watery, and clear and thin. It tasted ALRIGHT but really underwhelming. The good news is that I couldn't taste the ACV that I put in, about two spoonfuls, not even a trace of it by the end. The aftertaste is pretty good too, my mind feels sharp.

Next time I might add some more stuff to make it thicker. And maybe boil the bones for longer, they seemed a bit too intact by the end of it.

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Hmm, or you could just read about how to do it properly...

This isn't something that requires guesswork and experimentation. It is pretty well established how to make good soup stocks.

The best stocks are long, slow simmered!

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Thanks but I read in many places 2 hours was a good length. The internet huh, what a place. Next one will be 4 hours!

Edited by uncle buck

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