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molly999

Nd-YAG laser

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hi

i was woundering has anyone ever been treated with the Nd-YAG laser and if so what did you think of the results?

i believe it is one of three lasers used in laser resurfacing (CO2, Erbrium been the other two).

however this laser is suppose to produce better results because it can go deeper!

molly

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anyone!

i am thinking of getting this treatment done and althought i did a google search i would love to hear from people who had this treatment.

molly

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so anyways i decided to go ahead and get this treatment.

i only got it done a two days ago so i cants see anything yet as my face is completely covered with jelly.

so hopefully in a week bb_eusa_pray.gif

moly

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Good luck with your healing. I thought it was the Erbium Yag laser. Is

the Nd-Yag different and do you know what makes it different? I think I vaguely

recall a derm talking about this new laser. What does Yag mean?

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some infos i found about ND YAG lazer ...

Study Finds New Laser Treatment Helps Heal the Physical and Emotional Scars of Acne

Acne is a common medical condition that affects up to 80 percent of people between 11 and 30 years of age. Even after the unsightly whiteheads, blackheads and pustules have been successfully treated, many people are left with disfiguring acne scars that serve as a cruel reminder of this difficult condition. Oftentimes, the scars can be just as devastating as the acne they replaced.

Speaking today at Academy 2001, the American Academy of Dermatology’s summer scientific meeting in Anaheim, Calif., dermatologist Mitchel Goldman, MD, Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of California at San Diego, discussed results of his study on patients treated with a new laser surgery option for acne scarring, as well as other common treatments.

A new device known as the 1320 nm Nd: YAG laser with dynamic epidermal cooling shows promising results in treating acne scarring. The only infrared laser systems cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for treating wrinkles, this non-invasive laser technology works by stimulating collagen formation in the dermis ? or deepest layer of the skin ? which raises the acne scar.

In a study conducted by Drs. Goldman, Elizabeth Roston and Richard Fitzpatrick, 14 patients with depressed acne scars were treated with a 1320 nm Nd: YAG laser over four separate treatments spaced three weeks apart. By the end of the last treatment, seven patients experienced a 50 percent improvement in the appearance of their acne scars. Improvement was defined as how much the depressed acne scars were elevated following treatment. All patients showed an average 40 percent improvement in the appearance of their acne scars.

"The 1320 nm Nd: YAG laser is an excellent new method for treating acne scars because it works for all skin types ? from very dark to very light ? and with no downtime," explained Dr. Goldman. "Until now, many of the other acne scar treatments produced a wound that may have required weeks to heal. Since this new laser therapy is non-invasive, the patient does not require anesthesia and the procedure is not a painful one."

Other lasers, such as the pulse dye laser and intense pulse light, also work in elevating depressed acne scars by penetrating the dermis and producing new dermal collagen to elevate the depression. The pulse dye laser produces a bruise that can last one to two weeks. In addition, the Erbium:YAG laser allows for very precise sculpting of acne scars. With this laser, recovery times are faster ? usually three to five days ? with a shorter period of post-surgery redness than with the CO2 laser for acne scar correction.

Dermabrasion is another effective method to treat acne scars that involves the mechanical sanding of the upper layers of the scar. With this procedure, a new layer of skin replaces the abraded skin during healing, resulting in a smoother appearance. Although dermabrasion is an invasive procedure that requires anesthesia, most patients heal within one to two weeks.

For severely depressed scars, more invasive techniques are required. Subcision is a procedure that uses a surgical probe to lift up the skin that pulls away from the depressed scar tissue below. After the scar is released, the patient’s own fat or another substance like collagen can be used to elevate the scar.

"Acne scars that require surgical excision are usually followed by laser resurfacing or dermabrasion to erase the surgical excision line," added Dr. Goldman.

Another type of acne scarring is elevated scars, which are usually red in appearance. Lasers, such as the pulse dye laser and intense pulse light, work by eliminating the excessive blood vessels that give elevated scars their appearance. Elevated scars can also be treated with injections of intralesional 5% 5-FU, which works by breaking down the scar causing the acne scar to flatten. Intralesional 5% 5-FU is preferred over steroids because it does not cause a depression or the formation of new blood vessels that steroids can.

Patients with very mild acne scarring are also good candidates for microdermabrasion, a technique in which aluminum oxide, and silicon or salt crystals passing through a vacuum tube gently scrapes away the scarred skin. With this procedure, new cell growth is stimulated. While microdermabrasion is a quick procedure that leaves the patient with only minimal redness, patients will often require multiple treatments and the results are not as dramatic as other procedures.

"Today, patients have more options than ever to treat acne scars," said Dr. Goldman. "Dermatologists can help patients choose the best treatment options for their particular kind of acne scars. Acne scarring no longer has to be a constant reminder of the physical and emotional pain that accompanies acne."

For more information on related products and services, please choose from the following menu of items:

On the left is the procedure / on the right is "how deep" it goes.

1 ) Diamond Dermabrasion (microdermabrasion) --- 10 microns - 100 microns

2 ) Erbium YAG laser --- 25-30 microns per pass (several passes or treatments of Yag are common of course)

3 ) Chemical Peel with 10-25% (TCA) --- Superficial wound to papillary dermis (is so mild it cannot really be measured in microns)

4 ) Chemical Peel with 35% (TCA) --- 75 microns (medium depth wound to upper reticular dermis)

5 ) Chemical Peel with 50% phenol --- 100 microns

6 ) Chemical Peel, Bakers formula --- Deep peel, wound to mid reticular dermis

and for the deepest of scars...

7 ) CO2 laser dermabrasion --- 100-150 microns per pass (several passes over particular areas will go deeper)

8 ) Mechanical dermabrasion --- 350 microns

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I've seen this article before. The 1320nm laser referred to in the article is the Cooltouch laser. The article says it is non-invasive. I don't think this is the laser Molly used since she is slathering vaseline.

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hi

thanks tomorrowneverknows i seen this articale also but is was not the laser i got treated with because mine was invasive.

it has been nearly 2 months since i had the yag laser. it definently improved the scars on my face. the recovery period was much shorter than with the ebrium laser (which i has done twice before) and there is no redness left now at all except what was there before. also my skin feels so much more healthier and it does not have that waxy look that was left with other laser.

i also tried the tca comples and a blue peel but this was definently the most successfully scar treatment i have had to date.

however as my scars were extremely deep eusa_wall.gif i still have some scars left and am thinking of gettting The Polaris laser.

so i was just woundering did anyone get this done as it is a very new laser and has just recently been approved by the FDA.

thanks guys

molly

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molly999, I'm sorry to say that deep scars can not be helped very much by lasers. You can research better treatments such as fillers, punch grafts, and TCA Cross. 3 passes of a CO2 laser (the strongest one) might help the scars for a few years, but the side effects are serious. Good luck

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molly999, I'm sorry to say that deep scars can not be helped very much by lasers. You can research better treatments such as fillers, punch grafts, and TCA Cross. 3 passes of a CO2 laser (the strongest one) might help the scars for a few years, but the side effects are serious. Good luck

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yea when i did a search on the net it mainly talkted about a Nd Yag laser that is not invasive however the laser i got was definently invasive the areas treated was raw just like after the erbrium laser however not as red and took less time to heal and healed much better.

i also seen reallly good results with this laser.

but i was just woundering did anyone ever try the polaris laser it work in th esame way as isologen but it is cheaper. ie it stimulates collagen growth and it takes months to see results.

molly

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OG, I'm curious, why do you think SB is the best of all the lasers? Do you think it is best for certain kinds of scars, or certain depths of scars, i.e., shallow, moderate, deep?

I heard one account of a person experiencing fat loss on another board, but so far, that is the only account of fat loss I have heard in regards to SB.

I know it is supposed to be very good for acne, which would be worth it in itself.

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Emma, I have looked at lots of studies and they show that the Smoothbeam is the best one out there right now. It may work for shallow to moderate. I don't care about that though, I just put 100% tca in some pits. eusa_naughty.gif

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I am going to get some fillers this month-end. Do you think it will affect future smoothbeam sessions as in I cannot do too many or the effects will not be so good or anything like that?

thanks

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Scholar12345678, I asked the people that sell Smoothbeam and Restylane that same question. Here is what they said:

This was from the company that sells Restylane in the U.S.

Thank you for contacting Medicis Aesthetics.

Restylane® has been approved by the FDA for use in the United States, and

is now available to physicians.

We do not have any studies in connection with Smoothbeam and/or Vbeam

treatments. In theory it would make sense to implement the lasers prior to

the Restylane then you would not have to worry about the product dissipating

under the other treatment. But again, there are no definitive studies on

the matter. Your doctor would be able to best advise you.

This was from the company that sells Smoothbeam

You should discuss this concern w/ the provider who plans to perform the

procedure for you.

Please contract me if you have further questions or concerns.

This is what my plastic surgeon said

I am not sure.

This is what I said to myself, after their responses

You're all retarded.

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Scholar12345678, I asked the people that sell Smoothbeam and Restylane that same question. Here is what they said:

This was from the company that sells Restylane in the U.S.

Thank you for contacting Medicis Aesthetics.

Restylane® has been approved by the FDA for use in the United States, and

is now available to physicians. 

We do not have any studies in connection with Smoothbeam and/or Vbeam

treatments.  In theory it would make sense to implement the lasers prior to

the Restylane then you would not have to worry about the product dissipating

under the other treatment.  But again, there are no definitive studies on

the matter.  Your doctor would be able to best advise you.

This was from the company that sells Smoothbeam

You should discuss this concern w/ the provider who plans to perform the

procedure for you.

Please contract me if you have further questions or concerns.

This is what my plastic surgeon said

I am not sure.

This is what I said to myself, after their responses

You're all retarded.

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hi

i was woundering has anyone ever been treated with the Nd-YAG laser and if so what did you think of the results?

i believe it is one of three lasers used in laser resurfacing (CO2, Erbrium been the other two).

however this laser is suppose to produce better results because it can go deeper!

molly

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I haven't done the Yag laser, and was getting pretty disappointed in Smoothbeam but now, 2 days after my 6th session, I can see that the pitted scarring on my nose is smaller (or just tighter so that it appears smaller). If this is actually the collagen finally coming in then I am going to be so happy! eusa_dance.gif

But it does take a long time to see ANY kind of result at all, so if you are looking for a quick fix, smoothbeam ain't it. As for permanence, I'll just have to wait and see.

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