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Paul25

Homemade probiotic yogurt

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Does anyone here make there own probiotic yogurt? If so has it been very helpful with your skin, digestion etc. Also what is the best way to go about making it?

Thanks

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Buy a yogurt maker/incubator that can keep the yogurt at 110 degrees for 12-24 hours. My yogurt maker has 5 8oz glass cups that go in it.

I bring 4 1/2 cups of milk to 180 degrees over the stove using a candy thermometer and then turn it off. Wait about an hour and the milk will have cooled to around 115-110 degrees. Check with the thermometer to make sure it's not any higher. Put about a 1/4cup - 1/2 cup yogurt from a plain yogurt container that was store-bought that has the LAC (live and active cultures) seal into the milk and mix up (this is only if you don't have a starter). If you have any additional probiotics in a pill-form that you would like to add, stir them in as well. Pour the milk into the individual cups, cover and leave in incubator for 12-24 hours. You will see in 12 hours that the yogurt will look like yogurt but you may want to leave it to ferment longer to get rid of more of the lactose. When it's done pour out the liquid at the top (whey/water...whatever) and push down the caps (you don't have to push them down firmly while it's incubating because I like to fill mine up high and it would spill otherwise). Put them in the fridge or enjoy right then. Add a ton of cinnamon for antifungal purposes.

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As i dont have a yogurt maker i had a look for what other sites mentioned and one said to pour the yogurt and milk into a pan and wrap a towel around it. Then just leave it on a heating pad and leave for 6-8 hours and maybe even more. Does this sound alright?

Also i was having a look through my fridge for probiotic yogurts and found one but it has 6.6 grams of which sugars. Would this be a problem for candida at all and does it matter what sort of milk you use?

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As i dont have a yogurt maker i had a look for what other sites mentioned and one said to pour the yogurt and milk into a pan and wrap a towel around it. Then just leave it on a heating pad and leave for 6-8 hours and maybe even more. Does this sound alright?

Also i was having a look through my fridge for probiotic yogurts and found one but it has 6.6 grams of which sugars. Would this be a problem for candida at all and does it matter what sort of milk you use?

Did you check the ingredients or are you just going by the label? All milk has natural sugar (lactose) in it and it is necessary to make the cultures grow. Even if you make yogurt from coconut milk, you'd just have to add sugar in some form. With milk you already have that pre-done and lactose takes awhile to digest so it's one of the "better" sugars in this case. I don't think it's a big deal because the maximum sugar you can remove from a cup of milk is like 8 grams and I believe there are 12 grams per cup. If it bothers you, you could always strain the milk through a cheesecloth and make yogurt cheese. Most of the sugar from yogurt collects in the whey liquid. However, if you aren't following the candida diet, there is no point in straining the yogurt.

If you want to see if the heating pad is a good idea, put a pan of water on top of it and wrap the towel around it and measure the temperature in an hour. If it goes over 115, try lowering the setting or don't use it.

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You can use a heating pad, although you may want to test the temperatures to decide which setting to use so it doesn't get too hot. One issue with them is that most turn themselves off after a bit. Mine do. But the yogurt still grows even though the heat went off for most of the night.

I even used to make yogurt by setting it outside on 80 degree summer nights.

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I live in Houston, where it never gets really cold, but I really never overthink making yogurt. Just boil milk to get rid of putrefying bacteria, let it cool, add some store bought yogurt or other lactobacillus capsules, and let it sit in the oven for a day or so :)

Sometimes overanalyzing takes the pleasure out of the simple things :P

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I live in Houston, where it never gets really cold, but I really never overthink making yogurt. Just boil milk to get rid of putrefying bacteria, let it cool, add some store bought yogurt or other lactobacillus capsules, and let it sit in the oven for a day or so :)

Sometimes overanalyzing takes the pleasure out of the simple things :P

Me too. That's the town with the 80 degree lows where I made yogurt by setting it outside.

Remember that people have been making yogurt for thousands of years. Without yogurt makers or heating pads.

Edited by alternativista
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This is what I do:

-Approximately 1/4-1/2 c. yogurt with active cultures

-Approximately 1 qt. of milk (I use lactose free milk)

Set your oven to the lowest heat setting (most ovens have a "warm" setting).

Bring the milk to an almost boil in a saucepan-do not bring to a full boil. Turn off the oven at this point. Let the milk sit until it's just warm, and add it to the container with the yogurt in it. Use a lidded container so you can shake it to mix the ingredients. Place in oven overnight.

This works just fine for me.

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Has anyone ever noticed this improve their acne?

I never like to say that once certain food "improves acne". You could say "Carrots improve acne!" or "Eating broccoli helps acne!". Basically, if it's healthy, it's going to be good for your skin. I don't eat hardly any dairy except for yogurt, which helps my digestion with it's probiotics and such. So yes, yogurt is good for your body by helping you digest other foods more thoroughly, and is therefore good your your skin.

That's just holistic thinking ;)

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Has anyone ever noticed this improve their acne?

I never like to say that once certain food "improves acne". You could say "Carrots improve acne!" or "Eating broccoli helps acne!". Basically, if it's healthy, it's going to be good for your skin. I don't eat hardly any dairy except for yogurt, which helps my digestion with it's probiotics and such. So yes, yogurt is good for your body by helping you digest other foods more thoroughly, and is therefore good your your skin.

That's just holistic thinking ;)

I was wondering because I need more probiotics. I take supplements but nothing is more fullproof than getting it from actual food sources I think, and probiotics in the past have made a dramatic difference in my skin. I'm thinking about making my own yogurt, and hoping that it will be enough probiotics :)

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I have a question here...

I looked up steps to make yogurt in a crockpot and here they are:

I. Pour half gallon of organic milk in crockpot. Leave on low for 2.5 hours.

II. Unplug crockpot. Leave cover on. Let sit for 3 hours.

III. After 3 hours whisk 1/2 cup of yogurt into milk.

IV. Keep crockpot unplugged and wrap in a towel. Leave over night or for 8 hours.

So my question is; if I want to add in probiotic capsules, when do I do it? At the very beginning in the milk or when I put the yogurt in?

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