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Dotty1

List of most common food sensitivities & Floating Stool Test

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I found this on a baby website. It is the most common food sensitivities and it happens to match many of the food sensitivities that seem to cause acne on this forum. The foods that make up 90% of sensitivities are listed in bold.

o berries (not blueberries or cranberries.)

o chocolate

o cinnamon (may cause rashes)

o citrus fruits (acidic)

o coconut

o corn

o dairy products

o egg whites

o mustard

o nuts

o peas

o peanut butter

o pork

o shellfish

o soy

o strawberries

o wheat

o yeast

So far, I have sensitivities to wheat (gluten), yeast, soy and tomatoes (possibly citrus).

Floating Stool Test

Stools float when they are not absorbing nutrients correctly. Floating stools are full of fats and fats are the most easily digested nutrients. If the body could not absorb fat from the food, it did not absorb vitamins, minerals and many other nutrients. Stools usually float the day after eating a food that was not well tolerated (food allergy, food intolerance, food sensitivity, etc.).

Pick a food that is usually well tolerated like rice. Eat it for a day or two until your stools look normal (well shaped, firm and sinking in the toilet bowl). Then introduce a new food to your rice diet and consume large helpings of it throughout the day. Do this for two days and note the appearance of your stools. If your stools are sinking, switch to a third food.

The trick to this test is eating large servings of the food so that your stool sample has visible changes. For example, a few bites of tomatoes does not visibly change my stools. It causes a little floating, but nothing major. But when I ate 2 cups of tomato sauce on rice, I had a huge change in my bowel movement the next day.

Several servings of sauteed onions, or lots of tomato sauce on the rice, or plenty of nuts.

Give yourself two days with every food.

Edited by Dotty1

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This is interesting... I notice that mine randomly float or sink... It's not like they do one or the other ALL the time. Plus I eat a lot of the same food everyday, so I couldnt really connect anything with it. I'm not sure if I'd want to JUST eat rice for two days.... Have you done this?

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If your stools are randomly floating on a daily basis, this means that there is something in your diet which you are consuming that must cause an absorption problem at times.

Yes, I have eaten rice for up to a week when there was no food in the house LOL. Eating rice for two days won't hurt your body. There are many people on this forum who have tried eating one food for several days at a time. It is actually a common part of elimination diets and is suggested by medical practitioners when trying to pinpoint food triggers.

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If your stools are randomly floating on a daily basis, this means that there is something in your diet which you are consuming that must cause an absorption problem at times.

Yes, I have eaten rice for up to a week when there was no food in the house LOL. Eating rice for two days won't hurt your body. There are many people on this forum who have tried eating one food for several days at a time. It is actually a common part of elimination diets and is suggested by medical practitioners when trying to pinpoint food triggers.

Sounds interesting, JUST rice? This could take SOOO long though. Introducing food in one by one an dthen waiting until you poo to see what it looks like haha.

Anyway, I know for a fact that I dont digest fats properly, I break out if I eat high fat foods. ESPECIALLY avocado, I get massive white heads from them and sometimes cysts. Nuts can be bad too if I eat too many. I usually notice that if I've eaten a lot of fats, the stools float... that's the only correlation I can really make. I feel like I almost need to just find something that will help me digest fats properly. The only things I can relaly think of are digestive enzymes and b vitamins. However I CANNOT take digestive enzymes because they KILL my stomach... ugh. And I take b vitamines all the time... doesnt seem to do much. F R U S T RA T I N G.

I might try out this rice thing for a week just to see how it goes though. Thanks for all the info!

By the way.... I've never understood why pork is on the list of foods people react to...? I eat organic ground pork once in a while... it's the cheapest organic meat y ou can get and I love the taste of it.

Edited by tdot

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Tdot, if your body cannot digest fats properly, you should not purchase supplements that digest fats for your body. You should focus on the underlying cause of why your body can't do such a simple task.

Two years ago, I discovered my body could not break down any protein properly. I had cystic acne 12 hours after eating any protein (meat, dairy, eggs, nuts, soy, beans, tofu). So I did not eat those foods for 1.5 years because my acne was so painful. (Side note: I discovered I remained quite healthy when obtaining small amounts of protein in broccoli, potatoes, kale and other veggies :think:).

I found that my body could not digest protein because I have Celiac Disease and a tomato sensitivity. These two foods prevent my system from digesting proteins properly. I might have a citrus sensitivity, too.

Good luck!!

Edited by Dotty1

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tdot, try the most common trigger foods first:

o Dairy

o Egg

o Nuts (walnut, cashew, peanut etc.)

o Citrus fruits (tomatoes, berries, lemons, limes, etc.)

o Soy

o Wheat (gluten)

I think this is the entire list? It looks like I'm missing a few though :think:

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tdot, try the most common trigger foods first:

o Dairy

o Egg

o Nuts (walnut, cashew, peanut etc.)

o Citrus fruits (tomatoes, berries, lemons, limes, etc.)

o Soy

o Wheat (gluten)

I think this is the entire list? It looks like I'm missing a few though :think:

Thanks for the info Dotty :). I'm going to cut all of those foods out for a couple weeks to see what happens. I have already cut out soy dairy and wheat. I know for a fact that dairy causes me large cysts... and so I took it out of my diet... but I STILL break out. Ugh this is going to be very annoying. Good thing my boyfriend isnt here for a couple weeks, he would kill me if he knew I was doing this. He thinks my acne is a lost cause and there's nothing I can do about it. I annoy him so much with my food experiments.

Eggs and nuts are going to be the hardest, I LOVE them both. What can I replace my eggs with for breakfast? I'm already stressing out... I'm going to lose too much weight doing this.

I'm at work right now STARVING, I need breakfast and there's nothing to eat around here.

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tdot, try the most common trigger foods first:

o Dairy

o Egg

o Nuts (walnut, cashew, peanut etc.)

o Citrus fruits (tomatoes, berries, lemons, limes, etc.)

o Soy

o Wheat (gluten)

I think this is the entire list? It looks like I'm missing a few though :think:

Statement from the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network:

'Although an individual could be allergic to any food, such as fruits, vegetables, and meats, there are eight foods that account for 90% of all food-allergic reactions. These are: milk, egg, peanut, tree nut (walnut, cashew, etc.), fish, shellfish, soy, and wheat.'

Also, tomatoes and berries are not citrus!!! And few people are allergic to lemons which appear on lists of hypoallergenic foods.

Hey I was searching the internet for allergy testing centers and I found this site:

http://www.testyourintoleranceusa.com/ContactUs.html

There are links to many very good threads about intolerances and testing here:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/index.php...t&p=2574130

Edited by alternativista

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Tdot: I have been researching food sensitivity testing for about two weeks now. I have found three tests which are reputedly the most accurate for food sensitivities.

First of all, there is a difference between an allergy and a sensitivity and there are separate tests for each:

Allergies are reactions that usually occur within 20 minutes of ingesting the offending food and usually result in burning lips, hives, anaphylactic shock, runny nose, watery eyes. Only 3% of the population has an allergic reaction.

Food sensitivity (or food intolerance) are reactions that usually occur within 72 hours of ingesting the offending food and usually result in fatigue, headaches, inflammation within the body (whether it is in the form of acne or inflammation of old injuries), mood swings, anxiety and personality changes. It is commonly stated that up to 20% of the population has underlying food sensitivities and is a common cause of acne.

------------------------------------------------------

Food sensitivities require certain tests and so far I have found three labs which appear to be the best options:

EnteroLabs - They can test for 5 foods now via stool sample - Gluten, soy, yeast, egg and dairy. They can correctly catch a gluten sensitivity (or Celiac Disease) when the Celiac blood test and Celiac biopsy cannot. They count how many white blood cells form around the offending food in the intestines. I took this test three months ago and was told that I could not eat gluten, yeast and soy. When I removed these three foods from my diet, my health definitely improved. My acne has only improved by 10%, so I believe there is another trigger food in my diet. Each of their test panels are $99. Feel free to call this lab and ask questions about the tests. www.EnteroLab.com

ALCAT - A blood test created about 30 years ago that detects how the white blood cells separate from the blood plasma when in the presence of various trigger foods. ALCAT is used in 15(?) European countries. ALCAT has an 84% accuracy rate and a 46% reproducibility rate. I have read that this test can find about 50% of food sensitivities. You can search for news coverage of this test by going to YouTube and searching for ALCAT. www.ALCAT.com

MRT Sensitivity Test- This is the newest version of the ALCAT test and was invented by the co-inventor of the ALCAT test. The MRT test is reputably more accurate than the ALCAT test and measures how much histamine is released from the white blood cells when in the presence of trigger foods. Although it is relatively new (15 years old), a peer-review journal in Europe and an independent study found that the MRT test has a 92% accuracy rating and a 94% reproducibility rate. It is offered at www.NowLEAP.com.

Edited by Dotty1

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eating rice doesn't affect your acne..im eating rice since i was a kid.

It breaks me out 100% of the time. Makes my face very oily by the next day and then inflammation occurs, large red bumps, and breakouts.

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That is very interesting that rice breaks you out. Does anyone know of a hypoallergenic staple that could be used during this diet? Sweet potatoes?

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Tdot: I have been researching food sensitivity testing for about two weeks now. I have found three tests which are reputedly are the most accurate for food sensitivities.

First of all, there is a difference between an allergy and a sensitivity and there are separate tests for each:

Allergies are reactions that usually occur within 20 minutes of ingesting the offending food and usually result in burning lips, hives, anaphylactic shock, runny nose, watery eyes. Only 3% of the population has an allergic reaction.

Food sensitivity (or food intolerance) are reactions that usually occur within 72 hours of ingesting the offending food and usually result in fatigue, headaches, inflammation within the body (whether it is in the form of acne or inflammation of old injuries), mood swings, anxiety and personality changes. It is commonly stated that up to 20% of the population has underlying food sensitivities and is a common cause of acne.

------------------------------------------------------

Food sensitivities require certain tests and so far I have found three labs which appear to be the best options:

EnteroLabs - They can test for 5 foods now via stool sample - Gluten, soy, yeast, egg and dairy. They can correctly catch a gluten sensitivity (or Celiac Disease) when the Celiac blood test and Celiac biopsy cannot. They take a count how many white blood cells form around the offending food in the intestines. I took this test three months ago and was told that I could not eat gluten, yeast and soy. When I removed these three foods from my diet, my health definitely improved. My acne has only improved by 10%, so I believe there is another trigger food in my diet. Each of their test panels are $99. Feel free to call this lab and ask questions about the tests. www.EnteroLab.com

ALCAT - A blood test created about 30 years ago that detects how the white blood cells separate from the blood plasma when in the presence of various trigger foods. ALCAT is used in 15(?) European countries. ALCAT has an 84% accuracy rate and a 46% reproducibility rate. I have read that this test can find about 50% of food sensitivities. You can search for news coverage of this test by going to YouTube and searching for ALCAT. www.ALCAT.com

MRT Sensitivity Test- This is the newest version of the ALCAT test and was invented by the co-inventor of the ALCAT test. The MRT test is reputably more accurate than the ALCAT test and measures how much histamine is released from the white blood cells when in the presence of trigger foods. Although it is relatively new (15 years old), a peer-review journal in Europe and an independent study found that the MRT test has a 92% accuracy rating and a 94% reproducibility rate. It is offered at www.NowLEAP.com.

Thanks Dotty :). You are just full of info!

I think I have changed my mind on what I want to do though... I've been doing a lot of research and I think trying to get my liver healthy is going to be one of my first goals.

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"Actually, it is gas that does it. Increased levels of air and gas in the poop make it less dense, and cause it to float. Simple as that. Dietary changes can lead to an increase in the amount of gas produced by the bacteria that live in the gut."

If you use this knowledge then this test is pretty much BS. Actually gas would be more logical then fat and malbsorbtion. Maybe that can be a reason but only in extreme ways. On the other hand none of them is proven. But to do such an test on a theory that might not be true...

Btw my poop floats like hell. It goes up in a few seconds. But ive been having more gas lately and Im changing my diet...

Edited by joris

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I had my food intolerance testing earlier this year through the ALCAT lab is Florida. I have not eaten an egg since, per their recommendation, and I'd say my chronic hives are 95% better, my rosacea is 95% better, and my acne is 50% better. I've become the biggest fan of food intolerance testing on the planet! My internist drew blood, sent it to the FL lab, I went back to my internist for the results several weeks later, insurance covered some of the cost, my total out-of-pocket was $275. Money well spent me thinks, good luck!!!

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WOW does insurance cover that. I'll have to look into that. If it does im going for the most expensive one :D Or was it because you had rosacea?

Edited by joris

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This is definitly something that affects me, but I'm not sure how much I can remove from my diet. Like I said in another post I'll try to eat like I did in Greece.

So for now what I'm not going to consume is:

Dairy (yogurt, milk, etc., except a slice of feta cheese in my salads, since I could eat that in Greece)

Peanut butter

Fruits

Chocolate

Nuts

I didn't eat any of that in Greece and I was 100% clear, but I did eat some of that in Turkey when I started breaking out again, so we'll see.

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"Actually, it is gas that does it. Increased levels of air and gas in the poop make it less dense, and cause it to float. Simple as that. Dietary changes can lead to an increase in the amount of gas produced by the bacteria that live in the gut."

If you use this knowledge then this test is pretty much BS. Actually gas would be more logical then fat and malbsorbtion. Maybe that can be a reason but only in extreme ways. On the other hand none of them is proven. But to do such an test on a theory that might not be true...

Btw my poop floats like hell. It goes up in a few seconds. But ive been having more gas lately and Im changing my diet...

Thank you, Joris! I knew there was some confusion as to whether it was gas or fats left in the stool!

I used this method to discover my severe tomato sensitivity. I also seem to have a sensitivity to the frozen veggie package I've been eating for two weeks now (red bell peppers, onions, broccoli) because my poop stops floating when I stop eating it. I need to individually test each food now :think:.

And floating poop always shows a problem if it does not go away.

Edited by Dotty1

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I had my food intolerance testing earlier this year through the ALCAT lab is Florida. I have not eaten an egg since, per their recommendation, and I'd say my chronic hives are 95% better, my rosacea is 95% better, and my acne is 50% better. I've become the biggest fan of food intolerance testing on the planet! My internist drew blood, sent it to the FL lab, I went back to my internist for the results several weeks later, insurance covered some of the cost, my total out-of-pocket was $275. Money well spent me thinks, good luck!!!

I have been researching ALCAT for about 3 weeks now. It is interesting that you mention that your acne is 50% better because the reproducibility of their tests is about 46%, meaning they can pinpoint roughly 50% of food triggers.

I was about to take an ALCAT test but found a new version of ALCAT called an MRT test which was invented by the co-inventor of ALCAT. The ALCAT test has an accuracy of 84% and a reproducibility rate of 46%. The MRT Test has an accuracy of 92% and a reproducibility of 94%,

How each test works:

ALCAT examines how the white blood cells separate from the blood plasma while in the presence of food triggers. On the other hand, the MRT test measures how much histamine is released from the individual white blood cells.

I was about to get an ALCAT test but I've decided to get an MRT test instead. The two labs are here:

www.alcat.com

www.nowleap.com

Good luck!

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Hi, regarding Joris' question about insurance coverage, my internist highlighted the chronic hives (urticaria) to get my insurance coverage to cover at least part of the cost. My hives had gotten very bad in addition to my other skin issues. I had been to an allergist 3 years earlier, and he had discerned I was allergic to salicylates (advil, aspirin, certain foods), and I had never had another advil again. But the hives ultimately got worse, and my internist agreed to food intolerance testing as the next step. I've been very disciplined about eliminating everything that they told me to eliminate except coffee, which I'm still 'working on.' But I did eliminate eggs, basil, mushrooms, barley, squash and sweet potato 100%. And all of my skin issues are better, truly, thank goodness. :)

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Hi, regarding Joris' question about insurance coverage, my internist highlighted the chronic hives (urticaria) to get my insurance coverage to cover at least part of the cost. My hives had gotten very bad in addition to my other skin issues. I had been to an allergist 3 years earlier, and he had discerned I was allergic to salicylates (advil, aspirin, certain foods), and I had never had another advil again. But the hives ultimately got worse, and my internist agreed to food intolerance testing as the next step. I've been very disciplined about eliminating everything that they told me to eliminate except coffee, which I'm still 'working on.' But I did eliminate eggs, basil, mushrooms, barley, squash and sweet potato 100%. And all of my skin issues are better, truly, thank goodness. :)

That is great to hear it helped. :) I am very excited to try food sensivitivity testing via blood test. The stool test worked so well, but the lab is still in the process of expanding the list of foods.

I called and scheduled with ALCAT last week, and then thought I'd try the MRT test. I'm pretty excited ;).

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Hi, regarding Joris' question about insurance coverage, my internist highlighted the chronic hives (urticaria) to get my insurance coverage to cover at least part of the cost. My hives had gotten very bad in addition to my other skin issues. I had been to an allergist 3 years earlier, and he had discerned I was allergic to salicylates (advil, aspirin, certain foods), and I had never had another advil again. But the hives ultimately got worse, and my internist agreed to food intolerance testing as the next step. I've been very disciplined about eliminating everything that they told me to eliminate except coffee, which I'm still 'working on.' But I did eliminate eggs, basil, mushrooms, barley, squash and sweet potato 100%. And all of my skin issues are better, truly, thank goodness. :)

That is great to hear it helped. :) I am very excited to try food sensivitivity testing via blood test. The stool test worked so well, but the lab is still in the process of expanding the list of foods.

I called and scheduled with ALCAT last week, and then thought I'd try the MRT test. I'm pretty excited ;).

I think I might like to look into this while I'm doing the liver cleanse... maybe I can relieve my acne.

How do you get the MRT done? I went on the LEAP site and couldnt find anything about where or how you get it done....

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Hi, regarding Joris' question about insurance coverage, my internist highlighted the chronic hives (urticaria) to get my insurance coverage to cover at least part of the cost. My hives had gotten very bad in addition to my other skin issues. I had been to an allergist 3 years earlier, and he had discerned I was allergic to salicylates (advil, aspirin, certain foods), and I had never had another advil again. But the hives ultimately got worse, and my internist agreed to food intolerance testing as the next step. I've been very disciplined about eliminating everything that they told me to eliminate except coffee, which I'm still 'working on.' But I did eliminate eggs, basil, mushrooms, barley, squash and sweet potato 100%. And all of my skin issues are better, truly, thank goodness. :)

That is great to hear it helped. :) I am very excited to try food sensivitivity testing via blood test. The stool test worked so well, but the lab is still in the process of expanding the list of foods.

I called and scheduled with ALCAT last week, and then thought I'd try the MRT test. I'm pretty excited ;).

I think I might like to look into this while I'm doing the liver cleanse... maybe I can relieve my acne.

How do you get the MRT done? I went on the LEAP site and couldnt find anything about where or how you get it done....

There's a couple different ways to get it done. You can find a naturopath and get it through him or if your GP is cool, you can have him/her order it for you.

Depending on your condition and insurance, you might get part of it covered.

The prices I've seen from most holistic docs is anywhere between $250-350.

Just my two cents on this issue; I believe food sensitivities in most cases are a symptom of a larger issue. Once you find the cause and fix that, your food sensitivity will disappear as well. I realize this isn't ALWAYS the case, but more so than not I think it is.

To me its clear that Dotty is suffering from a chronic yeast over-growth, I believe she even said she had it when she was younger. Address the yeast and she'll be doing much much better.

PANIC

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