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willow569

Acne vulgaris--psychosomatic aspects

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Good to see that the psychological issues of having acne are becoming more acknowledged in the medical literature. Wish this one wasn't in German - I'd love to read the whole article!!

J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2010 Mar;8 Suppl 1:S95-104.

[Acne vulgaris--psychosomatic aspects]

[Article in German]

Niemeier V, Kupfer J, Gieler U.

Abt. für Dermatologie und Andrologie, Justus Liebig Universität, Giessen, Deutschland.

Abstract

More than a cosmetic nuisance, acne can produce anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that affect patients' lives in ways comparable to life-threatening or disabling diseases. Emotional problems due to the disease should be taken seriously and included in the treatment plan. A purely dermatological therapy by itself may not achieve its purpose. Even mild to moderate disease can be associated with significant depression and suicidal ideation, and psychologic change does not necessarily correlate with disease severity. Acne patients suffer particularly under social limitations and reduced quality of life. Psychological comorbidities in acne are probably greater than generally assumed. Attention should be paid to psychosomatic aspects especially if depressive-anxious disorders are suspected, particularly with evidence of suicidal tendencies, body dysmorphic disorders, or also in disrupted compliance. Therefore, patients who report particularly high emotional distress or dysmorphic tendencies due to the disease should be treated, if possible, by interdisciplinary therapy. The dermatologist should have some knowledge of the basics of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, which sometimes must be combined with systemic and topical treatment of acne in conjunction with basic psychosomatic treatment.

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That's an interesting abstract. Do you have a link to the full article, but I bet it requires a subscription to view. Darn. The medical parts in German would most likely be too difficult for me to translate for you anyway. :P

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That's an interesting abstract. Do you have a link to the full article, but I bet it requires a subscription to view. Darn. The medical parts in German would most likely be too difficult for me to translate for you anyway. :P

You speak German? Very cool. :cool: I do think you have to pay to access the article. I'll have to check the journal website and see. Sometimes they do translate them into English on the website, but not always.

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I semi- speak and semi-read German. It's been more than 20 years though since I've spoken it regularly!

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Good to see that the psychological issues of having acne are becoming more acknowledged in the medical literature. Wish this one wasn't in German - I'd love to read the whole article!!

J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2010 Mar;8 Suppl 1:S95-104.

[Acne vulgaris--psychosomatic aspects]

[Article in German]

Niemeier V, Kupfer J, Gieler U.

Abt. für Dermatologie und Andrologie, Justus Liebig Universität, Giessen, Deutschland.

Abstract

More than a cosmetic nuisance, acne can produce anxiety, depression, and other psychological problems that affect patients' lives in ways comparable to life-threatening or disabling diseases. Emotional problems due to the disease should be taken seriously and included in the treatment plan. A purely dermatological therapy by itself may not achieve its purpose. Even mild to moderate disease can be associated with significant depression and suicidal ideation, and psychologic change does not necessarily correlate with disease severity. Acne patients suffer particularly under social limitations and reduced quality of life. Psychological comorbidities in acne are probably greater than generally assumed. Attention should be paid to psychosomatic aspects especially if depressive-anxious disorders are suspected, particularly with evidence of suicidal tendencies, body dysmorphic disorders, or also in disrupted compliance. Therefore, patients who report particularly high emotional distress or dysmorphic tendencies due to the disease should be treated, if possible, by interdisciplinary therapy. The dermatologist should have some knowledge of the basics of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, which sometimes must be combined with systemic and topical treatment of acne in conjunction with basic psychosomatic treatment.

This is solid empirical proof that acne shouldn't be regarded as a trivial matter by those who haven't ever had it.. there's often alot of emotional suffering involved in the experience.

I guess this explains why for a considerable portion of longterm acne sufferers, the emotional scars caused by having acne don't automatically dissipate once the longterm goal of clear skin is achieved.. There's still so much healing to do in the process of rebuilding your social life and psyche..

Sorry if I went off a tangent. I need sleep lol.

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too bad no clear skinned person really cares about someone with acne. they arnt going to waste their time finding a cure for a disease that makes you considered less than human to others when they can work to find a cure for cancer and become a hero.

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too bad no clear skinned person really cares about someone with acne. they arnt going to waste their time finding a cure for a disease that makes you considered less than human to others when they can work to find a cure for cancer and become a hero.

Telling by that and by your name, I can see that the article is indeed right!

Edited by Alex_09
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I really don't think acne makes us less than human.

of course a sufferer would say that.

The only person who thinks you're less of a human is you.

We can make or break ourselves. Feel ostracized by people around you? Feel like no one wants to talk to you, or makes fun of you? It's because you're giving them hostile signals.

We are essentially animals; we read body language. Holding your head down, slumping your shoulders, scowling-they're all negative signals. They make you less approachable. They send off a signal that you don't want to be messed with and associated with.

Acne sucks. It kills confidence. I used to have severe acne, so I know. But you have to keep your head up and revive your confidence so that you can be happy and interact socially with others.

If you want to talk ever, feel free to PM me :]

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I really don't think acne makes us less than human.

of course a sufferer would say that.

I don't care what I am, doesn't make a difference. and I've never heard anyone say that. Ever. In real life, TV, magazine, whatever.

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Well put, Cellophiliac.

--

@"Of course a sufferer would say that."

Actually, a sufferer is more likely have the same thoughts as you. Bundled with cramped confidence is low self-worth. It comes naturally when a person has trouble looking in the mirror. Once you understand you're scrutinizing yourself too much, you'll realize you just have a health issue to address.

--

Psychological analysis is a good step. I'd like to see preventative medicine [for acne treatment] start to catch on as well.

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too bad no clear skinned person really cares about someone with acne. they arnt going to waste their time finding a cure for a disease that makes you considered less than human to others when they can work to find a cure for cancer and become a hero.

Ever think there's a dermatologist/researcher out there who used to have acne and experienced a great deal of distress from it so now they'd like to employ their time in finding better treatments for the condition that caused them a great deal of pain in their youth?

C'mon man, do you really think no one is looking to find better treatments for acne? Economics tells me otherwise; with millions upon millions of people suffering there's a huge demand for more effective acne treatments.

...and "less than human"? Seriously? Do you treat people differently if they have acne? I know I don't. Everyone has problems in their life. There isn't one person in the western world who is unfamiliar with acne. In fact, most people have suffered from it at one time or another. Just because an individual currently has clear skin doesn't mean that's always been the case. People understand and disregard the condition more than you realize.

Might be time to start considering an attitude adjustment. From your posts, you seem to be your own worst enemy.

Edited by BlowinIt
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too bad no clear skinned person really cares about someone with acne. they arnt going to waste their time finding a cure for a disease that makes you considered less than human to others when they can work to find a cure for cancer and become a hero.

Ever think there's a dermatologist/researcher out there who used to have acne and experienced a great deal of distress from it so now they'd like to employ their time in finding better treatments for the condition that caused them a great deal of pain in their youth?

C'mon man, do you really think no one is looking to find better treatments for acne? Economics tells me otherwise; with millions upon millions of people suffering there's a huge demand for more effective acne treatments.

...and "less than human"? Seriously? Do you treat people differently if they have acne? I know I don't. Everyone has problems in their life. There isn't one person in the western world who is unfamiliar with acne. In fact, most people have suffered from it at one time or another. Just because an individual currently has clear skin doesn't mean that's always been the case. People understand and disregard the condition more than you realize.

Might be time to start considering an attitude adjustment. From your posts, you seem to be your own worst enemy.

^^ Agreed.

I do truly hope Misery-pain-agony (i refuse to reiterate the last word) finds his/ her inner peace.

it's so Not healthy to be so bitter and angry at the world and worse yet in yourself.

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