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Bruin74

Alright guys. I got it. After 5 years, I've filled in an Ice-pick scar. Easy Method.

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Hey Guys,

I call this technique "bridging".

Theory(Hypothesis):

Scar tissue is in a constant state of renewal. There are cellular signals forcing the scar tissue to remain in a "trauma" state. Skin cells renew so fast, that maybe reprogramming of the cells never occurs, and you constantly maintain the scarred tissue state of the cells. However, cells adjacent to the scarred tissue has the cellular chemical memory of not being in a trauma state, not secreting high amounts of peptidoglycan ECM, and therefore the scarred tissue architecture is not being produced. Therefore, if we can somehow mix the cellular ingredients of healthy cells with that of damaged tissue, it should be possible to fix the scarred tissue.

Method:

Take a sharp object(be careful), could be a razor tip, a sharpened sterilized paper clip, anything.

Make 8 lines, imagining your scar is a "pie", cut the pie into eight equal pieces with the sharp object. Make sure to focus the intersecting point of all the lines directly on the ice pick scar. make sure you also cut beyond the edges of the ice pick scar, so that some of your healthy tissue is cut as well. blood will show. This is fine, just don't CUT TOO DEEP. you want very superficial cuts. Then dab the blood, wait for a scab to form. Don't disturb the scab. Let it form. In two days, watch as your scar is completely filled in. Repeat for more desired results if not completely filled in, i.e. spots you didn't cut might still be scarred tissue.

I tried this method on a 9 year old ice pick scar. 90% fill in. I'm going to continue this method, and hopefully post the pictures.

Be careful! but I promise you, this has worked for me!

bruin

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Hey Guys,

I call this technique "bridging".

Theory(Hypothesis):

Scar tissue is in a constant state of renewal. There are cellular signals forcing the scar tissue to remain in a "trauma" state. Skin cells renew so fast, that maybe reprogramming of the cells never occurs, and you constantly maintain the scarred tissue state of the cells. However, cells adjacent to the scarred tissue has the cellular chemical memory of not being in a trauma state, not secreting high amounts of peptidoglycan ECM, and therefore the scarred tissue architecture is not being produced. Therefore, if we can somehow mix the cellular ingredients of healthy cells with that of damaged tissue, it should be possible to fix the scarred tissue.

Method:

Take a sharp object(be careful), could be a razor tip, a sharpened sterilized paper clip, anything.

Make 8 lines, imagining your scar is a "pie", cut the pie into eight equal pieces with the sharp object. Make sure to focus the intersecting point of all the lines directly on the ice pick scar. make sure you also cut beyond the edges of the ice pick scar, so that some of your healthy tissue is cut as well. blood will show. This is fine, just don't CUT TOO DEEP. you want very superficial cuts. Then dab the blood, wait for a scab to form. Don't disturb the scab. Let it form. In two days, watch as your scar is completely filled in. Repeat for more desired results if not completely filled in, i.e. spots you didn't cut might still be scarred tissue.

I tried this method on a 9 year old ice pick scar. 90% fill in. I'm going to continue this method, and hopefully post the pictures.

Be careful! but I promise you, this has worked for me!

bruin

UR FREAKIN INSANE LOL. But if it wroks for you go for it. I wouldnt dare do this though.

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Hey Guys,

I call this technique "bridging".

Theory(Hypothesis):

Scar tissue is in a constant state of renewal. There are cellular signals forcing the scar tissue to remain in a "trauma" state. Skin cells renew so fast, that maybe reprogramming of the cells never occurs, and you constantly maintain the scarred tissue state of the cells. However, cells adjacent to the scarred tissue has the cellular chemical memory of not being in a trauma state, not secreting high amounts of peptidoglycan ECM, and therefore the scarred tissue architecture is not being produced. Therefore, if we can somehow mix the cellular ingredients of healthy cells with that of damaged tissue, it should be possible to fix the scarred tissue.

Method:

Take a sharp object(be careful), could be a razor tip, a sharpened sterilized paper clip, anything.

Make 8 lines, imagining your scar is a "pie", cut the pie into eight equal pieces with the sharp object. Make sure to focus the intersecting point of all the lines directly on the ice pick scar. make sure you also cut beyond the edges of the ice pick scar, so that some of your healthy tissue is cut as well. blood will show. This is fine, just don't CUT TOO DEEP. you want very superficial cuts. Then dab the blood, wait for a scab to form. Don't disturb the scab. Let it form. In two days, watch as your scar is completely filled in. Repeat for more desired results if not completely filled in, i.e. spots you didn't cut might still be scarred tissue.

I tried this method on a 9 year old ice pick scar. 90% fill in. I'm going to continue this method, and hopefully post the pictures.

Be careful! but I promise you, this has worked for me!

bruin

UR FREAKIN INSANE LOL. But if it wroks for you go for it. I wouldnt dare do this though.

i agree with help wanted, lol.

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Are you serious right now? :eh:

How did you even come up with that method? What made you slice your icepick scar into a pie? It took five years after that to fill in?

And how would you slice it into a pie like that, if icepick scars are usually tiny?

Sorry, this just sounds crazy. But I'm happy it worked for you :)

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Are you serious right now? :eh:

How did you even come up with that method? What made you slice your icepick scar into a pie? It took five years after that to fill in?

And how would you slice it into a pie like that, if icepick scars are usually tiny?

Sorry, this just sounds crazy. But I'm happy it worked for you :)

the filling in after causing damage to an ice pick scar is common. it usually starts instantly and lasts for a few weeks until the inflammation dies down again. it seems awefully similar to an extreme needling session. it would definitely help over time, though why dont you just needle them mate, its a lot less risky :)

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he is talking about regeneration of skin through damage.

Many scar revision techniques are based on this very method...however I don't think this is safe to do for someone to self administer...just like how dermarolling is kind of an iffy area for me...but that is a personal stance.

Techniques liek subcision (cutting underneath to untether scar tissue) and dermabrasion-->shaving the skin down, cause damage to skin and then the skin/collagen reforms.

This however is saying you cut across your scar in 8 lines and create a wound and somehow it magically fills in. I am not sure if it works that way.

If this does work I suggest you start posting pictures before and after and during to back your findings becuase you may have just found a technique that can take down a multi-billion dollar industry.

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Im sure the improvement you see is due to swelling. You may be surprised to find out over time this will subside and the scar will look depper and more severe. I tried something like this on a rolling scar and worsened it.

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Basically,

All the methods out there, needling, dermaroller, TCA Cross, Fraxel, all are based on the fact that you need some sort of ablation. CO2 laser is just focused heat, you're either ablating the scar tissue completely, the cells that secrete the scar tissue matrix, or you're simply inducing some sort of healing response at the sight of injury. Needling, didn't work for me, it simply made the scars deeper. Dermaroller didn't work, because it didn't really damage the scar tissue that much, it was more like poking at the tissue, just irritating the skin. TCA Cross is along the same lines as what I'm talking about, except it's hard to control the chemical's penetration into the skin. Fraxel is too expensive, but seems to work. Stem cell therapy probably won't work, because the problem is the scar tissue, not cells not knowing they need to repair themselves.

It's not inflammation. The scar is only filled in where I damaged the skin. I'm not talking about slicing and dicing your skin. I'm talking about very focalized cuts to to 1. break up the scar tissue. 2. injure some surrounding healthy tissue, to hopefully which appears to be working, sending messages to the scar tissue area to grow back in like healthy tissue. I know "cuts" sounds extreme, but it's not slicing and dicing. Pick an ice-pick scar, try it, see for yourself.

Bruin

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Bruin,

thanks for sharing, but I'm still a little confused. Exactly how long ago did you try this method? so cuts as opposed to needle punctures is what worked for you?

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Bruin,

thanks for sharing, but I'm still a little confused. Exactly how long ago did you try this method? so cuts as opposed to needle punctures is what worked for you?

hmm ok, if we are going to turn this into a serious thread, where people can try the method and not cause disfiguring scarring, we need to be logical:

yes cutting the scar would do a lot more than puncturing it, as its breaking more of the ribbons holding it down and creating a lot more damage

you wont get the scar filling in completely. i really believe he is experiencing inflammation from the damage he has created. once it goes down, the scar should reappear.

instead of cutting them, i recommend people use the following tool (if you insist on using the method). its punches the scar out, though cuts around the sides of the scar. it works much like the knife only safer. i remember seeing them available on ebay many donks ago

http://www.minarsdermatology.com/medical/e...ch_excision.jpg

its effectively a punch excision/elevation.

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I agree with you monkey, that's why I was curious to know how long ago Bruin had done this. He could be overly excited about haphazard results.

i remembered the first time i needled and saw the scars fill in and then applied topical iodine to help them heal. i remember thinking how amazing it was and i did exactly the same as this guy - posted enthusiastically for days and revved everyone up. the scars returned to their original size a short time later and i was left looking pretty silly.

lol i think we all go through phases like this. i dont know what is more upsetting - thinking youve found a cure when you havent, or the humiliation of everyone getting excited and then finding it too doesnt work.

either way, this is a bit sad isnt it..if only it worked !

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It does make sense. I might give it a try on a small scar lol. But i just dont know, shall i let the scab form and leave it as much as possible? or cover it with a plaster and keep it moist. I remember long time back i made a HUGE scar on my face by picking my skin, it was so bad and deep, and because i felt so uncomfortable with it, i covered it with a plaster to hide what happened ! and after maybe 2 weeks it healed but with a discoloration, and after maybe 2 months the normal color returned and no sign for it at all. Any now sometimes with a small pimple and without touching it, it leaves a scar !

so i thought maybe keeping it moist and the plaster as much as possible might be the reason. Anyone? what do u think?

Edited by *unknown*
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I remember a very long time ago I read about someone who had undergone a little known procedure called 'derma-planing', (I think it was,) in which they basically had their face (sort of) sliced up as opposed to having it abraded via a procedure like dermabrasion. I may have read about it on these boards; it was so long ago I really can't remember. Anyway, the outcome for that person was spectacular, apparently, and reading about the OP's experiment reminded me of that.

I wish I could remember where I read about derma-planing; I'm pretty sure I've only ever heard of it the once.

Anyway, this might be worth trying in a remote location. Eg. I have a scar on the palm of my hand I've had for many years. Maybe I'll give it a go there before I attack my face with a razor blade! #saw

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I think whoever does this should carefully document and picture what is going on to see if there are actually any positive results.

I understand the premise but still think it could be a bit risky. I guess we shall see what happens though.. Good luck, take pictures and let's see if you guys manage to improve it.

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Guest Timehealsall

lmao would this work on scarred nose pores or ice pick scars on nose?

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