Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
synthol

Does a hot, humid environment really make your skin oilier?

Recommended Posts

I don't know iff it increases oil output, but it definitely makes my skin feel greasier

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me, it doesn't make a difference, i actually love hot weather, summer especially but days which are warmer i can get throughout the day much easier and i require less showers.

I don't notice the oil on my skin as much, and i feel much more happier.

But if it makes you feel much more queasy and horrible, then showering is an answer but not a permanent solution.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A complete guess here but I feel that it just makes your skin feel oilier or more moist. Afterall, humidity describes the amount of moisture in the air, right?

I know in winter, with the cold, dry air, that my skin becomes oilier faster because it becomes dry and counteracts by producing more oil.

This is a tricky question....my skin definitely feels dirtier faster in humid weather than in dry

Edited by NessaVéneanár
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heat decreases sebum's viscosity (thickness), making it thinner, and making it feel like there's more of it. (Think of heating oil in a frying pan - as you heat it it gets thinner and spreads out) The fact that it's less viscous may also mean that the oil can travel more quickly to your face, making it feel greasier faster.

Cold weather does just the opposite - viscosity increases, oil is thicker, moves slower, so your skin doesn't seem as greasy.

Doesn't affect how much or how fast the oil is being pumped out by the sebaceous glands, but can affect how easily it travels to the surface and how it feels once it's there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My initial thought was that humidity wouldn't have an effect on sebum production but evidently it does:

Introduction

The phrase 'skin pore' usually applies to the visible topographic features at the skin surface corresponding to enlarged openings of pilosebaceous follicles.[1,2] They appear as empty funnel-shaped structures or as cornified cylindrical plugs corresponding to comedones. Visible empty funnel-shaped pores are physiologically present in all individuals. Horny impacted pores are normally seen in the facial skin, especially on the nose and cheeks, but the appearance of pores differs among individuals. Many exogenous and endogenous factors such as sex, genetic predisposition, ageing, chronic ultraviolet light exposure, comedogenic xenobiotics, acne and seborrhoea are known to be responsible for enlarged pores.[3] Oily skin results from large quantities of sebum produced by the sebaceous glands, filling the follicular reservoir and leaking onto the body surface. On the face, greasy skin is shiny and may be accompanied by large pores, follicular plugs, sebaceous filaments and comedones. Various factors are known to influence sebum secretion and there is a consensus that sebum secretion rate declines with age.[4] It has been determined that after reaching maximum rates at around 20 years of age, sebum secretion steadily declines, in both men and women, over the entire succeeding life span. Generally there is no clear evidence that men produce larger amounts of sebum although men tend to have higher values.[5] Hormonal factors also contribute to the difference in sebum secretion. Androgen exerts a major effect on sebocyte proliferation and sebum secretion[6,7] and the level of receptors for 5α-reductase type 1 is significantly higher in sebaceous glands than in other skin structures.[8,9] Oestrogen counteracts the effect of androgen but with a much weaker potency. Environmental factors such as season, relative humidity and temperature are also known to influence sebum secretion.[10]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this true or just a myth?

Kligman and Shelley pointed out in a study more than 50 years ago that extra moisture on the skin can greatly enhance the appearance or perception of sebum. They said that a little moisture + a little oil can look oilier than no moisture + more oil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know in winter, with the cold, dry air, that my skin becomes oilier faster because it becomes dry and counteracts by producing more oil.

Oh dear....people keep saying things like that, but I don't know of any scientific evidence at all that your skin "counteracts" to any external factor by producing more oil. More specifically, there's at least one study showing no correlation at all between skin moisture levels and sebum production, so why would anybody's skin try to "counteract" to dryness by making more sebum? Don't you think skin would be smarter than that? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My initial thought was that humidity wouldn't have an effect on sebum production but evidently it does:

...Environmental factors such as season, relative humidity and temperature are also known to influence sebum secretion.[10]

So, from one quickly researched source, oil and humidity are related directly.

Oil and humidity are not related directly, except in the very loose sense I mentioned in a previous post in this thread: Kligman & Shelley found that moisture can greatly enhance the appearance of sebum on the skin, without affecting the actual quantity of sebum on the skin.

The statement above from Medscape was rather poorly written and ambiguous. Their reference (10) above refers to the following study by Piérard-Franchimont, Piérard, and Kligman: "Seasonal Modulation of Sebum Excretion", Dermatologica 1990;181:21-22. Their entire Discussion section in that study consists of one paragraph:

"When the environmental conditions are kept constant, we had previously shown that the overall sebum excretion rate of men was rather stable with time [2]. Our present data are in accordance with Cunliffe et al. [1]. There is at least a 10% increase in the sebum excretion rate per degree celsius. Such variation does not depend upon an increased number of active sebaceous follicles, but rather results from an increased delivery of sebum to the surface of the skin."

In other words, humidity doesn't really have anything to do with it, it's the temperature which can affect how much sebum gets delivered to the surface (again, poor wording on the part of Medscape).

The reference that Kligman et al make in that paragraph above is to this study by Cunliffe, Burton, and Shuster: "The Effect of Local Temperature Variations on the Sebum Excretion Rate", Br J Derm (1970) 83, 650. And here is a paragraph from Cunliffe's Discussion section:

"The sebaceous gland is holocrine, with a turnover rate of the order of 7 days, and the changes we observed within 90 min. of altering the local temperature are unlikely to be due to changes in sebum secretion in the gland itself. There are 2 ways in which local temperature changes could influence excretion at a superficial level. Firstly there may be alterations in the flow of sebum to the surface, since sebum viscosity is known to vary with temperature. The second possibility is that the effect of temperature is an artefactual consequence of the method of sebum collection. [...] This suggests that the rate of absorption by the [collection] paper may be influenced by temperature independently of changes in secretion or excretion..."

So as you can see from these excerpts from the cited studies, Kligman et al and Cunliffe et al were clearly referring to the effect of temperature variations in the delivery of sebum to the surface of the skin. It definitely has nothing to do with humidity! :)

Edited by bryan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My initial thought was that humidity wouldn't have an effect on sebum production but evidently it does:

...Environmental factors such as season, relative humidity and temperature are also known to influence sebum secretion.[10]

So, from one quickly researched source, oil and humidity are related directly.

Oil and humidity are not related directly, except in the very loose sense I mentioned in a previous post in this thread: Kligman & Shelley found that moisture can greatly enhance the appearance of sebum on the skin, without affecting the actual quantity of sebum on the skin.

The statement above from Medscape was rather poorly written and ambiguous. Their reference (10) above refers to the following study by Piérard-Franchimont, Piérard, and Kligman: "Seasonal Modulation of Sebum Excretion", Dermatologica 1990;181:21-22. Their entire Discussion section in that study consists of one paragraph:

"When the environmental conditions are kept constant, we had previously shown that the overall sebum excretion rate of men was rather stable with time [2]. Our present data are in accordance with Cunliffe et al. [1]. There is at least a 10% increase in the sebum excretion rate per degree celsius. Such variation does not depend upon an increased number of active sebaceous follicles, but rather results from an increased delivery of sebum to the surface of the skin."

In other words, humidity doesn't really have anything to do with it, it's the temperature which can affect how much sebum gets delivered to the surface (again, poor wording on the part of Medscape).

The reference that Kligman et al make in that paragraph above is to this study by Cunliffe, Burton, and Shuster: "The Effect of Local Temperature Variations on the Sebum Excretion Rate", Br J Derm (1970) 83, 650. And here is a paragraph from Cunliffe's Discussion section:

"The sebaceous gland is holocrine, with a turnover rate of the order of 7 days, and the changes we observed within 90 min. of altering the local temperature are unlikely to be due to changes in sebum secretion in the gland itself. There are 2 ways in which local temperature changes could influence excretion at a superficial level. Firstly there may be alterations in the flow of sebum to the surface, since sebum viscosity is known to vary with temperature. The second possibility is that the effect of temperature is an artefactual consequence of the method of sebum collection. [...] This suggests that the rate of absorption by the [collection] paper may be influenced by temperature independently of changes in secretion or excretion..."

So as you can see from these excerpts from the cited studies, Kligman et al and Cunliffe et al were clearly referring to the effect of temperature variations in the delivery of sebum to the surface of the skin. It definitely has nothing to do with humidity! :)

So, pretty much what I said, eh? (heat makes oil thinner, makes it get to the surface easier and makes it spread quicker)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My initial thought was that humidity wouldn't have an effect on sebum production but evidently it does:

...Environmental factors such as season, relative humidity and temperature are also known to influence sebum secretion.[10]

So, from one quickly researched source, oil and humidity are related directly.

Oil and humidity are not related directly, except in the very loose sense I mentioned in a previous post in this thread: Kligman & Shelley found that moisture can greatly enhance the appearance of sebum on the skin, without affecting the actual quantity of sebum on the skin.

The statement above from Medscape was rather poorly written and ambiguous. Their reference (10) above refers to the following study by Piérard-Franchimont, Piérard, and Kligman: "Seasonal Modulation of Sebum Excretion", Dermatologica 1990;181:21-22. Their entire Discussion section in that study consists of one paragraph:

"When the environmental conditions are kept constant, we had previously shown that the overall sebum excretion rate of men was rather stable with time [2]. Our present data are in accordance with Cunliffe et al. [1]. There is at least a 10% increase in the sebum excretion rate per degree celsius. Such variation does not depend upon an increased number of active sebaceous follicles, but rather results from an increased delivery of sebum to the surface of the skin."

In other words, humidity doesn't really have anything to do with it, it's the temperature which can affect how much sebum gets delivered to the surface (again, poor wording on the part of Medscape).

The reference that Kligman et al make in that paragraph above is to this study by Cunliffe, Burton, and Shuster: "The Effect of Local Temperature Variations on the Sebum Excretion Rate", Br J Derm (1970) 83, 650. And here is a paragraph from Cunliffe's Discussion section:

"The sebaceous gland is holocrine, with a turnover rate of the order of 7 days, and the changes we observed within 90 min. of altering the local temperature are unlikely to be due to changes in sebum secretion in the gland itself. There are 2 ways in which local temperature changes could influence excretion at a superficial level. Firstly there may be alterations in the flow of sebum to the surface, since sebum viscosity is known to vary with temperature. The second possibility is that the effect of temperature is an artefactual consequence of the method of sebum collection. [...] This suggests that the rate of absorption by the [collection] paper may be influenced by temperature independently of changes in secretion or excretion..."

So as you can see from these excerpts from the cited studies, Kligman et al and Cunliffe et al were clearly referring to the effect of temperature variations in the delivery of sebum to the surface of the skin. It definitely has nothing to do with humidity! :)

bryan bryan bryan

tell me how one can change temperature without altering humidity :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, pretty much what I said, eh? (heat makes oil thinner, makes it get to the surface easier and makes it spread quicker)

Yes.

By the way, headtrip_honey, I really really like your new photo! I liked the old one, too, but this new one is terrific!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×