Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I've gone to one three times now, and he says that he thinks accutane can help me a lot, but my insurance will not cover it, so it'd be in upwards of 1000 dollars a month. Obviously, that isn't doable. I have gotten steroid shots to cysts before, and it helped an incredible amount, but I'm not able to get a shot for all of my cysts.

I hear everyone talking about how much Accutane or some other drug did for them, and they say that other people should try it. I would love to, but I can't.

Has anyone else been in this situation? What did you do?

I just want some sort of guidance. I'm a 15 year old guy. I've got moderately severe cystalic acne, and sometimes I feel ashamed enough of my skin to use cover-up.

This just bothers me so much, and I can't stand it. My hyper-pigmentation doesn't seem to ever fade, and I just keep developing more and more blemishes and cysts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

i can't afford it either otherwise i would try a low does....but if you can't afford it keep trying the diet excise vitamins and some type of acne medicine {i found the best stuff to be neutrogena rapid clear} and if you can save whatever you can to pay for it later on....i would save if i could but i have rent, bills, and a car payment and i have to eat still and i cant afford all that on minimum wage....

Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, I have some real beef with dermatologists. My dermatologist, to get more business, had me try every other product before finally prescribing me something that actually works. He also even suggested I try accutane. Do you know the type of mark-up they get for accutane? Accutane is just money in their pocket.

A little off topic, but replying to your financial situation -Have you considered sodium sulfacetamide (just read the reviews on here); its retail value is about $80 and lasts about 2-3 months. If that's too much money, try urine. (No really it does work...but as soon as you stop using it, your face breaks out again). Vitamin e is also very helpful for acne scars (again, as soon as you stop using it, it all comes back).

However, you definitely shouldn't feel ashamed to use cover-up. If you use it correctly, no one would even know...just don't go around bragging about it. You'd be surprised to find out the number of guys who use cover-up.

Don't feel bad about not being able to use accutane. First, you have no way of knowing if one treatment would even be enough. (Some people actually have to use it twice!) Second, it just could do some serious damage. There are cheaper alternatives that work! And if cover-up works, then it's all the same.

Edited by rutgers7
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently prescribed Retin-A, Duac Gel, and Doxy. I've been on each for about a year, and have seen little to no improvement. I think I'm going to try and come up with a more affordable, personally designed regimen. Hopefully, it'll work. If it doesn't, at least I tried.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And how many times have you seen your dermatologist during this time? Man, sounds like he/she is really bad. After three-six months of little improvement, they should have definitely offered you another type of antibiotic. I was on doxy and it did not work for me at all.

Definitely consider sodium sulfacetamide. Seriously, it's the last thing that many dermatologists prescribe....because....it actually ends up working. If they give it to you first, they don't get as much money from you or your insurance. They'll also try to convince you to go onto accutane before they'll prescribe this to you.

Of course, I'm making a stereotype from only seeing three different dermatologists. I did an experiment cause my insurance is good. All three dermatologists, like clockwork, told me try accutane. I rejected accutane. Then, they said, let's try putting you on sodium sulfacetamide since nothing else seems to be working. Sure enough, sodium sulfacetamide works...but there's no adverse side effects for them to wait this long. (I've been seeing dermatologists for the past 5 years.)

Try your regimen. At least no one is trying to sell you a product. But definitely read the reviews on sodium sulfacetamide and consider trying it.

Edited by rutgers7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for going off topic Mr OP but Rutgers, does it have to be "sodium sulfacetamide" or do you think any product with sulfur can help alot? I've tried tons of products but I don't think anyone of them were sulfur based..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not tried this, as I don't live in the US and hence have nationalised healthcare, but have you considered buying Accutane on the Internet from generic brand manufacturers, which can be hundreds of dollars cheaper than the brand name product from Roche?

I have read of a few people on Acne.org/Acne Blogs/Acne Sites who live in the US doing exactly that, with no prescriptions or referrals from dermos and paying as little as $80 for a box of 60, 20mg pills.

All they do is self-medicate, and stick to a regular dosage.

You don't need a PhD Dermatologist to calculate your required daily dosage (i.e. 20mg, 40mg, 60mg, 80mg).

Take your bodyweight in kilograms (convert from pounds) and multiply it by 0.5mg.

E.g. If you weight 80kg or 173lb, then you multiply 80 by 0.5 and you get 40. Hence your required dosage is 40mg per day (which is usually administered as three, 20mg capsules, taken at the start & end of a day).

In Australia, Accutane (or Roaccutane by it's original name) costs $7.95 a box for me.

I feel incredibly disheartened to know people in the US have to suffer with severe cystic acne when such a cheap and viable treatment is available, but is prohibitively expensive simply due to ridiculous American mark-up costs and health insurance denials.

Edited by Mirza89
Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't feel bad about not being able to use accutane. First, you have no way of knowing if one treatment would even be enough. (Some people actually have to use it twice!) Second, it just could do some serious damage.

Oh my god...

20% of those prescribed Accutane have a re-lapse and need a second course.

No offence but you're talking out of your a**. Pardon the French.

A 1 in 5 guaranteed cure for severe, cystic Acne is a miracle drug. End of story.

I should know, because I experienced that very transformation.

3 separate dermatologists I have spoken to, who've medicated hundreds upon hundreds of acne sufferers have said they have yet to see a case where a person suffered permanent liver damage, severe depression (which is what almost all cystic acne sufferers have to begin with), raised blood sugar, ulcers or any of the ridiculous, "nightmare" side-effects supposedly associated with Accutane.

The Accutane horror stories floating around are pure bullsh*t.

Doxycycline and Antibiotics have the same potential side-effects too. They weaken your immune system by building up a dependence on synthetic antibodies within your blood stream to fight infection (rather than your body's own) and also build up a resistance to antibiotics, so should you ever suffer a severe infection of some kind and need to be prescribed strong antibiotics, they may not react as well as they should to the infection.

A drug manufacturer when conducting live trials of a drug to be approved by the FDA or some other Regulatory body has to list EVERY single side-effect that has been reporting in live trials, on the packaging and instruction leaflets, regardless of how often they have actually occurred.

That is required by law in most jurisdictions, due to the impossibility of testing for every single possible demographic that may take the drug.

Hence, if just one person had Irritable Bowel Syndrome while taking Accutane out of 1,000 sample patients, then that side-effect must be listed, despite the fact it's occurrence was 1 in 1,000.

Don't believe any stupid Accutane misinformation people spread on this site.

Edited by Mirza89
Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry for going off topic Mr OP but Rutgers, does it have to be "sodium sulfacetamide" or do you think any product with sulfur can help alot? I've tried tons of products but I don't think anyone of them were sulfur based..

I'm not sure. Sodium sulfacetamide was the first sulfur wash I ever tried. If you read up about the history of acne, apparently ancient Romans used to use sulfur too for acne.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20% of those prescribed Accutane have a re-lapse and need a second course.

I'm confused as to why you went off on a rant....you just made my point with this statement.

In case if you missed the first post, ItsCrockett said he would have to pay close to $1000 a month (6 months = $6000). I was trying to assure him it was "no big deal" that he couldn't go on accutane. One reason for that statement was the fact that it might not even work for him. A 20% failure rate is PRETTY high...and most people don't have that risk tolerance (when $6000 is at stake).

You also fail to address the percentage of people who have to stop using accutane due to its side effects. In the states, accutane is heavily regulated. Dermatologists have to take you off it if they notice any warning signs. The liability is just too high for them if something was to go wrong. Therefore, there is also a realistic chance that ItsCrockett might not even get to finish his first course.

3 separate dermatologists I have spoken to, who've medicated hundreds upon hundreds of acne sufferers have said they have yet to see a case where a person suffered permanent liver damage, severe depression (which is what almost all cystic acne sufferers have to begin with), raised blood sugar, ulcers or any of the ridiculous, "nightmare" side-effects supposedly associated with Accutane.

I guess you haven't taken Marketing 101, huh? Dermatologists are trying to SELL you a product...and with accutane, they get a really high mark-up from it. It is within their own financial interests to try to convince you that accutane is your last resort. (For five years, I was not prescribed a sulfur wash. After I turned down accutane, the dermatologists finally prescribed me a sulfur wash that works. Coincidence? All I can think about is all the money that they got making me come to them for five years. Oh well, even they have to eat.)

You also need to be skeptical about the things you hear. Do you know what the legal definition of perjury is? Maybe the definition is different in Australia, but in the states, you're not committing perjury even if you are knowingly withholding information.

For example, I also spoke with 3 separate dermatologists about accutane. (My insurance is good so I figured, why not.) They actually told me the SAME thing as yours did that none of their patients had any "severe" side-effects. However, you would be a fool to take this statement at face value.

I then asked those same dermatologists if any of their patients had to stop taking accutane. They all told me that they had a handful who did.

Why would a doctor take a patient off of accutane? Well, for starters, if their bloodwork is coming back bad, then they have to. Hence, they prevent any permanent damage from occurring. (At least in the states, it's heavily regulated and there are clear lines on what's acceptable and isn't.)

Still, what would you consider "permanent" to mean? Would you say, something that is still with you for 10 years...or 20 years? How many doctors do you think follow their patients 10-20 years down the road? (Unless if it's a long-term clinical study, the answer to that is NONE.) Therefore, a doctor can honestly say that none of their patients had any permanent damage....because they just don't know...hence, they are not lying. Do you think a doctor would say, "Statistically speaking, some of my patients probably have permanent damage?"

You know what they say, ignorance is bliss. But, come on, you need to educate yourself just a little.

The Accutane horror stories floating around are pure bullsh*t.

Sigh. This is just wrong. Actually, it's funny. You end up contracting yourself later in the same post. We'll get to that.

Doxycycline and Antibiotics have the same potential side-effects too.

Yes, that is technically true. However, the chances that antibiotics result in those same side-effects are next to nothing....much lower than accutane.

Hence, if just one person had Irritable Bowel Syndrome while taking Accutane out of 1,000 sample patients, then that side-effect must be listed, despite the fact it's occurrence was 1 in 1,000.

And, this, my friend, would be a contradiction. Irritable Bowel Syndrome sure sounds like a horror story to me...(but maybe that's just me).

You have completely missed my point during your rant. I wanted to assure ItsCrockett that it was no big deal he couldn't go on accutane. In fact, HONEST dermatologists will agree with that statement.

Instead, your post should have be along these lines, "From my own personal experience, I would highly recommend that you risk the $6000 and try accutane. However, there is a 20% chance you may need a second treatment. There is a small chance you might be forced to stop treatment, and an even smaller chance you will have a serious side reaction."

Seriously, your post did not address the topic at issue here. Instead, you just attack my advice. You did not offer ItsCrockett any sound advice considering his circumstances. You just go off on a rant. It was highly uncalled for.

Edited by rutgers7
Link to post
Share on other sites
A 20% failure rate is PRETTY high...and most people don't have that risk tolerance (when $6000 is at stake).

As opposed to a what, 75% percent failure rate for any of the tetracycline antibiotics, which are not designed to treat cystic acne?

Great trade-off.

As for your gloating recommendations of Sodium Sulfacetamide, you do realize there have been numerous cases of actual deaths arising from severe allergic reactions to the topical application?

Superficial, topical applications which do not target the production of acne bacteria & sebum are utterly useless for anything other than very mild acne and of course stop working the moment you're off them.

Not to mention they almost always cause some form of visible skin irritation.

The OP reported he has Cystic Acne. Hence Sodium Sulfacetamide would be at best temporarily helpful or at worst, useless.

All you're giving him is false hope & empty promises.

I'm not even going to touch your recommendation of "urine" :lol:

In the states, accutane is heavily regulated.

That has absolutely nothing to do with the potency of the drug but more to do with licensing issues and your general healthcare system being privatised and therefore profit driven.

Roche, the original manufacturer, does not licence the production or distribution of Roaccutane in the United States.

Hence, since it cannot be imported directly is has to be made by generic drug manufacturers (such as Barr or Mylar) who don't have the economies of scale like a massive corporation such as Roche do, to manufacturer the drug for a real profit without jacking up the selling price significantly.

Due to this fact as well, there is no oversight/quality control/assurance from the original manufacturer, Roche, hence the FDA has to put far more scrutiny on Accutane since it being made & distributed via third parties who have no affiliation or links to the original manufacturer.

The liability is just too high for them if something was to go wrong.

You're talking about it as if it's goddamn brain surgery. Millions of people are prescribed the drug annually, find me ONE case of somebody developing any life-threatening or debilitating condition as a consequence of using Accutane. I'll be waiting...

I guess you haven't taken Marketing 101, huh? Dermatologists are trying to SELL you a product...and with accutane, they get a really high mark-up from it. It is within their own financial interests to try to convince you that accutane is your last resort.

You're argument would be true IF, I lived in the United States.

Welcome to the wonders of Nationalised Healthcare. A dermatologist (or physician of any kind really), in Australia receives no mark-up revenue from the sale of the drug (or any drug for that matter) since it's subsidised buy the Government, hence costs only $7.95 here.

Australian Dermatologists make profits on non-obligatory, consultation fees and auxiliary/speciality therapy services not covered by Medicare (i.e. untested/unproven things such as UV light therapy) not on the sale of prescribed drugs.

Australia's healthcare industry is NOT profit-driven and privately-owned by greedy, ivory-tower dwelling, capitalists.

Don't talk to me about contradictions.

You also need to be skeptical about the things you hear. Do you know what the legal definition of perjury is? Maybe the definition is different in Australia, but in the states, you're not committing perjury even if you are knowingly withholding information.

Marketing 101? How about you open a friggin' Atlas?

Australia's judicial system is probably 10 times as robust as America's, and as I mentioned above, there is no tangible or beneficial reason for a dermatologist here to withhold information about a patient's condition because they do not make profit from the sale of a drug or treatment.

I then asked those same dermatologists if any of their patients had to stop taking accutane. They all told me that they had a handful who did.

Wow.

A handful, out of how many exactly? Probably over a thousand at the least in all their years of practice.

And this is the basis of your argument? Unspecified generalisations based on information which YOU don't know.

Clever.

Why would a doctor take a patient off of accutane? Well, for starters, if their bloodwork is coming back bad, then they have to. Hence, they prevent any permanent damage from occurring. (At least in the states, it's heavily regulated and there are clear lines on what's acceptable and isn't.)

:lol: You really have some superiority complex going don't you? You think America is the only nation in the world with indoor plumbing don't you? The rest of the world are all using witchdoctors and herbal treatments passed down from the ages to treat ourselves...

I had 3 blood tests while on my course of Roaccutane here. The standard procedure is, if there is no discernible trend in degraded liver performance or increased glucose/lipid levels in the blood, over a period of 2 months then you're good to go.

The third test is just pro-forma at the end of your treatment to ensure you're health has stayed more or less consistent.

And yes there are also pre-defined levels in Australia, as to what constitutes "liver damage" and "increased blood glucose levels".

Some variation from the norm is acceptable.

How many doctors do you think follow their patients 10-20 years down the road? (Unless if it's a long-term clinical study, the answer to that is NONE.) Therefore, a doctor can honestly say that none of their patients had any permanent damage....because they just don't know...hence, they are not lying.

Sigh.

That could apply to ANY commercial drug.

Tell me, has there been a long-term, 20 plus year study on the prolonged usage of Sodium Sulfacetamide? NO.

Roaccutane (or Isotretinoin) in it's chemical form has existed since the 1920's and was immediately recognised for it's ability to cure common skin disorders.

It's been in regular usage for 70 years more or less, I think the international body of dermatological organizations would have caught onto any serious, sustained, long-term conditions arising from it's usage.

Yes, that is technically true. However, the chances that antibiotics result in those same side-effects are next to nothing....much lower than accutane.

Tetracycline antibiotics also attack living, healthy cells & tissue like any antibiotics. And in that vein, become utterly useless against the bacteria they are designed to eradicate once it develops an immunity.

There are numerous links between Tetracycline and reduced kidney function (or other renal-related problems), gastrointestinal degradation and lupus.

Read these:

http://archsurg.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/summary/76/5/762

http://www.roadback.org/index.cfm?fuseacti...;display_id=116

http://www.drugs.com/sfx/tetracycline-side-effects.html

http://www.ehow.com/facts_4813505_tetracyc...de-effects.html

And, this, my friend, would be a contradiction. Irritable Bowel Syndrome sure sounds like a horror story to me...(but maybe that's just me).

Really?

An extremely common affliction which affects 15% of the American population (46,050,982 Americans), 10% of the British population (9,212,109 Britons) and is as frequent as 45% in countries like Mexico, you call a "horror story"?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0..._prevalence.jpg

Not to mention highly treatable with over-the-counter laxatives & dietary fibre.

What a joke.

You have completely missed my point during your rant. I wanted to assure ItsCrockett that it was no big deal he couldn't go on accutane. In fact, HONEST dermatologists will agree with that statement.

THE only proven treatment for Cystic Acne is high does of Isotretinoin. The only proven treatment.

And you can look up 1,000 honest clinical studies to your heart's content, I'm not going to spend my time arguing over such a widely-known fact.

"From my own personal experience, I would highly recommend that you risk the $6000 and try accutane. However, there is a 20% chance you may need a second treatment. There is a small chance you might be forced to stop treatment, and an even smaller chance you will have a serious side reaction."

I have paid a total of $440 dollars for my entire Accutane course, including dermatologist appointments.

That comes to somewhere in the region of 397 US Dollars.

I didn't need a second treatment, I didn't stop the treatment ever and I had virtually no side-effects I could discern apart from dry lips and dry eyes.

Oh the "horror".

I'd have no reason to attack your "advice" if it wasn't fuelled by pure, urban-legend misconceptions and fear & doubt spread by selective, personal interests at hand by people who have no understanding of the biological & anatomical factors causing Cystic Acne.

Edited by Mirza89
Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, touche. Good post. Good post, indeed. I found it to be very well-written, informative, and at the same time, entertaining. Of course, there are a few trivial points I disagree with (like you taking things out of context), but I don't see any pressing reason to address them.

But, alas, poor ItsCrockett won't be able to afford accutane. Only if we followed suit of Australia...America might be a better place.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought this article was interesting...

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=206...id=a7Oj2q25ZHZ8

Andrew McCarrell had 5 surgeries and his colon removed. He was awarded $25 million in compensatory damages.

"The verdict today was the largest of six for Accutane users who won awards totaling $56 million. Roche lost every case, although a Florida appeals court overturned one of those judgments for $7.2 million."

Link to post
Share on other sites

$1000 a month!!!!????????

That's insane! How cruel that must feel, to be within arms reach of a solution. Perhaps you could steal some or become a prostitute?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel a lot better about this now. I'm trying to come up with some sort of system that works well for me, and so far, I'm having some early results. But, thanks to everyone, for coming and commenting and arguing and supporting/ I came back to this just now, and it went from 2 replies to 16. :D

And yea, mark-ups are completely ludicrous. One thing that my dermo has done that's worked really well, is injecting any major cysts with weak steroids, and that wasn't expensive at all, only $20 a shot. But, (fortunately) not all my acne is cystic, so it doesn't help everything.

Edited by ItsCrockett
Link to post
Share on other sites
$1000 a month!!!!????????

That's insane! How cruel that must feel, to be within arms reach of a solution. Perhaps you could steal some or become a prostitute?

Very practical solutions. That could actually work haha.

Haha.. Rutgers7, I originally thought your post began with "Oh, douche"...until I re-read it.

LOL!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×