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Mr President

melanin increasing tablets

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hey all, im naturally pretty pale. ive got blond hair and blue eyes. ive recently been considering some all natural menalin increasing tablets.

my main reasons are it might make me look a bit healthier and also reduce the risk of getting skin cancer, like my grandad. i dont get out in the sun heaps and dont plan to, though living in a country like australia you can never be too careful. i dont react too well to sun creams and fake tans e.g. it just gives me more pimples, cause my skin is naturally very oilly or i look even whiter.

im curious whether my scars will get darker as my skin naturally does. or will they stay the same colour they are now. if they stay the same, they might stand out. what are your views?

Edited by cartwheeling_monkey

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melanin tablets really makes your skin tan?

If you tan your skin, your scars will tan as well. It is after all, still a part of your skin.

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Hey cartwheel are you sure these tablets really exist? If this really exists it would be a good treatment for vitilligo patients, yet i've never heard of this before.

I personally don't think you should tamper with your pigment.

Can you provide a name for these tablets, I'm curious to find out what these are.

I have a feeling its something herbel?

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Hey carwheel. I don't know if you guys watched this episode of oprah. But a few years ago oprah had this black guy on the show. This guy took some pills to make his skin completely white. Then he went undercover as a white guy to see how people would treat him, compared to being a black guy. Anyways, then he turned back to black.

What freaking pills is this? I never was able to find what pills this guy supposedly took to turn white.

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thanks for all the responses guys. they are called tanamins and they look like they have been around for a while.

they contain high levels of L-Tyrosine, which helps the body produce more pigment. what it means is the skin will produce more pigment than it originally would when you go in the sun. more pigment means less damage to the skin. so nothing as major as waking up and being a completely different colour, just adding to the melanin I already have.

they seem okay and claim to be all natural. they dont contain dyes or anything like a lot of the other ones do. i like that it contains paba, which reduces thick scars and also copper, which may reduce additional scarring - after all copper peptides seem to help well.

anyhoo my main question was whether my scars would tan at the same rate as my normal skin and it seems that it will. so thanks heaps for your input :)

peace !

Edited by cartwheeling_monkey

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I could sure use a good tan. http://www.healthychoicenaturals.com/p-13-tanamins.aspx I didn't fine the connection between L-tyrosine and melanin. See Below

"Tyrosine

En Español (Spanish Version)

Sources | Therapeutic Dosages | Therapeutic Uses | What Is the Scientific Evidence for Tyrosine? | Safety Issues | References

Supplement Forms/Alternate Names

L-Tyrosine

Principal Proposed Uses

None

Other Proposed Uses

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD); Depression; Enhancing Mental Function; Fatigue; Jet Lag; Enhancing Sports Performance

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tyrosine is an amino acid found in meat proteins. Your body uses it as a starting material to make several neurotransmitters (chemicals that help the brain and nervous system function). Based on this fact, tyrosine has been proposed as a treatment for various conditions in which mental function is impaired or slowed down, such as fatigue and depression. It has also been tried for attention deficit disorder (ADD).

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sources

Your body makes tyrosine from another common amino acid, phenylalanine, so deficiencies are rare; however, they can occur in certain forms of severe kidney disease as well as in phenylketonuria (PKU), a metabolic disorder that requires complete avoidance of phenylalanine.

Good sources of tyrosine include dairy products, meats, fish, and beans.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Therapeutic Dosages

The typical therapeutic dosage of tyrosine used in studies ranges from 7 g to 30 g daily.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Therapeutic Uses

Preliminary evidence, including small, double-blind trials, suggests that tyrosine supplements may help fight fatigue and improve memory and mental function in people who are deprived of sleep or exposed to other forms of stress.1,10,12

Based on the findings, mentioned in the above paragraph, it has been inferred that tyrosine might enhance alertness in people suffering from jet lag, but this has not been studied directly.

Tyrosine may also provide some temporary benefit for attention deficit disorder (ADD), but the benefits appear to wear off in a couple of weeks.2,3,4 Tyrosine is said to work better for this purpose when it is combined in an "amino acid cocktail" along with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), phenylalanine, and glutamine; however, there is no scientific evidence to support this use.

Although one extremely tiny study found tyrosine helpful for depression;5 a larger study found no evidence of benefit.6

Tyrosine has also been suggested for enhancing sports performance. However, in a double-blind study of 20 men, one-time use of tyrosine at a dose 150 mg per kilogram body weight failed to improve any measurement of muscular performance.11

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What Is the Scientific Evidence for Tyrosine?

Sleep Deprivation

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study that enrolled 20 US Marines suggests that tyrosine can improve mental alertness during periods of sleep deprivation.7 In this study, the participants were deprived of sleep for a night and then tested frequently for their alertness throughout the day as they worked. Compared to placebo, 10 g to 15 g of tyrosine given twice daily seemed to provide a "pick-up" for about 2 hours.

Similar benefits were seen with 2 g of tyrosine daily in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 21 military cadets exposed to physical and psychological stress.10

Depression

A pilot study that enrolled 9 individuals is widely quoted as proving that tyrosine can help depression.8 However, this study was too small to provide reliable results. A subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 65 people with depression failed to find any benefit.9

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Safety Issues

Tyrosine seems to be generally safe, though at high dosages some people have reported nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, or nervousness. As with any other supplement taken in multigram doses, it is important to use a high-quality product; even a very small percentage of contaminant in the product might add up to a dangerous amount.

Maximum safe dosages for young children, women who are pregnant or nursing, or those with severe liver or kidney disease have not been established.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

References [ + ]

1. Neri DF, Wiegmann D, Stanny RR, et al. The effects of tyrosine on cognitive performance during extended wakefulness. Avit Space Environ Med. 1995;66:313-319.

2. Eisenberg MD, Asnis GM, van Praag HM, et al. Effect of tyrosine on attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity. J Clin Psychiatry. 1988;49:193-195.

3. Reimherr FW, Wender PH, Wood RD, et al. An open trial of L-tyrosine in the treatment of attention deficit disorder, residual type. Am J Psychiatry. 1987;144:1071-1073.

4. Wood RD, Reimherr FW, Wender PH, et al. Amino acid precursors for the treatment of attention deficit disorder, residual type. Psychopharmacol Bull. 1985;21:146-149.

5. Gibson C, Gelenberg A. Tyrosine for the treatment of depression. Adv Biol Psychiatry. 1983;10:148-159.

6. Gelenberg AJ, Wojcik JD, Falk WE, et al. Tyrosine for depression: a double-blind trial. J Affect Disord. 1990; 19:125-132.

7. Neri DF, Wiegmann D, Stanny RR, et al. The effects of tyrosine on cognitive performance during extended wakefulness. Avit Space Environ Med. 1995;66:313-319.

8. Gibson C, Gelenberg A. Tyrosine for the treatment of depression. Adv Biol Psychiatry. 1983;10:148-159.

9. Gelenberg AJ, Wojcik JD, Falk WE, et al. Tyrosine for depression: a double-blind trial. J Affect Disord. 1990; 19:125-132.

10. Deijen JB, Wientjes CJ, Vullinghs HF, et al. Tyrosine improves cognitive performance and reduces blood pressure in cadets after one week of a combat training course. Brain Res Bull. 1999;48:203-209.

11. Sutton EE, Coill MR, Deuster PA, et al. Ingestion of tyrosine: effects on endurance, muscle strength, and anaerobic performance. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2005;*****3-85.

12. Mahoney CR, Castellani J, Kramer FM, et al. Tyrosine supplementation mitigates working memory decrements during cold exposure. Physiol Behav. 2007 May 22. [Epub ahead of print]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last reviewed February 2010 by EBSCO CAM Review Board

Last Updated: 02/01/2010

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This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition."

Also, there was no reference to it on QuackWatch.

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Not to get off topic too much.................

If you have hypothyroidism, which I do,

(low thyroid) you might take synthyroid to

replace the missing hormone your body is not

producing. The side effect here is your thyroid

will begin to shut down, sensing no need to

produce thyroxine. Another route would be to take

the amino acid L-tyrosine, a precursor to thyroxine

(and perhaps a little ioidine). Thus encouraging

your body to produce thyroxine in the "natural"

way, encouraging your thyroid to function properly.

Keeping your body functioning in the normal,

"natural" chain of events. I take 500 mg bid, empty stomach, before meals.

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Not to get off topic too much.................

If you have hypothyroidism, which I do,

(low thyroid) you might take synthyroid to

replace the missing hormone your body is not

producing. The side effect here is your thyroid

will begin to shut down, sensing no need to

produce thyroxine. Another route would be to take

the amino acid L-tyrosine, a precursor to thyroxine

(and perhaps a little ioidine). Thus encouraging

your body to produce thyroxine in the "natural"

way, encouraging your thyroid to function properly.

Keeping your body functioning in the normal,

"natural" chain of events. I take 500 mg bid, empty stomach, before meals.

i think my thyroid is working correctly. i have no clue what it regulates in all honesty but isnt it related to metabolism, weight and scarring? if so i think mine must be working well since im pretty skinny. i do scar easilly but thats only on the face.

Edited by cartwheeling_monkey

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