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theGreyhound

Tea Tree Oil - does skin become resistant?

I have been mixing tea tree oil (in very small concentrations) into my shampoo to treat my scalp, as well as swabbing diluted tea tree oil onto my face every few days.

Is it possible for the body/skin/bacteria to become resistant to this stuff in the way that it can become resistant to an antibiotic?

-Andrew

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I have been mixing tea tree oil (in very small concentrations) into my shampoo to treat my scalp, as well as swabbing diluted tea tree oil onto my face every few days.

Is it possible for the body/skin/bacteria to become resistant to this stuff in the way that it can become resistant to an antibiotic?

-Andrew

Yes. I no longer use it.

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I have been mixing tea tree oil (in very small concentrations) into my shampoo to treat my scalp, as well as swabbing diluted tea tree oil onto my face every few days.

Is it possible for the body/skin/bacteria to become resistant to this stuff in the way that it can become resistant to an antibiotic?

-Andrew

NO. Your skin cannot become resistant to tea tree oil. Don't know what he ^^^ is talking about.

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I've became intrested in Tea Tree Oil, and adding it into my day to help with my acne, however I go a few questions.

What kind do you get and where?

How do you incorporate it into your regimen, as you already have a morning/night routine?

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I use it regularly and I love it. I've been using it for three years with no perceived decrease in effectiveness. I use it straight and undiluted, which people say you're not supposed to do, but it works great for me. I do an aspirin mask and then pat four or five drops of tea tree oil onto my entire face.

Just don't get it in or near your eyes -- it burns! Feels great on the rest of my skin though -- very cooling.

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my skin became sensitive to tea tree oil after using it diluted for a spot treatment after 3 months. i started to get little white itchy bumps in the area and around where i was applying it. it almost looked like a chemical burn. i stopped using it for a long time. then last month i decided to try it again on a pimple that was popping up. big mistake! i only put a dab on, one time, and the skin around that pimple started to react again like a burn with the itchy spots. it took over 2.5 weeks for the skin to scab, peel off and heal completely. it looked nasty. personally, i will not touch the stuff again which is unfortunate because it worked pretty good for me in the beginning.

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I've read that if the concentration is less than 10% TTO it can lose effectiveness over time because of bacterial resistance to it.

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I've read that if the concentration is less than 10% TTO it can lose effectiveness over time because of bacterial resistance to it.

This ^. After awhile it does nothing. The others in this thread are noobs in training.

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I use pure tea tree oil on my face all the time. Mostly as a sport treatment - works wonders, better than AHA or BP.

Anything is better than AHA. That stuff is grease in a tube. Probably the worse product I've ever used in my life. Dan's BP though is still good so you win some and you lose some.

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I've read that if the concentration is less than 10% TTO it can lose effectiveness over time because of bacterial resistance to it.

10%? I thought that was considered a high enough percentage to kill off bacteria. From what I've read (2007 research) TTO concentrations of 4% and less are bad, but anything above that is strong enough to do the job, it won't cause resistance then. Anyway, to answer the OP's question: if you want to dilute TTO, make sure you use a high enough percentage, otherwise it will do more bad than good in the long run.

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Anyway, to answer the OP's question: if you want to dilute TTO, make sure you use a high enough percentage, otherwise it will do more bad than good in the long run.

Can you explain this a bit more?

What do you mean?

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PS. I only use it as a spot treatment occasionally(!!!) since I am post-Accutane, and occasionally as a toner on my cheeks only and very much diluted in water.

I don't mix it in with anything and cover my whole face. Just spot treatment.

Thanks for all the help once again!

Edited by andrewharv

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Can you explain this a bit more?

What do you mean?

Simply put: if you use an amount that is not sufficient to kill the bacteria, they will go in defense mode and grow more resistant (also for antibiotics). That's why products containing only a little bit of TTO are not good at all.

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Ohhhh ok :).

Well I use just a little more than what is typically advised and I always combine it with my evening facewash or shampoo, so the bacteria gets double-whammied.

I've only used the tea tree oil as a toner/spot treatment on my face once (a few days ago) and everything has already dried up.

Brilliant stuff. :)

My plan is to use it very rarely and in small amounts such that my body will never become resistant.

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I have been mixing tea tree oil (in very small concentrations) into my shampoo to treat my scalp, as well as swabbing diluted tea tree oil onto my face every few days.

Is it possible for the body/skin/bacteria to become resistant to this stuff in the way that it can become resistant to an antibiotic?

-Andrew

Yes it is possible that the bacteria and yeast become resistant to it! You can not use too much, and too little. Go to a health food store and ask about GSE. It is more powerful that tea tree oil, and safer.

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Grapefruit is a terrible irritant though... so I am confused.

Can you tell me what is unsafe about tea tree oil? I should know the facts if I'm going to use it though it seems fairly innocent.

If it stops working, I will rotate to Benzyl Peroxide spot treatment again, and then back to tea tree oil eventually. I can keep rotating. My acne is going away anyway, so three years from now it should be gone anyway.

Edited by andrewharv

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NO. Your skin cannot become resistant to tea tree oil. Don't know what he ^^^ is talking about.

You're both wrong. And you're both right. AKL was headed in the right direction, so I'll expand a little.

A more specific question is, "Can acnebecome resistant to tree tea oil?"

All living things are hardwired to survive. That is why the human race has been to hell and back and is larger in numbers today than it has ever been. The same applies to single celled organisms, like bacteria.

You've probably heard that people (rather, bacteria) develop a resistance to antibiotics. The same can be said for antiseptics, which is one of tree tea oils fine qualities. In this case, it depends on the severity of acne. With mild acne, it is unlikely a resistance will develop. The bacteria isn't deep enough.

P.acne is one of the slower types of bacteria, in terms of reproduction. Even still, dozens of generations emerge in a week's time. While some die off due to the antiseptic, the key lies with the exposed bacteria who survive. With continued treatment, generation after generation of survivors develop a greater resistance.

Cysts and nodules stick around longer and the bacteria can travel. So it is possible that over a greater length of time, tree tea oil will have a completely unnoticeable effect.

So mild to = unlikely. Severe = very likely. Moderate can go either way, since it's a poorly defined category.

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If what you just explained is something scientifically agreed upon (this board lacks that) then I am definitely happy to hear that. My acne is mild so I imagine it won't lose its effectiveness then.

I do understand what you mean about the whole process though. Thank you!

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