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nos86

Oily skin after washing your face

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I 've been on accutane twice. the second time after I got off my skin's oilyness returned. Tried all kinds of stuff to help with the oilyness but nothing really helped.

Doctor said that oily skin is hard to combat. So where does that leave me. SOL

Anyways I tried Jojoba oil on my face after washing morning and night. Although it is not comepletely cured I would say the oilyness is reduced by 75-85 percent. Give it a shot, do some research on it.

Good luck fellow friends.

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Yeah oddly enough putting on jojoba oil made my skin feel like it already was moisturized and therefore did not put my oil glands into overdrive.

Sounds like you are being sarcastic not sure but anyways

it may help for some people. Iam just posting this because it has helped me a little and maybe someone else can benefit from it.

I read a lot of people talking shit on here, dissing on one another on certain topics and honestly it doensn't really help the situation. Why are we here in the first place? I am hoping to find some answers are gain from the experience of others. And maybe help someone out there in search for some answers. Good luck all.

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Yeah oddly enough putting on jojoba oil made my skin feel like it already was moisturized and therefore did not put my oil glands into overdrive.

Not being moisturized doesn't "put your oil [sebaceous] glands into overdrive". Where have you been for the last few years?

Sounds like you are being sarcastic not sure...

Uh YES, I was being sarcastic.

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so what do you recommend for people dealing with oily skin?

Do you have oily skin? If so don't you notice an increase in oil production when you don't moisturize?

Edited by nos86

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so what do you recommend for people dealing with oily skin?

There's not much I can recommend on that. Accutane would certainly help, obviously, but that would be an extreme thing to do just for the sake of reducing sebum.

The sebaceous glands are under androgenic control, so the use of antiandrogens should theoretically be useful. But systemic antiandrogens can't be used by men, and the use of topical antiandrogens is still in its infancy. They work to some degree, but the really good ones are extremely expensive and difficult to obtain.

One thing you could try is washing your face with Nizoral shampoo. The active ingredient in Nizoral (ketoconazole) has been shown to have antiandrogenic properties, and appeared to reduce the size of sebaceous glands in the scalp by about 20% or so in one famous study. It _may_ do the same thing on the face. Be careful if you try that, though...it may be too harsh to use on your face!

It may be that the only things that have any real promise for you are those products that you put on your face, and are designed to absorb extra oil.

Do you have oily skin? If so don't you notice an increase in oil production when you don't moisturize?

I don't have oily skin and I don't moisturize my face, but you can see that thread I started a few years ago in which I tested the effect of severely washing my skin on my own sebum production (I used Sebutape test-strips to accurately measure the results). Even though washing my skin several times a day with Ivory soap clearly dried the moisture out of it, it had no effect at all on my sebum production.

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[q

I don't have oily skin and I don't moisturize my face, but you can see that thread I started a few years ago in which I tested the effect of severely washing my skin on my own sebum production (I used Sebutape test-strips to accurately measure the results). Even though washing my skin several times a day with Ivory soap clearly dried the moisture out of it, it had no effect at all on my sebum production.

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I understand but there is only one issue with your test. You don't have oily skin.

I would like to see the same test done with someone who has oily skin and I bet the results will differ.

Why is that? Is it because you're simply BOUND AND DETERMINED to believe the myth that moisture-dry skin causes more oil production, so you'll find any little fault with my experiment that you possibly can? :):dance:

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Well what nos86 is saying is right. You can't take a bone dry person and expect them to get oily after washing their face. And there is something called reactive Seborrhea. That is if you wash your scalp too much and strip it of all its natural oils, it will produce more oil in turn to counter that. You can google about this in relation to dandruff. Maybe something similar can happen on the facial skin. BTW seborrhea is also caused due to oily skin.

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Well what nos86 is saying is right. You can't take a bone dry person and expect them to get oily after washing their face.

But I never said that I was "bone dry", just that I don't make as much sebum as most young teenagers. And the level of sebum I was producing didn't change at all, whether I was washing vigorously several times a day with harsh soap, or not washing AT ALL.

And there is something called reactive Seborrhea.

No, I DON'T think there's such a thing as reactive seborrhea.

That is if you wash your scalp too much and strip it of all its natural oils, it will produce more oil in turn to counter that.

That myth has been debunked for years on this site.

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Well what nos86 is saying is right. You can't take a bone dry person and expect them to get oily after washing their face.

But I never said that I was "bone dry", just that I don't make as much sebum as most young teenagers. And the level of sebum I was producing didn't change at all, whether I was washing vigorously several times a day with harsh soap, or not washing AT ALL.

And there is something called reactive Seborrhea.

No, I DON'T think there's such a thing as reactive seborrhea.

Well I read about this on a dermatology website when I was googling about dandruff (I have that too) and I think a doctor would know more about this than you. You can google about it.

That is if you wash your scalp too much and strip it of all its natural oils, it will produce more oil in turn to counter that.

That myth has been debunked for years on this site.

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Well I read about this on a dermatology website when I was googling about dandruff (I have that too) and I think a doctor would know more about this than you.

I question whether that was actually a "dermatology website" you read, or just some site run by lay people who are trying to sell you their own products for various conditions (acne, dandruff, skin care, etc.).

I can show you lots of doctors (including Kligman, who is a LEGEND in the field of dermatology) who don't believe that washing the skin causes it to produce more sebum. I'll repost this again:

"Sebum secretion and sebaceous lipids." - published in Dermatologic Clinics, Vol. 1, No. 3, July 1983.

"... These observations gave rise to a long-lived fallacy (1927-1957) that was posthumously christened the "feedback theory" by Kligman and Shelley (23). The idea was that sebaceous glands secrete only when necessary to replenish lipid that has been wiped or washed away. Nothing known about the physiology of sebaceous glands gives any theoretical support to this concept, and it has been thoroughly disproved experimentally (23). Sebum is secreted continuously. The reason that lipid levels eventually cease to increase apparently is that the skin can hold only a certain amount of lipid in its crevices, and the rest tends to flow away from sites of high sebum production (23)."

23) Kligman, A. M., and Shelley, W. B.: "An Investigation of the Biology of the Human Sebaceous Gland". Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 30:99-124, 1958.

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Well what nos86 is saying is right. You can't take a bone dry person and expect them to get oily after washing their face. And there is something called reactive Seborrhea. That is if you wash your scalp too much and strip it of all its natural oils, it will produce more oil in turn to counter that. You can google about this in relation to dandruff. Maybe something similar can happen on the facial skin. BTW seborrhea is also caused due to oily skin.

The specific cause of seborrhea is unknown, although it does occur on the oilier parts of the face/body.

Some possible causes include a certain kind of yeast (Malassezia furfur, formerly known as Pityrosporum ovale), as well as genetic, environmental and general health factors.

Oily skin does NOT cause seborrhea. In the case of yeast, the oily parts of the body would create a beautiful breeding ground for yeast.

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what bryan has said is true.

All one needs to do is go and do some research on how the sebaceous glands function. You will find that sebaceous glands are androgen meditated and that they are not influenced in any way, shape or form from external factors like over washing.

Seriously...dig into the google search engine and pubmed etc. and have a serious study of the sebaceous glands. Read studies and dermatology journal extracts. You can satisfy your mind without having to just agree with bryan or myself or anyone else here.

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I understand but there is only one issue with your test. You don't have oily skin.

I would like to see the same test done with someone who has oily skin and I bet the results will differ.

Why is that? Is it because you're simply BOUND AND DETERMINED to believe the myth that moisture-dry skin causes more oil production, so you'll find any little fault with my experiment that you possibly can? :):dance:

No I am not bound or determined to have anything to do with you at all.

Congrats on your experiment man but you've failed to conduct it with at least two different variables. That my friend is more than a LITTLE FAULT. If everyone conducted test with only one specimen and no variables then the results would be inconclusive. But you already knew that right.

Look I'll level with you man, I am not here to have a pissing contest with you, and I honestly don't really care unless you have something positive to contribute. I am just trying to find a solution to a problem that a lot of people are concerned about. Is that not why this site was created? If you have oily skin then you would know that some days you're more oily than others. But since you don't, I would not worry about DEBUNKING this and DEBUNKING that. Cause truthfully everyone is different and ONE SET OF RULES DOES NOT APPLY TO EVERYBODY.

Science is forever changing. So results will vary. Just because someone debunks something on the this site years ago does not mean that evolution has not occurred. People change, things change.

So if you have something positive to say great I am all ears, if not I apologize if I said something that we disagree on. But it's okay if we disagree, doesn't make you or me wrong, just that we disagree.

cheers

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I understand but there is only one issue with your test. You don't have oily skin.

I would like to see the same test done with someone who has oily skin and I bet the results will differ.

Why is that? Is it because you're simply BOUND AND DETERMINED to believe the myth that moisture-dry skin causes more oil production, so you'll find any little fault with my experiment that you possibly can? :):dance:

No I am not bound or determined to have anything to do with you at all.

Congrats on your experiment man but you've failed to conduct it with at least two different variables. That my friend is more than a LITTLE FAULT. If everyone conducted test with only one specimen and no variables then the results would be inconclusive. But you already knew that right.

I don't think it's a "little fault" at all. Look, YOU asked ME if my skin gets oilier when I don't use a moisturizer, and I gave you an honest answer. If you don't like my answer, you shouldn't have asked the question.

By the way, if you really think that how much sebum a person normally produces has an effect on whether or not washing increases it further, you need to read the threads I've started on the "feedback theory"; for example, "The myth of skin washing and sebum production". Here's the direct link:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/myth-skin...ebu-t35818.html

And then there's my thread, "Still more evidence against the 'feedback theory' ". Here's the direct link for that one:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/evidence-...-th-t71047.html

Here's one that indirectly is related to this issue: "Does sebum help 'moisturize' the skin??" Here's the direct link:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/sebum-moi...ski-t75063.html

This is the thread in which I performed the test on myself with Sebutape test-strips: "FINALLY: a more direct test of the 'feedback theory' ". Here's the direct link:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/FINALLY-d...est-t81548.html

Here's an early thread of mine which has an important indirect link to the "feedback theory", and one in which I also performed an interesting test on myself with Sebutape test-strips: "If you stop washing, do you get MORE oily, or do you get LESS oily??" Here's the direct link:

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/stop-wash...ily-t77488.html

Look I'll level with you man, I am not here to have a pissing contest with you, and I honestly don't really care unless you have something positive to contribute. I am just trying to find a solution to a problem that a lot of people are concerned about. Is that not why this site was created? If you have oily skin then you would know that some days you're more oily than others. But since you don't, I would not worry about DEBUNKING this and DEBUNKING that. Cause truthfully everyone is different and ONE SET OF RULES DOES NOT APPLY TO EVERYBODY.

It _does_ apply to everybody, in at least that one case: washing has no effect on sebum production, and it doesn't make any difference if you produce a lot of sebum, or not very much. Don't take my word for it, READ THE SCIENCE, man!

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bryan do you have autism or something you think your SO smart go get a degree in something and then you can try to act like the greatest person who ever existed like your such a fag

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bryan do you have autism or something you think your SO smart go get a degree in something and then you can try to act like the greatest person who ever existed like your such a fag

Way to make an ad hominem attack on bryan, who, although caustic and abrasive (much like an industrial-strength cleaner), does know what he's talking about.

You've been reported, boy-o.

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I have very oily skin. I've read that jojoba oil is similar to our skins natural oils so it helps to neutralize production but it doesn't seem to work for me. I tried once before then stopped. I started recently and it still doesn't absorb well into my skin so I think it just sits on it. So I might stop again. I usually put a drop into my moisturizer.

So I'm surprised it worked for you! How are you using it?

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I have very oily skin. I've read that jojoba oil is similar to our skins natural oils so it helps to neutralize production but it doesn't seem to work for me.

Did you ever think that maybe that's just a ridiculous urban myth? :)

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I've ordered my jojoba oil and my vitamin B5.

Just waiting for it to ship.

I just wanted to ask a few things.

Did vitamin B5 work for you?

How much jojoba oil did you apply twice a day?

Did you get initial breakout from either method?

How long did you use it before seeing reduced oil production on your face?

Does it only reduce the area that you put on?

Thanks in advance!

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have started using tomatoes to combat my extremely oily skin.

So far it dries me out really good but since I also have large pores I need to rub ice on it. Also i have a rash on my hand --eczema that has been going away with every use of tomato scrub. Try it out it may help you. I only use a quarter of the tomato but i do the cleanse 2 times a day.

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