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bɭesstheʄẚɭɭ

(Vegetarian) Foods that you can eat to get ~100%+ of most major vitamin/minerals

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As a college student whose college provides ample food in their buffet dining center (which is heaven) I've concluded the foods that I have access to that provide over 100% of the DRI for most of the nutrients.

When school starts back up, I plan to follow this at least 3-4 times a week, but not everyday because some values are well over the 100% range...Vit D for instance!

Well here is the PDF of my intake and goals provided.

And this is the list of foods I have for a day. I used some examples y'all gave from my other thread that helped in selecting foods.

***and this is my schedule again that works best for me***

Breakfast:

1 scoop whey concentrate

10oz unsweetened rice or soy milk.

Lunch at my School's Dining Center...it's a buffet:

1 Apple

2 Bananas

2 cups Orange Juice

1 Cheese Pizza slice

2 servings of Cuban Black Beans (subst. Pinto Beans is possible)

2 servings of enriched yellow rice

2 tablespoons of sour cream

1 small serving of scrambled eggs (with salt)

Dinner:

1.5 cup of raw spinach, trimmed leaves

2-3 tablespoons of Bragg's sesame & ginger salad dressing - SO GOOD

1 table spoon of wheat germ oil on salad... or whole wheat germ (for the Vit. E)

1 table spoon of EVOO

1 serving plain (non-fat preferably) yogurt

Snacks throughout day:

.5 cup blueberries

2 kiwis

1 teaspoon cod liver oil

1 cup of Bolthouse's Mocha Cappacino drink (I buy the 4-svg bottle for ~ $3.20 each...sometimes it's 2 for $4)

3 tablespoons oil-roasted, salted, cashews

And that's it!!!

Only problem is the bolt-house drink can be expensive over time, but one big bottle provides 4 servings like I said, so it can last a while. It's packed with Potassium and B12, Zinc, etc.

________________________________________________________________________________

So yeah, I'm sure you all could find out what you can eat to achieve a well-rounded diet if you haven't explored it yet. I used Diet Analysis 8.0, but that costs money. FitDay.com is another great and free program online. I'm sure this will help my complexion out a bit also.

...Also, this isn't perfect. I feel I'm lacking on the vegetables and grains, so some tweaking will occur. Perhaps quinoa would be a good addition.

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Mmmm reading through your university's list of food made my mouth water. :drool: Perhaps I should go veggo. You've made it look so darn appealing lol.

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I'm not interested in calculating all the nutrients in my food, but here's a super-nutrient dense recipe.

Cook lentils (pre-soaked) with lots of onion and garlic (chopped fine and allowed to sit for 10 minutes before cooking), chopped sweet potatoes and a curry powder high in tumeric. And some salt, of course, but less is needed with all that garlic. Once everything is cooked, stir in some spinach, collards or other dark greens. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil. And a dollop of plain yogurt if you eat dairy.

The lentils are a quality protein, but legumes in general are limited in the sulfur containing amino acids, i.e. methionine/cysteine. The greens are high in methionine along with tons of other nutrients. Onions and garlic are also high in sulfur compounds and quercetin. Tumeric is high in curcumin. And sweet potatoes are of course high in beta carotene and plenty of other vitamins, plus hyaluronic acid.

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nutritiondata.com is an excellent free place to check out the nutritional content of foods. They have a pretty substantial library of whole foods and brand name foods to check the nutritional value of. Then you can put together what you ate in a day to see how balanced your diet is.

That being said - I agree with alternatevista in not micromanaging nutrient intake or carb/protein/fat intake. Eat a variety of whole foods and you'll cover your nutritional basis. As far as carb/protein/fat ratio goes, I don't think it makes a difference. Different populations around the world live on high carb low fat diets, or low carb high fat diets and do fine. It has more to do with the quality of the food you eat.

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I'm not interested in calculating all the nutrients in my food, but here's a super-nutrient dense recipe.

Cook lentils (pre-soaked) with lots of onion and garlic (chopped fine and allowed to sit for 10 minutes before cooking), chopped sweet potatoes and a curry powder high in tumeric. And some salt, of course, but less is needed with all that garlic. Once everything is cooked, stir in some spinach, collards or other dark greens. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil. And a dollop of plain yogurt if you eat dairy.

The lentils are a quality protein, but legumes in general are limited in the sulfur containing amino acids, i.e. methionine/cysteine. The greens are high in methionine along with tons of other nutrients. Onions and garlic are also high in sulfur compounds and quercetin. Tumeric is high in curcumin. And sweet potatoes are of course high in beta carotene and plenty of other vitamins, plus hyaluronic acid.

Alternativista you are always full of good info!!! thanks! That recipe sound so delicious, and I think I have most the stuff.

I am wondering - how long do you soak lentils for and how long do you cook them for?

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