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InquisitiveCreature

Probiotics in Dairy?...

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Supplements or other fermented foods like sauerkraut or kimchee. There are such things as coconut milk kefir. And of course, soy yogurt and kefir, but you want to be careful with soy.

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If I'm trying to up my intake of probiotics, and probiotics are found in dairy products..what do I do if I cut dairy from my diet? I take PB 8 but would like to get good bacteria from my food as well.

Supplementing with probiotics will give you a much higher live bacteria count than yogurt or kefir could ever do.

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be careful about cutting out dairy. I cut it out 6 months ago, then went back to it - not a damn bit of difference. I would say if you don't see any difference from cutting out the dairy after a month or so, don't think it'll suddenly kick in 5 months later.

Dairy really is not a bad thing. It's a very healthy food group.

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be careful about cutting out dairy. I cut it out 6 months ago, then went back to it - not a damn bit of difference. I would say if you don't see any difference from cutting out the dairy after a month or so, don't think it'll suddenly kick in 5 months later.

Dairy really is not a bad thing. It's a very healthy food group.

It changes from person to person. I cut it out as well, along with other diet changes, months ago. I introduced it back as an experiment. Things looked good, until I was 2 weeks in when I got a beak out in places I had no broken out since I changed my lifestyle (shoulders and neck). Very bad cysts as well.

If it doesn't affect you, sure, dairy on. I would recommend you stay away from it for a couple of months and see what happens.

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I would recommend you stay away from it for a couple of months and see what happens.

Thank you, I'll try that. Honestly, I've never noticed food affecting my acne...I'm going to try it mostly for oily skin I guess, or both, we'll see how it goes.

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If I'm trying to up my intake of probiotics, and probiotics are found in dairy products..what do I do if I cut dairy from my diet? I take PB 8 but would like to get good bacteria from my food as well.

Supplementing with probiotics will give you a much higher live bacteria count than yogurt or kefir could ever do.

That's actually not true. Homemade kefir and yogurt will have far higher bacteria levels than commercial probiotic supplements. A bowl of homemade yogurt fermented for 24 hours has more than a a trillion bacteria--a lot more than the 10 or 15 billion in most pills.

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be careful about cutting out dairy. I cut it out 6 months ago, then went back to it - not a damn bit of difference. I would say if you don't see any difference from cutting out the dairy after a month or so, don't think it'll suddenly kick in 5 months later.

Dairy really is not a bad thing. It's a very healthy food group.

I had cut dairy out for over a year.. with exceptions here and there...finally i got brave at the end of october and didnt think twice about dairy... it actually seemed like it cleared me up really well for some reason by ingesting the dairy this time lol why i dont know but i just kept at it and now dec 18 i have cystic acne poppin up again like i did before.. the only thing i've done different is masterbate a little more than normal and put dairy back in my life......

so im feeling like its one of the 2 but it not doing nothing for 2 months of using dairy i feel like it might be the master ima test both out

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That's actually not true. Homemade kefir and yogurt will have far higher bacteria levels than commercial probiotic supplements. A bowl of homemade yogurt fermented for 24 hours has more than a a trillion bacteria--a lot more than the 10 or 15 billion in most pills.

Aside from the fact that you're comparing a bowl of yogurt to a supplement pill (which doesn't seem quite fair), where did you get those numbers?

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That's actually not true. Homemade kefir and yogurt will have far higher bacteria levels than commercial probiotic supplements. A bowl of homemade yogurt fermented for 24 hours has more than a a trillion bacteria--a lot more than the 10 or 15 billion in most pills.

Aside from the fact that you're comparing a bowl of yogurt to a supplement pill (which doesn't seem quite fair), where did you get those numbers?

How does that not seem fair? The serving size of yogurt isn't going to be 1.37 ml, just as you wouldn't be swallowing a bowl size pill. The pill would be only the probiotics, and the stuff that the probiotics need to survive. While the yogurt would be everything else included, so of course the pill is going to be stronger.

With that being said, I think kefir is the best of the three. It provides more probiotics than yogurt, and it provides a wider variety of probiotics than yogurt and a supplement. I would like to be able to say that yogurt and kefir provide a greater amount of probiotics than a supplement, but I haven't done any research on it, and haven't seen any conclusive data from anyone here.

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Aside from the fact that you're comparing a bowl of yogurt to a supplement pill (which doesn't seem quite fair), where did you get those numbers?

How does that not seem fair?

It doesn't seem to be a fair comparison because a bowl of yogurt is a much greater volume than a single pill.

The serving size of yogurt isn't going to be 1.37 ml, just as you wouldn't be swallowing a bowl size pill. The pill would be only the probiotics, and the stuff that the probiotics need to survive. While the yogurt would be everything else included, so of course the pill is going to be stronger.

Let's put it this way: one would reasonably expect a supplement pill or capsule to contain a greater density or concentration of the bacteria per unit of volume than a common food like yogurt. In any event, I hope the other poster does reply and say where he got those specific numbers.

Edited by bryan
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I would recommend you stay away from it for a couple of months and see what happens.

Thank you, I'll try that. Honestly, I've never noticed food affecting my acne...I'm going to try it mostly for oily skin I guess, or both, we'll see how it goes.

I never noticed food affecting my acne either. That is until I changed my diet and my skin cleared.

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It doesn't seem to be a fair comparison because a bowl of yogurt is a much greater volume than a single pill.

Obviously. We normally consume food in higher volume than a pill. It would be idiotic to compare the same volumes.

The yogurt or kefir is food. As in your breakfast, smoothie, dessert, etc. With protein, potassium and other valuable nutrients. If it's dairy that is. I don't know offhand what all is in coconut besides fat.

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The point is that probiotics aren't a superior source of beneficial bacteria...

This article discusses the superiority of homemade yogurt and kefir to probiotic supplements.

http://www.healingcrow.com/ferfun/conspiracy/conspiracy.html

After reading that interesting link, I'm not convinced that yogurt and kefir are "superior" to supplements (whether or not those first two are homemade adds another complicating variable to the mix). I think good arguments can be made for all of them.

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The point is that probiotics aren't a superior source of beneficial bacteria...

This article discusses the superiority of homemade yogurt and kefir to probiotic supplements.

http://www.healingcrow.com/ferfun/conspiracy/conspiracy.html

After reading that interesting link, I'm not convinced that yogurt and kefir are "superior" to supplements (whether or not those first two are homemade adds another complicating variable to the mix). I think good arguments can be made for all of them.

Well at least you found it interesting. =) I'd urge you to look at some of the other SCD literature and some case studies where they treat children with autism and other diseases with homemade yogurt. In terms of track record for treating disease, I don't think there is any comparison b/w commercial probitoics and homemade cultured dairy.

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I forgot to mention this and I don't remember if anyone else has in this thread. Kombucha tea contains healthy bacteria and it has no dairy in it.

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