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crashoran

How to cook fish?

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I'm a college student who has been used to eating fast food and microwave dinners for the past few years. My acne is terrible, so I want to change my eating habits around and eat more like non-westernized countries. Just lots of fruits and vegetables.

I just picked up a tilapia at the store. I looked online for recipes but they all tell me to add stuff that I don't want in my diet (mayonaise, butter, etc).

Can I just cook the tilapia in the oven without adding anything? I'm such a newbie at cooking...

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I would suggest using a frying pan and cooking it using some coconut oil. You could add some organic spices (ones which are not irradiated) like cayenne pepper to give it some extra flavor. Please do not use vegetable oil to cook the fish!

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I have some really good recipes at home that I can post for you later. I like to bake fish - its usually really easy and you often only need a few ingredients.

If you want to get the most benefit from adding fish to your diet, you'll probably want to do more salmon, tuna, mackerel - the fatty fishes are generally much healthier and are where you get the most omega-3's. I know salmon can be pricey, but its my favorite fish to cook!

BTW - you can always use olive oil in place of butter in a recipe.

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For thicker fish like salmon, I usually poach, grill or broil. For tilapia, I'd pan fry, grill or broil. No mayo or bread crumbs, just a few spices, lemon juice, etc. Do you have a broiler in your oven? Or a grill pan or George Foreman-type grill?

Most supermarkets will steam cook any fish, like salmon, you buy from them, so you can have it done while you shop, and pick up some broccoli to steam to go with it for a quick meal.

And there are many recipes in the Food and Recipe thread under Important topics.

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Steaming is probably the healthiest cooking method by far, followed by grilling and broiling. I'd check cooking sites like epicurious.com for recipe ideas.

By the way, tilapia is a farmed fish. Wild fish (you can usually find them in the supermarket labeled that way) are a lot more beneficial to your health.

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steaming is the healthiest...

Usually my mom would steam it with ginger, onion, and drizzle fish sauce or soy sauce at the end...

that's the chinese style.

But if you don't want all those crap load of sauce,

maybe you can try something like this:

http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/bro...10000001140497/

Probably tastes very plain though, but if the fish is good, you might love the natural taste of it.

I generally love to season fish fillet with spices, and olive oil,

and pan fry it with butter....... yea.. not healthy

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Of course you can eat fish without anything. I really like the taste of fish so for me it's no problem, maybe you do too?

I usually boil it. Steaming as katharine says is probably the very best alternative though, when it comes to preserving nutrients.

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Steaming is probably the healthiest cooking method by far, followed by grilling and broiling. I'd check cooking sites like epicurious.com for recipe ideas.

By the way, tilapia is a farmed fish. Wild fish (you can usually find them in the supermarket labeled that way) are a lot more beneficial to your health.

Supposedly the Idaho farmed trout are good. It's on the recommended list by that organizations whose name i can't think of, but maintains a list year round for what you should get at different time of the year. And they area fatty, therefore, high omega 3 fish.

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I love baked salmon! The spices you use are up to you, but after u marinate/rub the fish with them, put it in a baking pan thingy and just drizzle some oil over it for it to stay soft and succulent.

And for using olive oil as alternavista said, I tend to disagree. Although OO is healthy when eaten raw (not used for cooking), OO has a low steaming point and burns quickly. When this happens, the unsaturated fats are denatured and form trans fats, making it very unhealthy. Rumour also has it that the burnt oil can be carcinogenic.

When cooking, use light coloured oils as they can withstand high temperatures. I strongly recommend grapeseed oil as it's very healthy and does not burn easily.

Also, when cooking fish, do not exceed a cooking time of 8-10 minutes. (that is for baking and frying).

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And for using olive oil as alternavista said, I tend to disagree. Although OO is healthy when eaten raw (not used for cooking), OO has a low steaming point and burns quickly. When this happens, the unsaturated fats are denatured and form trans fats, making it very unhealthy. Rumour also has it that the burnt oil can be carcinogenic.

I didn't say anything about cooking with olive oil. I would never.

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I didn't say anything about cooking with olive oil. I would never.

Really, I swore I saw u said that in ur post. Oh well I guess not, sorry then.

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Steaming is probably the healthiest cooking method by far, followed by grilling and broiling. I'd check cooking sites like epicurious.com for recipe ideas.

By the way, tilapia is a farmed fish. Wild fish (you can usually find them in the supermarket labeled that way) are a lot more beneficial to your health.

Supposedly the Idaho farmed trout are good. It's on the recommended list by that organizations whose name i can't think of, but maintains a list year round for what you should get at different time of the year. And they area fatty, therefore, high omega 3 fish.

I haven't heard of the Idaho farmed trout but generally wild fish have a more favorable omega 3-6 ratio. By the way, farmed salmon are also "fatty" but contain high amounts of pro-inflammatory omega 6, less omega 3.

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