Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

So im new to the site, and have been doing some research on acne meds... and i found that benzoyl peroxide i was banned in Europe for several different reasons. it definitely worries me now (since i have been using bp for a while now, but not in abundance as suggested here)....what do u guys think? u can google it and see what u find for yourselves....but basically they're saying it isnt banned in America bc its cheap to produce and makes profit. here's just a few lines from the research i did:

"Acne preparations made of benzoyl peroxide may contain various other chemical ingredients. Glycolic acid is a photo sensitizer and may be toxic to gastrointestinal system, nervous system and kidneys. Triethanolamine can form carcinogenic nitrosamine compounds on the skin or in the body after absorption. It may also elicit immune reaction in form of allergic dermatitis or asthmatic attacks. Diisopropanolamine may release carcinogenic nitrosamine compounds."

they also say that it was found to cause cancer in rats after one year of use, and that it causes tumor growth.

I know we are all desperate for something that works, but my health is a priority as well. If it's banned in Europe, there must be some serious effects....

thanks for your responses....

Edited by Candace624

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BP is not banned in Europe. It is available at any pharmacy; it's just not available OVER THE COUNTER anymore.

And:

The following article was written by willow569 and I am posting it here with her permission.

Benzoyl Peroxide Safety

Q: Is there a link between benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer?

• Currently, no research has found a link between benzoyl peroxide use and skin cancer in humans. Two studies that investigated the link between benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer in people found no increased risk of skin cancer in people who had used benzoyl peroxide to treat acne. 1 2

• After conducting a series of studies and a doing a comprehensive review of the existing research on the link between benzoyl peroxide and skin cancer, one researcher concluded that “no epidemiological evidence exists of a carcinogenic effect of skin treatment with BPO containing gels or ointments in 5 or 10% concentrations.†3 Other experts have concluded that topical benzoyl peroxide is considered to be a safe treatment for acne and that there is no current evidence to indicate that it poses a carcinogenic or toxicological risk to humans. 4 5

• Research studies have used cancer-sensitive strains of mice to study the effects of benzoyl peroxide on tumor growth. The mice in these studies are generally pre-exposed to UV radiation or a chemical that causes the development of the tumors; then the benzoyl peroxide is applied to the mouse skin. Some of these studies have found that benzoyl peroxide caused existing tumors on the skin to grow larger, but did not cause the development of new tumors. 6 In the vast majority of studies, benzoyl peroxide was not found to cause new tumors to develop. These mouse studies are often cited on websites that are trying to sell alternatives to benzoyl peroxide as evidence that benzoyl peroxide is a carcinogen. The results of the studies and their implications may be overstated and misinterpreted by these companies.

• One article highlights the limitations of this line of research in mice for the application to safety assessment for humans: 7

o The mice used in the research are of a particularly sensitive strain – mice specifically bred to be susceptible to developing tumors.

o There are significant physiological differences between mouse and human skin.

o Other substances that are tumor promoters in mice are not linked to cancer in humans, even with long-term exposure.

o The tumor promotion is only seen under certain specific experimental conditions.

o How benzoyl peroxide is used in these studies differs considerably from how it is used in the treatment of acne and very strong BPO concentrations are often used. Studies using commercial formulations of benzoyl peroxide do not generally find the same tumor promoting effect in mice.
8

• The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists benzoyl peroxide as a category III substance (safety uncertain). However, the FDA concerns were not so extreme as to lead them to recommend discontinuing the use of benzoyl peroxide medications. 9 The FDA has called for additional research on the carcinogenic potential of benzoyl peroxide. According to the FDA, this research is currently being conducted.

• The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which classifies substances based on carcinogenicity, has concluded that there is inadequate evidence for the carcinogenicity of benzoyl peroxide in humans and limited evidence in experimental animals for the carcinogenicity of benzoyl peroxide. The IARC does not categorize benzoyl peroxide as being carcinogenic; its carcinogenicity is labeled as being unknown. 10

References:

  1. Cartwright, R.A., Hughes, B.R., Cunliffe WJ (1988). Malignant melanoma, benzoyl peroxide and acne: a pilot epidemiological case-control investigation. Br J Dermatol, 118(2):239-42.
  2. Hogan, D.J., To, T., Wilson, E.R., Miller, A.B., Robson, D., Holfeld, K., Lane, P. (1991). A study of acne treatments as risk factors for skin cancer of the head and neck. Br J Dermatol. 125(4):343-8.
  3. Iverson, O.H. (1994). Benzoyl peroxide and possible skin cancer risks in mice and humans. In Skin Cancer: Mechanisms and Human Relevance, CrC Series in Dermatology, (Mukhtar, H., Ed.) pgs 13-20.
  4. Zbinden, G. (1988). Scientific opinion on the carcinogenic risk due to topical administration of benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Pharmacol Toxicol, 63: 307.
  5. Lidén, S., Lindelöf,B.,& Sparén, P. (1990). Is benzoyl peroxide carcinogenic? Br J Dermatol., 123(1):129-30.
  6. O'Connell, J.F., Klein-Szanto, A.J., DiGiovanni, D.M., Fries, J.W., Slaga, T.J. (1986). Enhanced malignant progression of mouse skin tumors by the free-radical generator benzoyl peroxide. Cancer Res. 46(6): 2863-2865.
  7. Kraus, A.L., Munro, I.C., Orr, J.C., Binder, R.L., LeBoeuf, R.A., Williams, G.M. (1995). Benzoyl peroxide: an integrated human safety assessment for carcinogenicity. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 21(1):87-107.
  8. Iverson, O.H. (1988). Skin tumorigenesis and carcinogenesis studies with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, ultraviolet light, benzoyl peroxide (Panoxyl gel 5%) and ointment gel. Carcinogenesis. 9(5):803-9.
  9. http://www.fda.gov/cder/otcmonographs/Acne...PR_19950217.pdf
  10. http://www.inchem.org/documents/iarc/vol71...nzoylperox.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So im new to the site, and have been doing some research on acne meds... and i found that benzoyl peroxide i was banned in Europe for several different reasons. it definitely worries me now (since i have been using bp for a while now, but not in abundance as suggested here)....what do u guys think? u can google it and see what u find for yourselves....but basically they're saying it isnt banned in America bc its cheap to produce and makes profit. here's just a few lines from the research i did:

"Acne preparations made of benzoyl peroxide may contain various other chemical ingredients. Glycolic acid is a photo sensitizer and may be toxic to gastrointestinal system, nervous system and kidneys. Triethanolamine can form carcinogenic nitrosamine compounds on the skin or in the body after absorption. It may also elicit immune reaction in form of allergic dermatitis or asthmatic attacks. Diisopropanolamine may release carcinogenic nitrosamine compounds."

they also say that it was found to cause cancer in rats after one year of use, and that it causes tumor growth.

I know we are all desperate for something that works, but my health is a priority as well. If it's banned in Europe, there must be some serious effects....

thanks for your responses....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm..thanks! helpful, but still seems a bit sketchy to me. for some reason no research on this seems definite. i'll look into it a bit further...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hmmm..thanks! helpful, but still seems a bit sketchy to me. for some reason no research on this seems definite. i'll look into it a bit further...

The research above in that article looked non-sketchy to me. Do look a bit further.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BP is a disgusting disgusting drug, and a cheap way to cause perminant damage to your skin.

I'm so glad europe is taking a step against it.

Seeing as I am sitting in my home in ENGLAND and I can see a nice, big bottle of BP as I write this, somehow I dont think that it is banned in Europe. In fact it is commercially available in the UK and can be supplied on prescription.

Do I sense someone who is either upset that BP didnt work for them or someone who has an alternative, less successful remedy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only sites saying BP is banned by the EU are astroturf sites financed by sleazy companies trying to sell you non-BP containing products, and sites like this one where someone is reading those and asking about it. Or for all we know, the people bringing this up, like Candace624 (who oddly posted the same question after people had already posted and hasn't posted anything else), are really just trolls. Hail to the warlocks, who vanquish the trolls! Sorry, having a little Charlie Sheen moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×