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alternativista

Zag Enzyme, Lectins, Digestive Tract And Clogged Pores

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alternativista, I have been recently diagnosed with graves disease and have often wondered what and how it contributes to my skin issues. Im very confused and overwhelmed at all the info you posted about the ZAG enzyme and its relationship to cell differentation.. Clogged pores plague me something awful. Its not just a normal clogged pore or two but they are embedded in my chin by the hundreds. I thought I had seb derm issues but have tried anti fungals and changing my diet drastically but my skin cell turnover will not regulate. I am on Armour thyroid medicine and take good supplement and dont know what else to try. What are your thoughts?

Doesn't graves cause an over active thyroid? In which case, why would you take thyroid hormones? Has anything changed since you started taking it?

I think what you should take away from this thread is to soak and cook your beans properly and ideally soak, sprout or ferment what grains you consume. And avoid or limit the most harmful. And eat your glyconutrients. There is that bit about colostrum obtaining zag and so it might be beneficial topically. There's another enzyme involved in dissolving the cell matrix and Its regulated by estrogens. and zag production is regulated by glucocorticoids which is what spironolactone is which may be a big factor in how its helpful in acne.

Did you try topical linoleic acid? It plays a vital role in the production of these enzymes and pretty much every thing else to do normal skin function. And your thyroid affects the lipid composition of your sebum.

Edited by alternativista

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This post on the benefits of nettles and nettle tea claim the lectins in nettles act like antibodies. Something to look into. Beneficial lectins. Sure there's a lot of research into lectins to treat cancer, but that doesn't mean they are good for you. Cancer treatments tend to be bad or you.

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/nettle-tea-health-benefits.html

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I have 'good' amount of lentil(lentil soup or dal) every day - almost always thrice a day(with breakfast, lunch & dinner).

i do it because i love them, they are so filling & also for the nutritional value - mainly the protein content!

my mum never soaks them.

but we first boil them and them add in spices, lil' oil and sometimes even veggies like carrots.

(i'll ask her to add onions &/or garlic everyday if she can)

is it okay if i have that much lentil soup through a day?

i ask this 'health wise' not just skin.

p.s i always have lentil soup with some white rice(which is my lunch & dinner staple along with good amount of veggies, fish/egg curry etc.)

i try to balance out my white rice(not much) with good about of protein, fibre, and as much as fat as i get from fish/egg/some oil used in cooking etc.

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I have 'good' amount of lentil(lentil soup or dal) every day - almost always thrice a day(with breakfast, lunch & dinner).

i do it because i love them, they are so filling & also for the nutritional value - mainly the protein content!

my mum never soaks them.

but we first boil them and them add in spices, lil' oil and sometimes even veggies like carrots.

(i'll ask her to add onions &/or garlic everyday if she can)

is it okay if i have that much lentil soup through a day?

i ask this 'health wise' not just skin.

p.s i always have lentil soup with some white rice(which is my lunch & dinner staple along with good amount of veggies, fish/egg curry etc.)

i try to balance out my white rice(not much) with good about of protein, fibre, and as much as fat as i get from fish/egg/some oil used in cooking etc.

I believe if you look back through the thread where there are the charts on the various lectins in various seeds, you'll find that substances that bind up the lectins in lentils are abundant in a variety of foods that are probably abundant in your diet. But I can't swear to that. I haven't memorized it all. But a rule of thumb is that the hardest lectins to destroy or bind up are those in the gluten grains and soy. And maybe peanuts, again, I don't remember on that.

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So phytic acid (aka inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is one of the forms of inositol and a source of myo inositol which has been found to improve insulin signaling and seratonin production. But of course we know it chelates minerals/metals, but that isn't entirely a bad thing. Many are toxic in excess. Some, like mercury, in any amounts. Phytic acid is used as a chelating substance for uranium. It's also used in soil to remove contaminants such as uranium.

So what I'm trying to determine is if sprouting my buckwheat frees up the inositols.

Be careful with sprouting buckwheat. I've added a lot of buckwheat to my diet recently, for unrelated reasons. The buckwheat *plant* contains large amounts of fagopyrin (a structurally interesting compound related to hypericin from St. Johns wort). The compound is phototoxic, and orally bioavailable.. it builds up in your skin after eating it. All the human case studies I've read (easily searched for on the net) are of people juicing or otherwise consuming fresh buckwheat greens or shoots. On exposure to sunlight, fagopyrin absorbs photons and produces singlet oxygen and other reactive radicals, which then go on to damage surrounding tissues. In people who have been regularly consuming fresh buckwheat, this results in extreme sensitivity to light, swelling and itching, and being easily sunburned... this evolves into neurological symptoms, dizziness and nausea.

The buckwheat *seeds* themselves contain only trace amounts of fagopyrin, and thus whole buckwheat, kasha, and buckwheat flour are perfectly fine. And of course, they've been eaten without problems for thousands of years. I haven't found any references to sprouting buckwheat as a traditional practice, though. Kasha is invariably made from buckwheat groats that are toasted/roasted and then boiled. Soba is made from unsprouted buckwheat flour.

I've been toying with just soaking overnight. I doubt this could realistically cause a problem if only eaten occasionally. But there has to be a clear advantage to weigh against the risk. Unfortunately, I've been unable to find any reports on at what point in the life of the plant fagopyrin is produced, or the concentration of fagopyrin in sprouts. Shoots are very high in fagopyrins though, so it stands to reason that production begins with germination of the seed.

Anyway, just wanted to let people know. I was quite surprised to learn of this.

Edited by greentiger87

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So phytic acid (aka inositol hexaphosphate, IP6) is one of the forms of inositol and a source of myo inositol which has been found to improve insulin signaling and seratonin production. But of course we know it chelates minerals/metals, but that isn't entirely a bad thing. Many are toxic in excess. Some, like mercury, in any amounts. Phytic acid is used as a chelating substance for uranium. It's also used in soil to remove contaminants such as uranium.

So what I'm trying to determine is if sprouting my buckwheat frees up the inositols.

Be careful with sprouting buckwheat. I've added a lot of buckwheat to my diet recently, for unrelated reasons. The buckwheat *plant* contains large amounts of fagopyrin (a structurally interesting compound related to hypericin from St. Johns wort). The compound is phototoxic, and orally bioavailable.. it builds up in your skin after eating it. All the human case studies I've read (easily searched for on the net) are of people juicing or otherwise consuming fresh buckwheat greens or shoots. On exposure to sunlight, fagopyrin absorbs photons and produces singlet oxygen and other reactive radicals, which then go on to damage surrounding tissues. In people who have been regularly consuming fresh buckwheat, this results in extreme sensitivity to light, swelling and itching, and being easily sunburned... this evolves into neurological symptoms, dizziness and nausea.

The buckwheat *seeds* themselves contain only trace amounts of fagopyrin, and thus whole buckwheat, kasha, and buckwheat flour are perfectly fine. And of course, they've been eaten without problems for thousands of years. I haven't found any references to sprouting buckwheat as a traditional practice, though. Kasha is invariably made from buckwheat groats that are toasted/roasted and then boiled. Soba is made from unsprouted buckwheat flour.

I've been toying with just soaking overnight. I doubt this could realistically cause a problem if only eaten occasionally. But there has to be a clear advantage to weigh against the risk. Unfortunately, I've been unable to find any reports on at what point in the life of the plant fagopyrin is produced, or the concentration of fagopyrin in sprouts. Shoots are very high in fagopyrins though, so it stands to reason that production begins with germination of the seed.

Anyway, just wanted to let people know. I was quite surprised to learn of this.

Or with the growth of one foliage to be exposed to the sun. I only sprout until the root starts forming. I haven't noticed any increase in photo sensitivity and I've Been oing this for a whole and been in the sun a lot lately. I was interested in seeing what growing buckwheat and buckwheat greens was like though. I have a few plants in my garden.

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