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My daughter is 11 years old and has acne on her forehead. A work colleague of my hubby's mentioned that his teens had tried everything on the market for their acne and nothing worked. He has spent a fortune on products, finally he took the kids to see a naturopath who recommended vitamin E.

Has anyone else had success with Vitamin E - how much would you take internally and do you apply it topically?

I look forward to any help you all have to offer,

Thanks,

KathMaree

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for internal,

you can take a vitamin e tablet. doesn't cost that much

and for external. there are vitamin e oil that aren't comedogenic that can be applied topically.

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This is from here http://mindandmuscle.net/node/576

2. High Gamma Vitamin E

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is actually a combination of eight different isomers, four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. Unfortunately most of the Vitamin E you’ll find is a piss-poor form called dl-alpha tocopherol. This is NOT what you want. In fact, this particular form does a good job of lowering gamma tocopherol in your body, which is like pulling cops off a crime scene.

Aside from dominating the Vitamin E shelf space at health food stores, the synthetic dl-alpha form can also be found playing a starring role in research sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry attempting to scare you silly while concurrently providing warm fuzzy comforting research about the undying sexiness of statins.

What you DO want is a natural form of Vitamin E, high in the aforementioned gamma tocopherols (the kind found in foods). Multiple studies have shown that patients with advanced states of cardiovascular disease show a reduction in plasma gamma tocopherol, yet they show normal levels of alpha tocopherol.

Benefits of High gamma natural Vitamin E:

* Fat soluble anti-oxidant

* Promotes skin health

* Controls inflammation

* Controls reactive nitrogen oxides (accumulation promotes several disease states)

* Counteracts damaging effects of mercury from diet

* COX-2 inhibition

* Reduction of LDL cholesterol oxidation (high LDL causes its problems when it oxidizes)

* Reduction of platelet aggregation and clot formation

Dosage: A little goes a long way. Take 400IU once per day with a meal containing fat, away from weight training.

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Personally, having read a lot of Vitamin E research in the last 5 years, I would not give Vitamin E to a kid. The evidence for it helping acne is pretty poor. Vitamin E supplementation keeps showing up somewhat correlated with Bad Things (most disturbingly for someone handing pills to a daughter, breast cancer -- though I believe that unexpected result has yet to be reproduced). If I had to guess, I would predict the bad effects of Vitamin E come from it interfering with Vitamin K absorption, and Vitamin E can help or hurt depending on other factors. As an adult, I take a small dose of Vitamin E (red palm oil) along with 3 forms of Vitamin K. It is almost certainly not a big risk for most people to take Vitamin E, but again, with little hope for a big impact on acne, why take even a small risk with a kid?

IMHO only :D

Lessee, 11 years old. I wonder if the total # of hours of sleep, the regularity of the bedtime hour, and the total # of hours of retinal outdoor light exposure have all been decreasing for her during the lead up to acne?

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i have had good results with red palm oil, it is abundant in vitamins E and A and great for the skin. try to get your vitamins from natural sources. Google for Paul Chek he claims isolated, synthetic vitamins can cause far greater trouble down the road.

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This is from here http://mindandmuscle.net/node/576

Vitamin E is actually a combination of eight different isomers, four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. Unfortunately most of the Vitamin E you’ll find is a piss-poor form called dl-alpha tocopherol. This is NOT what you want. In fact, this particular form does a good job of lowering gamma tocopherol in your body, which is like pulling cops off a crime scene.

Let it be known that Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw (of Life Extension fame) recommend dl-alpha tocopherol acetate, and they've almost certainly researched this issue far more than anybody else, including the people who wrote the article at that site.

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As far as my knowledge goes...

i remember learning somewhere that d1-alpha tocopherol acetate is the one you want to avoid and d-alpha tocopherol acetate is the one you want.

The difference is that "1" they slip into the beginning of the name.

Unfortunately i don't remember why, or any reasoning behind this.

Do a little more research about it.

Just my $.02

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Let it be known that Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw (of Life Extension fame) recommend dl-alpha tocopherol acetate, and they've almost certainly researched this issue far more than anybody else, including the people who wrote the article at that site.

I read a study citing that administration of dl-allhpa tocopherol alone can be very dangerous and even cause death if administered long enough. From all the research I have read you need something high in Gamma or a full spectrum Vitamin E.

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As far as my knowledge goes...

i remember learning somewhere that d1-alpha tocopherol acetate is the one you want to avoid and d-alpha tocopherol acetate is the one you want.

The difference is that "1" they slip into the beginning of the name.

Unfortunately i don't remember why, or any reasoning behind this.

Do a little more research about it.

It's not "d1", it's "dl", as in DL. The "d" stands for "dextro" (which means "right" or "right-handed"), and the "l" stand for "levo" (which means "left" or "left-handed"). It refers to the two different ways the tocopherol molecule can be molecularly oriented. The natural way that it's produced by plant cells is in the "d" form ("dextro" or "right"). When you synthesize it in a laboratory, it comes out as an equal 50/50 mixture of the two forms, so it's called "dl-tocopherol".

A so-called "unit" of vitamin E is a measure of its biological activity, so it doesn't make any difference whether you take it in the form of d-tocopherol or dl-docopherol. A capsule containing 200 IU of vitamin E has the same biological activity, regardless of which form it's in ("natural" or synthetic).

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I read a study citing that administration of dl-allhpa tocopherol alone can be very dangerous and even cause death if administered long enough. From all the research I have read you need something high in Gamma or a full spectrum Vitamin E.

LOL! I've been taking synthetic dl-alpha tocopherol acetate for most of my life, and I'm a LOT older than the rest of you! Of course, if I happen to topple-over dead in the middle of this post, I guess you'll know what happened to me! :angel:

For an excellent discussion of this important issue, read "Natural Versus Synthetic Vitamin E: A Reply to Henkel Corporation", which takes up an entire chapter in the book The Life Extension Companion, the sequel to Life Extension, by Durk Pearson & Sandy Shaw. After the success of their first book, Henkel Corporation (a company that produces "natural" vitamin E) wrote to Pearson & Shaw, chastising them for recommending the synthetic version of vitamin E in their first book. In their reply to Henkel, Pearson & Shaw completely dismantle Henkel point-by-point, citing the scientific literature. It's very informative, and I feel reading that one chapter alone is worth the price of the book! :)

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