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Zmffy

Just a reminder about carbohydrates

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It's basically accepted amongst us that lots of sugar will cause a huge increase in sebum production and cause pimples, but many people are unsure as to what counts as sugar. I recently discovered that all carbohydrates count as sugar, as all of them are glycemic (they raise your blood glucose levels). That means that enough whole wheat bread has the exact same effect on your acne as skittles! So does sweet potato, corn, beans, rice, etc. I finished my milk thistle detox and about a week later I started getting pimples again and freaked. I had no idea why I was still getting pimples even after I detoxed my liver. I examined my diet and discovered one thing. I had been eating a bowl of shredded wheat cereal with rice milk every day. http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/breakfast-cereals/1750/2 . Shredded wheat has no added sugar so I figured that it was perfectly fine, and I would have about 1 and a half cups a day and half a cup of rice milk. Rice milk also has carbohydrates so I estimate that the glycemic load of that bowl of cereal was equal to about 40! That's the equivalent of 2 and a half ozs of skittles. So I started on a low glycemic diet and easy as that, I haven't had a pimple in a week. I've even been eating fatty foods and vegetable oil with lots of omega 6 and saturated fat that before would make my acne way worse, and I'm still clear.

In summary, the carbs in wheat and all grains count as sugar. If your acne is sensitive to sugar, research the Glycemic Index and get on a low glycemic diet.

Best of luck!

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Skittles are a lot worse than wheat as far as sebum production, but I get what you are saying. That being said I don't believe you have to avoid all carbohydrates, just those that are refined or have high GL.

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In summary, the carbs in wheat and all grains count as sugar. If your acne is sensitive to sugar, research the Glycemic Index and get on a low glycemic diet.

None of this is rocket science, of course. No matter how "complex" a carbohydrate is in its original starting condition, it still has to be digested down into glucose (a simple sugar) by enzymes before it can be absorbed into the bloodstream.

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Skittles are a lot worse than wheat as far as sebum production, but I get what you are saying. That being said I don't believe you have to avoid all carbohydrates, just those that are refined or have high GL.

What I was trying to say is that whole wheat bread is highly glycemic. Perhaps not as highly glycemic as the equivalent amount of calories in skittles. But it can be significant if you eat enough of it. And enough of it is surprisingly little. What matters isn't the glycemic index of what you're eating but the glycemic load. Check the glycemic load of any unrefined "low sugar" carbohydrate and you'll see that a cup or two is all you need to sense your blood glucose through the roof in the exact same way that candy does.

For example, 100 grams of home-made whole wheat bread has a glycemic load of 27 http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/baked-products/4878/2 which is the equivalent of more than half, less than 3/4 of a package of skittles http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/sweets/5611/2

To the post above me. Yes I know it isn't rocket science. But I was misinformed about just how much even plain whole wheat bread can impact sebum production so I figured that a lot of people, like the guy I just responded to would be equally ignorant, stating things like you don't have to worry about unrefined carbs, etc. I would eat 2 cups of shredded wheat cereal (no sugar added!) at a time thinking that I wasn't impacting my sebum production because it was whole wheat and didn't have added sugar.

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But remember, it's the GL of the meal that matters. When you combine carbs with protein, fiber and fats, it lowers the glycemic impact, provided you don't over eat.

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Ah that is true. I'm glad you added that. Although other food, especially low GI vegetables reduces the impact I definitely don't look at eating my bread with a salad as an excuse to go overboard with it. It's just another thing working in your favor.

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I cut out most carbs from my diet for a really long time only to realise that if anything carbs, like pasta, are extremely helpful with MY acne. If your acne is hormonal then MAYBE it would be wiser to cut down... but to stray from carbs is talking crazy. Pasta is a good source of B vitamins, iron and niacin. It is very low in sodium and is cholesterol free. Let's not forget about good ol' fiber as well.

Most importantly: Pasta has a low Glycemic Index (GI)

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Most importantly: Pasta has a low Glycemic Index (GI)

Pasta? PASTA?! Pasta certainly isn't something I'd ever expect to have a low GI, unless it were artificially supplemented with certain other food elements like protein, fat, or soluble fiber. One normally think of pasta as being an almost purely carbohydrate food, which certainly doesn't suggest a low GI! :think:

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any carb in excess is obviously not good for acne.

However, eating whole grains (in moderation) are less likely to cause tons of acne. Why? Because it takes the body longer to break it down and digest it. Therefore, the insulin doesn't get triggered into massive surges like when eating a piece of white bread or...skittles.

A lot of whole grain foods also contain fiber, which doesn't get digested, but simply gets purged through the body.

For instance, for two months straight, I ate nothing but oatmeal (non-instant) and it had absolutely no affect on my skin, probably because the carbs are mostly fiber.

I also used to eat a piece of whole wheat bread every day or every other day and it didn't adversely affect my acne either. That doesn't mean 'eat tons of whole grain' or anything, but that in moderation, whole grains aren't likely to severely cause any problems. Now unless you're allergic to something in the whole grains foods, then small portions shouldn't cause a lot of issues.

Now potatoes...pssh. I barely have to look at the things and my skin goes nuts. XP

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With pasta, the GI increases with how long you cook it supposedly. So try not to overcook. Choose a thin variety so it will cook through faster.

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However, eating whole grains (in moderation) are less likely to cause tons of acne. Why? Because it takes the body longer to break it down and digest it. Therefore, the insulin doesn't get triggered into massive surges like when eating a piece of white bread or...skittles.

I doubt that that's the correct explanation, because I don't think there's any significant difference in the amount of time it takes the body to "break down" wheat grains. In fact, one list of glycemic indexes I've seen actually had a slightly higher GI for whole wheat bread than for white bread. I would imagine that the main reason for that is probably that the fiber in wheat is almost exclusively the insoluble type, which has no effect on the absorption of glucose.

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barley and rye is the food from the gods.

Cereal Grains GI

Pearl barley Low 25

Rye Low 34

Wheat kernels Low 41

Rice, instant Low 46

Rice, parboiled Low 48

Barley, cracked Low 50

Rice, brown Medium 55

Rice, wild Medium 57

Rice, white Medium 58

Barley, flakes Medium 66

Taco Shell Medium 68

Millet High 71

CEREAL GRAINS GI/serving size per grams/GL per serving

Barley

487 Barley kernels, high-amylose (hull-less) boiled in 20 150 8

water for 25 min (kernel:water = 1:2.5) (Sweden)

488 Barley kernels, waxy (hull-less), boiled in water 22 150 9

for 25 min (kernel:water = 1:2.5) (Sweden)

489 Barley kernels, boiled in water for 25 min 25 150 10

(kernel:water = 1:2) (Sweden)

490 Barley kernels, high-amylose (covered), boiled in 26 150 11

water for 25 min (kernel:water = 1:2) (Sweden)

491 Barley, pot, boiled in salted water 20 min 25±2 150 11

(Goudas Food Products, Concord, Canada)

492 Barley, pearled, boiled 60 min (UK) 35±4 150 15

493 Barley, pot, boiled (Goudas Food Products, Canada) 35±4 150 15

494 Barley, pot, boiled 20 min (Goudas Food 37 150 16

Products, Canada)

mean of eight studies 28±2 150 12

495 Barley (Hordeum vulgare) (India) 48 150 20

496 Barley, rolled (Australia) 66±5 50 (dry) 25

497 Buckwheat groats, hydrothermally treated, 45 150 13

dehusked, boiled 12 min (Sweden)

seems our bodies are always trying to stablize blood sugar levels so the brain has a constant uninterupted fuel. Barley also has a good amount of both insoluble and soluble fiber to maintain the flora in the large bowel as well.

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Caloric restriction will always reduce the growth-factor-related issues of the human body, including acne. You’ll probably see the same thing with Casein in milk, which is about the most nutritious stuff you can ingest. Eat less, live less, sweat less, lift less, etc.

Eating smaller meals more frequently throughout the day will have much the same effect as most of this stuff above, without the side-effects… assuming you brush and floss enough. Dentists hate the “grazing dietâ€, but it’s good for everything other than your teeth.

Most stuff with a low GI/GL will cause a lot of gas. Remember that.

Finally, the clearest trend in everything you're talking about (and some of your signatures) is quite obvious to me: food allergies and related mal-absorption issues. This is consistent with some of the other recent threads I've seen on here. Go back up and look through the thread. That’s not a subtle pattern.

Makes sense. Because there are people with oily skin or who use a lot of moisturizer who do not get acne and have no more stronger immune systems (from a clinical standpoint you can test for, at least) than you or I. Why don't they get acne? Why don't tribes people in Papua New Guinea get it? A lot of this pro-Atkins type stuff wants to say it's GI/GL and carb-related, and many of the researchers doing the studies want to push their conclusions in that direction because of bias.

But if you really look at the meta-analysis they do and avoid the junk science, not to mention just look at the posts in this thread, it seems to come down much more to indigenous diet versus non-indigenous diet, being out in the fresh air, getting enough sunshine uniformly throughout the day & weeks (not all at once at high doses), having a regular sleep pattern, and not using weird skin products on your face that go tingle or anything else.

One group of indigenous peoples eats a lot of Foods A. Another group eats a lot of Foods B. Swap the foods, and they get problems. Give them *our* new, strange foods, they have problems. We eat their foods, we have problems. Hell, we eat some of *our* new foods we’re not really adapted to and we have problems!

If this indeed is a primary cause of the root inflammation that’s leading to the Acne Positive Feedback Cycle, then all the antibiotics, peroxides, and acids in the world won’t solve the problem. They are probably necessary, but won’t break it permanently. You either have to change that root cause, reprogram your skin cells to produce way less oil permanently, or cross your fingers and hope you grow out of it soon.

Have I missed anything?

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Wheat is riddled with plenty of problems besides just high carbs. It also has gluten which irritates your stomach and intestinal lining. Not to mention many people can't digest gluten fully either, even if they don't have celiac's disease. Personally I try to stay away from any and all bread and candy products.

However if you have ACV before or after a meal, it's lowers the effect on blood glucose. As alternavista said, fat does too. However, I wouldn't recommend eating a high carb dish with protein and fat often because one of the easiest ways to raise your cholesterol is combining carbs with something that has cholesterol (and foods that have both meaningful values of protein and fat generally have cholesterol.)

Edited by chunkylard

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