Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Guest jessmc

Jojoba oil for oily skin.

Recommended Posts

Guest jessmc

*edit: I re-wrote my bog to reflect my personal experience with jojoba oil as I am clearly not an expert on skin "types." Hopefully my thoughts are clear and they will be beneficial to some of you. :wavey:

blog

Edited by jessmc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just wrote this blog about "oily skin". Check it out, I will be very happy if you do. :)

Go here.

jessmc

Good post! I was a bit skeptical about reading any further after I read the title of this thread... Being somebody with very oily skin I thought "of course there is such a thing as oily skin!?" ...After reading your blog it does make sense!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
There are countless misconceptions in there but I shall leave with the following line of thought. In theory, any oil would be competent enough to deceive sebaceous glands and replace sebum! As far its practicality, I am piloting olive oil tonight with great anticipation. =]

There are oils that are closer to sebum in composition. Jojoba oil being one of those. Let me know what effect the olive oil has. Please point out anything else you believe to be a misconception, I am not out to sound like a propagandist. Just trying to explain what I have found, it would help if I was a scientist or something. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting..but what if it breaks me out?

I once used Olay's lotion and it made my skin so dry that within an hour there is literally oil pooling up at the corners of my nose..I've never see such a disgusting sight before. And my skin felt really tight. That's when I knew I had dehydrated skin..but I still thought my skin was oily. Oily but dehydrated. And when I moved onto the cream version of that range, my skin didn't feel tight anymore, however it's still greasy, however not as greasy as when I used the lotion.

Edit: I just read up on Makeupalley.com on Jojoba oil from the Desert Essence brand. I filtered the reviews so that I can read the reviews from people with "very oily skin". Most of them gave it really good ratings! This encourages me to go try it out. I would love to test out the oil theory..should I start with just applying it on the t-zones? I'm very fearful about breaking out..I've read about this before, on people putting lotus oil/jojoba oil on the skin and breaking out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is such thing as oily skin. That's how dermatologists classify skin types that are unbalanced. Combination, dry, oily, or normal. No I don't have "oily skin" but my skin does produce a lot of oil. It's how dermatologists classify someones skin.

But anyways, I tried jojoba oil for 2 weeks last year (I put it only in one area, my chin) and I got a big clump of pimples there. Before, I had never gotten acne on my chin. So this didn't work for me..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
There is such thing as oily skin. That's how dermatologists classify skin types that are unbalanced. Combination, dry, oily, or normal. No I don't have "oily skin" but my skin does produce a lot of oil. It's how dermatologists classify someones skin.

But anyways, I tried jojoba oil for 2 weeks last year (I put it only in one area, my chin) and I got a big clump of pimples there. Before, I had never gotten acne on my chin. So this didn't work for me..

yes i understand, but there is a misconception among some people (including me at one point) that having an oily skin type is something you are born with. i guess if you are fine with unbalanced skin then go ahead and keep calling your skin oily. a better term like you said would be to call it unbalanced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
Interesting..but what if it breaks me out?

I once used Olay's lotion and it made my skin so dry that within an hour there is literally oil pooling up at the corners of my nose..I've never see such a disgusting sight before. And my skin felt really tight. That's when I knew I had dehydrated skin..but I still thought my skin was oily. Oily but dehydrated. And when I moved onto the cream version of that range, my skin didn't feel tight anymore, however it's still greasy, however not as greasy as when I used the lotion.

Edit: I just read up on Makeupalley.com on Jojoba oil from the Desert Essence brand. I filtered the reviews so that I can read the reviews from people with "very oily skin". Most of them gave it really good ratings! This encourages me to go try it out. I would love to test out the oil theory..should I start with just applying it on the t-zones? I'm very fearful about breaking out..I've read about this before, on people putting lotus oil/jojoba oil on the skin and breaking out.

i hope you do try it. let me know how it goes. i suggest putting it on your whole face at night instead of lotion and then if you like it put a couple drops in your lotion during the day. i was worried about breaking out too, but the jojoba oil unclogs your pores so you can't really breakout if there is nothing in your pores to get infected.

all of the good reviews convinced me to try it and i'm glad i did.

cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
With regards to your Blog... Oily skin is very dissimilar in nature to the framework of a dry skin. As bryan has so willfully stated on numerous occasions, there is no association between the two... at least, one has yet to be predicated. One must understand that an overactive sebaceous gland is indeed natural seeing it is the body's natural defense much like the body increases ones heart-rate. Its sole purpose being an exemplary shield for the skin by rationing a safeguard from the environment. Since the rather moderately naive operation of our body, one can subsequently exploit it unchallenged to some degree... it is in essence how medicine is practiced.

As expected, olive oil did administer an amiable glow. Initial regards were the smoothness encountered throughout which prolonged in duration of multitude hours. Sebum secretion was indeed minimal but did supersede. It is too early to conceive an initial analysis as more verification would be required throughout the week all the while amplifying the duration process.

my blog is about "oily skin" not dry skin. as far as "dry skin" (people without overactive sebaceous glands), I do not know much about it.

all I know is that if your skin is dry and you are the type of person whose body has the predisposition for overactive sebaceous glands then you will have "oily skin" as a result.

smoothness for prolonged hours is good, no? i wonder how the reviews for olive oil compare to the jojoba oil?

the way you speak like a scientist is so way over my head but very endearing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
why dont you dab real sebum on your skin instead of jojoba oil? just curious.

are you going to send me some of your sebum?

as bizarre as it sounds using the jojoba oil dissolves the sebum that is clogged in your pores from excess sebum production in the first place.

i have 10 years of clogged pores to clear up before my natural sebum can even penetrate my own skin. obvs using my own sebum to disolve the sebum that is clogging my pores in the first place is not going to work otherwise i wouldn't have this problem to begin with.

ciao. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
all I know is that if your skin is dry and you are the type of person whose body has the predisposition for overactive sebaceous glands then you will have "oily skin" as a result.

That sentence is rather ambiguous, although I can probably guess correctly what you mean. When people use the word "dry" in this context, I wish they would state explicitly whether they mean "dry" from a lack of moisture (water), or "dry" from a lack of oil (sebum), or both. Or neither.

I'm going to assume that what you meant by that is that if you have moisture-dry skin, you will have oily skin as a result. But I don't know of any scientific evidence to support that claim, and I bet you don't either. I've previously posted a reference to a study that found no correlation between the occurrence or severity of moisture-dry skin and levels of sebum production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
all I know is that if your skin is dry and you are the type of person whose body has the predisposition for overactive sebaceous glands then you will have "oily skin" as a result.

That sentence is rather ambiguous, although I can probably guess correctly what you mean. When people use the word "dry" in this context, I wish they would state explicitly whether they mean "dry" from a lack of moisture (water), or "dry" from a lack of oil (sebum), or both. Or neither.

I'm going to assume that what you meant by that is that if you have moisture-dry skin, you will have oily skin as a result. But I don't know of any scientific evidence to support that claim, and I bet you don't either. I've previously posted a reference to a study that found no correlation between the occurrence or severity of moisture-dry skin and levels of sebum production.

I don't know how to say it without sounding ambiguous. I only know that my skin was dry from using topical acne medication which in turn caused it to be very "oily". The oil seemed to just pool at the surface of my skin constantly throughout the day but never actually absorbed into my skin. If you know what type of "dryness" that is please chime in. Honestly i could care less about most scientific evidence since studies of this nature tend to be designed in a manner to produce the results the scientists so desire. I am going on personal experience and the hundreds of good reviews I have read.

I appreciate your feedback.

Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
It's true that no one is "born" with oily skin, but there is such a thing as oily skin. When I used various oils on my face, my perception of the amount of oil on my face changed, making me think for a while that it was "balanced." Not so. It's just that there's not that dramatic a change from "pleasantly oily" to "oily," like there is when you use soaps/cleansers, i.e. from "varnished" to "oily."

May I ask, how long have you been on Ortho Tri Cyclen so far?

well maybe i should change the title. haha. i was just trying to explain that excess oil is caused by dry skin. but i get what you are saying, now that my skin is moisturized i don't notice the oil as much because it feels pleasant and not gross. although i used to actually have to soak up the oil off my face and now i don't have to do that at all. it's just not there anymore and i feel moisturized.

i have been on ortho for over 2 years. that is also approx. the amount of time that i have been the most cleared up.

peace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know how to say it without sounding ambiguous.

It's easy: you say "oil-dry" or "moisture-dry".

I only know that my skin was dry from using topical acne medication which in turn caused it to be very "oily".

Again, please specify what you mean by "dry". Do you mean oil-dry or moisture-dry?

The oil seemed to just pool at the surface of my skin constantly throughout the day but never actually absorbed into my skin.

It was probably some effect of the medication itself. The level of moisture in the skin has no effect on sebum production. At least, I've never seen any evidence to support that idea.

Honestly i could care less about most scientific evidence since studies of this nature tend to be designed in a manner to produce the results the scientists so desire. I am going on personal experience and the hundreds of good reviews I have read.

That's a very naive thing to say. Scientists design their experiments, taking into consideration things which go completely over the heads of the average user. You should put FAR more weight on what doctors and scientists say, compared to things from casual posters on Internet forums.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i was just trying to explain that excess oil is caused by dry skin.

Excess sebum isn't caused by dry skin, regardless of which kind of "dry" you mean.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest jessmc
i was just trying to explain that excess oil is caused by dry skin.

Excess sebum isn't caused by dry skin, regardless of which kind of "dry" you mean.

holy god you are bitter. i have no idea what the difference between oil-dry and moisture dry is. and yes scientists who work for large corporations absolutely design their studies around the results they wish to achieve. the dollar is the bottom line. whatever consumers will buy is what they make, has nothing to do with whether they are actually good for them.

and yes some scientists are doing good work, probably that ones that aren't paid enough.

i am going to change the title. haha. maybe to "good scientists aren't paid enough."

ciao.

would jojoba interfere w/ AHA+ in any way?

not really sure. i decided to try jojoba because i didn't want to use AHA. sorry i don't know the answer. hope you find out.

Well, the title is definitely catchy. You're a charitable correspondent, but I think I came off trying to step all over your opinion on this. That's not my intent. The thing is, about eight months ago I investigated jojoba, with extremely dehydrated, oil-oozing skin as my canvas. Turns out jojoba oil can cause contact dermatitis in people with skin sensitivity, i.e. those who have issues with chronic skin dehydration, oily or not, so I don't think it's a solid answer. I ended up figuring out something else that cured my dehydration (which I can safely say after using it for six months and never using moisturizer), but I'm still oily as ever.

you can try olive oil. apple cider vinegar toner also helps with excess oil. and i also heard that taking flax or fish oil does the same thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using Jojoba Oil for the past ~2 months. Did not solve the oily skin issue. It does, however, moisturize very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excess sebum isn't caused by dry skin, regardless of which kind of "dry" you mean.

holy god you are bitter.

I'm not bitter at all. What I am is persistent. I'll keep explaining to you how sebaceous glands work until you understand it and believe it.

i have no idea what the difference between oil-dry and moisture dry is.

I've already explained that to you. Oil-dry means your skin is free of oil (sebum). Moisture-dry means that it's free of moisture (water).

and yes scientists who work for large corporations absolutely design their studies around the results they wish to achieve. the dollar is the bottom line. whatever consumers will buy is what they make, has nothing to do with whether they are actually good for them.

I don't care nearly as much about the doctors and scientists who work for large companies and have a vested interest in selling certain products. I'm FAR more interested in those altruistic doctors and scientists whose main purpose is to treat patients and educate the public on serious medical issues. THOSE are the ones I mainly quote in all my posts. You would be well advised to listen to what they say, instead of believing your own incorrect layman ideas about how sebaceous glands supposedly work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, I don't understand what you are trying to say.

So, if you have oily skin- you really have dry skin?

Well that doesn't make sense to me, because what about those people with dry skin. If they had dry skin wouldn't their skin produce more oil, too?

But there skin isn't oily. . . so would those people really have oily skin, but their skin makes up for it by making it more dry?

So what would happen is eventually the people with "oily" skin that is actually dry will become "oily" and magically transform to "dry" skin???

It's confusing me, because to me it sounds like it's opposite day. And how is one suppose to make their skin less "oily" if it's really dry? What if they moisturize for years and the skin is still "oily", what happens then? "dry" skin can always not be dry with proper moisturizing unless you have a condition of some sort.

Sorry for all the questions, but this is really confusing me. Like I said before, it sounds to me like it's opposite day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Honestly, I don't understand what you are trying to say.

To whom are you speaking?

So, if you have oily skin- you really have dry skin?

Well that doesn't make sense to me, because what about those people with dry skin. If they had dry skin wouldn't their skin produce more oil, too?

People on these forums talk about that issue ad nauseum, but there's no scientific evidence at all that I'm aware of that dehydrated skin causes an increase in sebum production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×