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CelloIsLove

Big Discovery: The Lymphatic Drainage System

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*Disclaimer* I WILL NOT SAY THIS IS A CURE, or that it has helped my acne. My acne's gotten a little better in the past few days, but that could be because of many other things. Th point of this post is to just put the information out there, and not to advertise a cure. This if for people to consider and discuss. And that is all :D

Doing some research about Castor Oil, I ran across something about the lymphatic drainage system. Apparently Castor oil helps stimulate it. This is worth reading through, because I'm almost positive this is a big part on my own acne, and I will explain why later.

Functions of the Lymphatic System

The lymphatic works in close cooperation with other body systems to perform this important functions:

* It works with the circulatory system to deliver nutrients, oxygen, and hormones to the cells that make up the tissues of the body.

* It removes excess fluid, waste, debris, dead blood cells, pathogens, cancer cells, and toxins from these cells and the spaces between them.

* It collects protein molecules created within the cells and return these proteins must be returned to the bloodstream. Because the molecules are too large to through the capillaries of the circulatory system, they must be transported through the lymphatic system until they return to the bloodstream.

* When lymphedema affects an area the lymph cannot drain properly and it becomes stagnant within this protein-rich fluid. For this reason, lymphedema affected tissues are prone to infections.

* It aids the immune system in destroying pathogens and filtering waste so that the lymph can be safely returned to the circulatory system.

The Origin of Lymph

Lymph originates as plasma, which is the fluid portion of blood. The aterial blood flows slows as it moves through through a capillary bed (see figure above). This slowing allows some plasma to leave the arterioles, flow into the tissues and become tissue fluid.

* Also known as intercellular fluid or interstitial fluid it delivers to the cells the nutrients, oxygen, and hormones that were transported by this fluid.

* When this fluid leaves the cells, it collects cellular waste products.

* Approximately 90 percent of this tissue fluid flows into the venules. Here it enters the venous circulation as plasma.

* The remaining 10 percent of the fluid is now known as lymph.

Lymphatic Flow

The lymphatic system does not have a pump to help it flow through out the body. Therefore this system is designed so that lymph can only flow upward through the body from the extremities (feet and hands) toward the neck where the lymph enters the subclavian veins and once again becomes plasma in the bloodstream.

Lymphatic Capillaries

In order to leave the tissues, the lymph must enter the lymphatic system through specialized lymphatic capillaries which are located just under the skin. These begin as blind-ended tubes that are only a single cell in thickness. These cells are arranged in a slightly overlapping pattern, much like the shingles on a roof. As shown in this animation below, pressure from the fluid surrounding the capillary forces these cells to separate for a moment to allow lymph to enter the capillary. Then the cells of the wall close together. This does not allow the lymph to leave the capillary but forces it to move forward. (This animation was provided courtesy of John Ross, Senior Teaching Fellow, University of Luton, UK.)

Lymphatic Vessels

The lymphatic capillaries gradually join together to form a mesh-like network of tubes that are located deeper in the body. As they become larger, these structures are known as lymphatic vessels.

* Deeper within the body the lymphatic vessels become progressively larger and are located near major veins.

* Like veins, the lymphatic vessels have valves to prevent any backward flow.

* Angions are the segments created by the space between two sets of valves.

* Smooth muscles in the walls of the lymphatic vessels cause the angions to contract sequentially to aid the flow of lymph toward the thoracic region.

Lymph Nodes

Lymph must be filtered before it returns to the circulatory system and this is the function of the lymph nodes. There are between 600-700 lymph nodes present in the average human. Although these nodes can increase or decrease in size thoughout life,any nodes that have been damaged or destroyed, do not regenerate.

Why This Information is so Important

* Damage disturbs the flow. When lymphatic tissues or lymph nodes have been damaged, destroyed or removed, lymph cannot drain normally from the affected area. When this happens excess lymph accumulates and results in the swelling that is characteristic of lymphedema

* Drainage areas. The treatment of lymphedema is based on the natural structures and the flow of lymph. The affected drainage area determines the pattern of the manual lymph drainage (MLD) and for self-massage. Although lymph does not normally cross from one area to another, MLD stimulates the flow from one area to another. It also encourages the formation of new lymph drainage pathways.

* MLD treatment and self-massage begin by stimulating the area near the terminus and the larger lymphatic vessels. This stimulates the flow of lymph that is already in the system and frees space for the flow of the lymph that is going to enter the capillaries during the treatment. See How Lymphedema is Treated.

* MLD treatment continues as a gentle massage technique to stimulate the movement of the excess lymph in affected tissues. The rhythmic, light strokes of MLD provide just the right pressure to encourage this excess lymph to flow into the lymph capillaries.

* The compression garments, aids, and/or bandages that are worn between treatments help control swelling by providing pressure that is needed to encourage the flow of lymph into the capillaries. See Compression Treatment of Lymphedema.

* Exercise is important in the treatment of lymphedema because the movements of the muscles stimulate the flow of the lymph into the capillaries. Wearing a compression garment during exercise also provides resistance to further stimulate this flow.

* Self-massage, as prescribed by your therapist, is another way in which lymph is encouraged to flow into the capillaries. Each self-massage session begins at the terminus with strokes to stimulate the flow of lymph that is already in the system. This is followed by specialized strokes that encourage the flow of lymph into the capillaries and then upward to the terminus.

The above information came from and belongs to www.Lymphnotes.com

Here is a picture of the lymphatic drainage system: http://www.gorhams.dk/assets/images/lymfesystemet.gif

The reason I assume that my acne is contributed to by possible lack of flow in my lymphatic system, is because the worst of my acne is directlyalong where the system lies under the facial skin: down the sides of my face and down each both corners of my lips in a line.

I share this because I doubt I'm the only one probably affected by these same problems.

As you have read (or skimmed ^_^) lymphatic blockage or stagnancy can be fixed through gentle massage. Exercise is also supposed to be good. Here are three massage related things that might be helpful.

-Facial Castor oil massage-Basically, when I apply my Castor oil at night, I apply it in a gentle, massage like way. This is done in gentle strokes along the lines of the LDS as can be seen in the above picture, in a downward motion. Do little strokes and work down, not one big swipe.

-Neck LDS massage-This is also done very gently, and I did not produce this process. this can be done with dry hands, but a little Castor is good if you have it handy. Take both hands and place them under your ears. Very gently stroke the skin so it pulls back toward the base of the back of your neck. Continue in small strokes down your neck. Where your shoulders begin, gently pull the skin toward the collarbone,and continue to the ends of your shoulders.

-Body Brush Massage-I also didn't create this. Basically, while naked, and with a natural bristle brush, gently stroke up your legs in short strokes. Once you get past your hips, brush in a circular motion over the rest of your body. This is very good for the LDS/circulation, and is very relaxing.

Hopefully this information has been helpful to some. Please ask questions and discuss this theory!

:)

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Awesome thread! I really think this may be a huge part of my acne because I also only have acne on the sides of my face.

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↑ Cool! Glad this could help.

I think that a lot of discoveries of things that are helpful for acne really come down to the LDS. Exercise, healthy eating, even the "dip" method, which would stimulate blood flow to the face, as well as the lymph system.

I hope more people have some input on this.

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Exercise/ The lymph system has no pump like the circulatory system (the heart) so you need to move it.

Supposedly, the best exercise for the lymph system is rebounding (jumping up and down on a trampoline). The gentle g forces force the lymph fluid throughout the body. But any exercise would work, I think.

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Exercise/ The lymph system has no pump like the circulatory system (the heart) so you need to move it.

Supposedly, the best exercise for the lymph system is rebounding (jumping up and down on a trampoline). The gentle g forces force the lymph fluid throughout the body. But any exercise would work, I think.

Yeah, I've read that recommendation tons of times. Also, some people lightly slap all over their bodies to stimulate lymph. I think starting at the extremities and working inward. There was a lesson on some workout DVD I rented.

I've been thinking of looking into lymph because my brother has an obese cat that gets sick a lot. Although she got sick first, then obese. Anyway, she recently had swelling in the lymph nodes in her back legs from some infection.

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I just wanted to give this a bump, as I think this is very important to a lot of people with acne. I have been massaging along the vessels on the sides of my face with Jojoba Oil for a few days now, and it feels and looks a lot better so far. Maybe I will get some Castor oil if it really is better for this too. I encourage everyone to give this a try..

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Great thread! I definitely think it's a good idea to look after your lymph system, and I've always heard great things about castor oil - I mix it with other oils/lotions. It's a little sticky on its own. It's also great for your hair!

Wanted to comment too that light bouncing up and down on a trampoline is all that's needed to stimulate your lymph system - you don't even have to "jump," just bounce. If you're just going to bounce, a cheap mini-tramp for Walmart would suffice, but if you're going to jump, stick with the more expensive rebounders, as these will be easier on your knees and joints. I'd avoid jumping on the cheaper ones.

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Great thread! I definitely think it's a good idea to look after your lymph system, and I've always heard great things about castor oil - I mix it with other oils/lotions. It's a little sticky on its own. It's also great for your hair!

Wanted to comment too that light bouncing up and down on a trampoline is all that's needed to stimulate your lymph system - you don't even have to "jump," just bounce. If you're just going to bounce, a cheap mini-tramp for Walmart would suffice, but if you're going to jump, stick with the more expensive rebounders, as these will be easier on your knees and joints. I'd avoid jumping on the cheaper ones.

Ah really? Does headbanging qualify?? :razz:

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Thank you for sharing! I just found out about this and am glad to know more. I definitely notice the pattern. It's interesting because I have been thinking that my acne is not food or hormone related.

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I'm been doing facial massage for about a year now. It's really made a positive impact (especially when I feel a breakout coming, sometimes it goes away before breaking the surface) I'm not sure if a clogged lymphatic system has anything to do with this, but a basic chemistry principle is greater agitation = greater reaction speed. (The reaction being the immune response of your body to "clean up" the acne)

Edited by tritonxiv

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