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Which oil is the healthiest?

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Pretty much what the title says? Which is the healthiest for frying things, and which for salads and such? Why and what's the difference?

I ask because I saw some people here say they only eat palm oil and EVOO and not any other oils and was wondering why.

Thanks for the help!

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Fried foods are bad for acne and its terrible for your heart. I wouldnt eat them.

My cardiovascular system is in ace condition, and I rarely eat fried food. I'm not planning to eat deep fried mars bars, just for a stir fry once in a while, or when I saute some onion for soups, or tofu. I also mentioned I'm interested in oil for salads as well.

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I love olive oil myself; it's a lovely oil with a delicious aroma for onion frying, fish frying, etc. Add garlic and pepper (and even lemon!) and one approaches heaven. But the nutrition gurus will no doubt have magnificent and even tasty suggestions for you. :)

I can't say which is healthiest.

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There's not really a "healthiest" oil per se. If someone was dying of an essential fatty acid defiency, I would certainly give them soybean oil instead of coconut oil; if someone was about to do a saute, I'd recommend coconut oil instead of soybean oil.

You have a certain requirement for different fatty acids, and those requirements need to be met. You have a relatively small requirement for the polyunsaturated fatty acids, but most people eat unnecessarily large amounts of those, and in poor ratios.

If you're cooking, I suggest an oil with a high smoke point (Google it if you're not sure). Coconut oil and butter are good for this purpose; their high saturated fatty acid content protects them from oxidation when cooking.

I would not cook with olive oil at anything above low temperatures, as it has a fairly low smoke point, and you partially ruin some of its great flavor by cooking with it. Olive oil is great to use with salad, breads, or foods that have already been cooked.

Polyunsaturated oils easily go rancid; the canola/soybean oil you pick up on the shelf is very likely already rancid, before you even open the bottle. If you can find a cold-pressed polyunsaturated oil that hasn't been deodorized and all that stuff, you can use it in the same situations as you would olive oil, or you could simply opt to get your polyunsaturated fats from whole food sources, which is easy to do. I do suggest fish oil (a polyunsaturated fatty acid supplement) if you don't eat fatty fish a couple times a week.

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As a graduate of a northern Italian culinary academy id have to say in my professional opinnion that only a good quality Spanish or Italian olive oil would do your taste buds justice :nod:

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As a graduate of a northern Italian culinary academy id have to say in my professional opinnion that only a good quality Spanish or Italian olive oil would do your taste buds justice :nod:

Taste buds aren't the primary concern. And the smoking point of olive oil, especially EVOO, is too low for frying.

And frying is not an ideal cooking method.

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Coconut oil is healthiest and great for baking.

Olive oil is most likely the healthiest oil to use when cooking.

It is best to cut back on your oils and eat more foods that are either steamed with just water such as veggies and eat a lot of greens and antioxidants which help prevent free radicals - good for skin and body! : ]

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Olive oil is most likely the healthiest oil to use when cooking.

As has now been pointed out numerous times...no, it's not.

It is best to cut back on your oils and eat more foods that are either steamed with just water

Why is that?

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saturated fats like virgin coconut oil are best for frying- i think the best in general...

it has antiviral, antibiotic, and anti fungal properties which are great for many things. It keeps your heart healthy since saturated fats are the hearts preferred fuel. As for frying...it does not oxidize (becoming harmful from frying) under high heat levels like most vegetable oils do. And the big winner for me was that a no fat diet or a diet of vegetable oils can prematurely age your skin leading to wrinkles and liver spots....EWWWW! Saturated fats from virgin coconut oil protect your skin leading to less wrinkles,age spots, and sun damage... which is why the philipinnes has some of the lowest rates of skin cancer even though they are on the equator... this oil protects their skin. and no it wont make you fat...it often causes people to lose body fat and for those that dont they come to their ideal wieght.

Taking two tbls. daily i noticed the following from coconut oil that made a big impact on me:

*dry skn appeared more moist and dewy without feeling oily

*(though i normally sleep from 2am-2pm) i woke up and practically jumped out of bed at 9 am (!)

*it is helping to balance my thyroid condition (this feels like side effects such as a slight flush of skin/a faster heart pace for a few hours after- then it goes away- this is a good sign

*unusual energy & no tirdness (I am chronically tired otherwise)

for more information see www.tropicaltraditions.com -buy here if you can, as it supports the islanders who have lost their profits from the claims made against saturated fats

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I'll add my voice in support of those of the others who are saying that you do NOT do your cooking (especially frying) in oils that are rich in unsaturated fatty acids (like olive oil). Something like coconut oil would be far preferable, to reduce the risk of oxidation. Even then I'd add some BHT to it, to further decrease the amount of oxidation from both cooking and storage. BHT is a powerful, synthetic fat-soluble antioxidant approved by the FDA for use in foods, drugs, and cosmetics. It's inexpensive, and easily available through various sources like beyond-a-century.com.

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