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megaman125

Oily Hair

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Hello, I've noticed recently that my hair is becomming fairly oily by midafternoon, and I'm not really sure why. I'm considering switching shampoos, but I'm not really sure if that's the problem. Here are the products I'm currently using.

Head and Shoulders shampoo - been using it for... well, a really, really long time, like since I was in middle school.

Oxy Cleansing pads - use morning and night, been using for 1-2 years now.

Tea Tree Oil - Just started using this about a month ago, and I love it. It does dry out my skin, which isn't really a bad thing, especially considering how oily my forehead would usually get. I've been using TTO morning and night as well, just after using the oxy pads.

I'm not really sure if I should change my shampoo or try some other product. What are your suggestions?

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My hair gets super greasy about 1 hours after washing it. If I skip a day. it is really gross. For me, I don't think it has anything to do with shampoos. My husband says I have a shampoo obsession because I always have at least 6 different kinds.

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Hello, I've noticed recently that my hair is becomming fairly oily by midafternoon, and I'm not really sure why.

Probably because you're messing with it too much physically: touching or scratching your head during the day, brushing or combing your hair too much, fiddling with a cap or hat, etc. That's apparently the only way that sebum gets onto hair in the first place.

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Well, Head and Shoulders will remove dirt and oil, and do a good job of keeping your scalp healthy. However, adding Tea Tree Oil, too, is probably what is causing the excessive production of oil.

Also, sometimes dietary changes can affect it. If you are stressed, physically, and emotionally, that can tax your bodily hormones. I recommend using a Tea Tree shampoo. That will cleanse your hair, and keep it healthy, while keeping your scalp healthy, as well.

But, just so you know, your scalp needs some of those natural oils that your body produces. So, don't cleanse to the point that your hair is excessively dry. That could also cause excessive production of oil, which Head and Shoulders can cause because it strips your hair and scalp of those essential oils.

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The whole lather, rinse, repeat routine helps me. Washing just once just doesn't remove enough oil. My hair is still oily once I leave the shower and gets gross rather quickly. I only use conditioner on the tips to help with frizzies. I also switched to a non-fragranced shampoo, because shampoos with fragrance were making my scalp itchy. Scratching at my scalp was spreading the oil and making it look worse.

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I guess it'd be a good idea to try it out and see how it effects your hair, try a shampoo for greasy hair or i'd reccomend getting a dry shampoo bottle (i'm not sure if you know of any) and carry it round with you for when your hair starts to feel oily, it's just a spray, so you pop that on your roots and rub it in and you're good to go.

Also, when you shower, don't wet your hair before you apply shampoo. leave the hair dry and rub shampoo over it, then rinse that out and shampoo as normal. Water and grease don't mix, so none of the oils in your hair will be rinsed out properly.

If you use conditioner of any sort, only apply it to the ends rather than the roots :)

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Probably because you're messing with it too much physically: touching or scratching your head during the day, brushing or combing your hair too much, fiddling with a cap or hat, etc. That's apparently the only way that sebum gets onto hair in the first place.

I don't think I'm touching it that much. I only comb it in the morning, and I can't stand wearing hats.

The whole lather, rinse, repeat routine helps me. Washing just once just doesn't remove enough oil. My hair is still oily once I leave the shower and gets gross rather quickly. I only use conditioner on the tips to help with frizzies. I also switched to a non-fragranced shampoo, because shampoos with fragrance were making my scalp itchy. Scratching at my scalp was spreading the oil and making it look worse.

Well, it's not that my hair is still oily just after my shower. It doesn't get oily until midafternoon (I shower in the morning).

I guess it'd be a good idea to try it out and see how it effects your hair, try a shampoo for greasy hair or i'd reccomend getting a dry shampoo bottle (i'm not sure if you know of any) and carry it round with you for when your hair starts to feel oily, it's just a spray, so you pop that on your roots and rub it in and you're good to go.

Also, when you shower, don't wet your hair before you apply shampoo. leave the hair dry and rub shampoo over it, then rinse that out and shampoo as normal. Water and grease don't mix, so none of the oils in your hair will be rinsed out properly.

If you use conditioner of any sort, only apply it to the ends rather than the roots :)

Really, I've always gotten my hair wet before shampooing just because it's easier to use the shampoo on wet hair as oppossed to dry hair. And no, I'm not using any conditioner.

I think I will try a different shampoo, just to see if there's a difference.

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I get the same problem sometimes and my hair builds up oils, so i find dry shampooing it really helps :) good luck!

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My hair is naturally oily. For example, let's say I wash my hair Monday night, by 2nd period on Tuesday morning it's practically an oil slick at the roots/bangs. My hair is thick, so the actually body of it is pretty well off for a day or two, but not any longer.

I don't think it has anything to do with shampoo, either, because I'm constantly rotating daily to keep from buildup and don't put any products near my roots. It's just the way my hair is and the climate that I live in (humid/hot most of the time). :doubt:

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But, just so you know, your scalp needs some of those natural oils that your body produces. So, don't cleanse to the point that your hair is excessively dry. That could also cause excessive production of oil, which Head and Shoulders can cause because it strips your hair and scalp of those essential oils.

Your scalp and skin probably need those "natural oils" of purely epidermal origin, but what they DON'T need is sebum, and the great majority of lipids on the skin is indeed from sebum. I wouldn't worry about over-washing, either, unless you do it really excessively. It's not going to cause excessive production of oil.

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Scratching at my scalp was spreading the oil and making it look worse.

EXACTLY! :) Kligman and his colleagues did a very thorough investigation of oils in the scalp and how well commercial shampoos work to eliminate them, and found (among many other things) that sebum simply doesn't naturally flow along hairs in the scalp, and isn't "wicked-up" by them (like wicks in a lamp or a candle). Sebum gets onto hair apparently only by physical contact, like when you scratch your head, sleep on a pillow, etc.

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I guess it'd be a good idea to try it out and see how it effects your hair, try a shampoo for greasy hair...

One of Kligman's main findings was that ALL SHAMPOOS REMOVE THE SAME AMOUNT OF LIPID. It doesn't make any difference how they are marketed, like "For Oily Hair" or "For Dry Hair" or "For Normal Hair". That's just marketing bullshit! They ALL remove the same amount of oil.

Also, when you shower, don't wet your hair before you apply shampoo. leave the hair dry and rub shampoo over it, then rinse that out and shampoo as normal. Water and grease don't mix, so none of the oils in your hair will be rinsed out properly.

Sorry, I don't buy that theory! :)

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Here's some more information about that testing that Kligman and his colleagues did on commercial shampoos (I'm copy/pasting this from an old post of mine on another site):

They specifically excluded "medicated" shampoos, because they wanted to understand the mechanics of just simple, plain washing with ordinary, garden-variety shampoos!

One of the many tests they did was to let their subjects go four days without shampooing, then measure the "efficiency" of the shampoos after a wash at the end of that period; efficiency was expressed as the measured percentage of total fats and lipids that the shampoos were able to remove. Here's a list of all the shampoos they used in that particular test, and the measured efficiency:

Johnson & Johnson Baby Shampoo: 88.8%

Herbal Essence: ................................... 88.5%

Breck (for oily hair): ............................... 86.1%

Breck (for normal hair): ........................ 88.1%

Earthborn: ............................................... 85.7%

Prel: .......................................................... 86%

One very interesting finding here is that shampoos that were supposedly designed for "oily" hair were no more effective at removing oil and sebum than shampoos designed for "normal" hair. Levels of detergents in these products are really of no particular significance. They are about all equally effective.

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Hello, I've noticed recently that my hair is becomming fairly oily by midafternoon, and I'm not really sure why. I'm considering switching shampoos, but I'm not really sure if that's the problem. Here are the products I'm currently using.

Head and Shoulders shampoo - been using it for... well, a really, really long time, like since I was in middle school.

Oxy Cleansing pads - use morning and night, been using for 1-2 years now.

Tea Tree Oil - Just started using this about a month ago, and I love it. It does dry out my skin, which isn't really a bad thing, especially considering how oily my forehead would usually get. I've been using TTO morning and night as well, just after using the oxy pads.

I'm not really sure if I should change my shampoo or try some other product. What are your suggestions?

Ive had that problem too! Try Paul Mitchell Step One Shampoo and Conditioner. Both are expensive but it will be worth it because you wont have to use a bunch of other hair products on your hair and it lasts six months if you buy a L. Only use the conditioner on the ends of your hair only

The whole lather, rinse, repeat routine helps me. Washing just once just doesn't remove enough oil. My hair is still oily once I leave the shower and gets gross rather quickly. I only use conditioner on the tips to help with frizzies. I also switched to a non-fragranced shampoo, because shampoos with fragrance were making my scalp itchy. Scratching at my scalp was spreading the oil and making it look worse.

I second that. I shampoo my hair twice, sometimes even three times

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And here's an actual excerpt from that study by Kligman et al about how sebum gets onto hair in the first place:

Refatting of Hair

Apart from the amount of sebum on the hair is the fascinating question of how it gets there. Hardly anyone has thought to look into the matter for the answer seems too obvious from the anatomy of the pilosebaceous unit. What could be more natural than to suppose that the sebum, excreted into the follicular canal, simply spreads up the hair shaft and uniformly coats it. Credit to Eberhardt for the imagination to question the obvious and for the elegantly simple methods employed in its refutation (Eberhardt 1976). When a droplet of sebum is placed on hair none of the lipid moves away; further, sebum will not creep along the surface when a terminal hair is placed in a capillary filled with sebum. We were incredulous and thought that the hair might first have to be moistened. However, we too found that sebum would not spontaneously spread out when droplets were placed on previously immersed hairs held in an atmosphere saturated with water. Further, we strung hairs in close parallel array on a wire frame, thinking that sebum placed at one end would migrate between the hairs by capillarity. Wetted or dry, the sebum showed not the slightest inclination to spread over the hairs as visualized by exposure to osmium tetroxide vapors. It seems an inescapable conclusion that the hairs become greased by mechanical transfer, from the scalp surface to the hairs, and from hair to hair. The hair acquires sebum by direct contact. The dispersal of sebum from the surface would be facilitated by combing and brushing, by wearing a hat, by rubbing the fingers through the hair, etc. Resilient, easily bendable thin hair would have a greater chance of contacting sebum than straight, stiff, widely-spaced hairs. Refatting of the hair is thus complex and will vary greatly from individual to individual.

It is logical to expect that that the segment closest to the scalp would have a greater chance of mechanical pick-up of sebum oozing out of the follicles. We did, in fact, find that in a 9-cm fiber, divided into thirds, the greatest amount of lipid was on the proximal third and the least on the distal. We considered the possibility that there might be a preferential separation of sebum components as the hair became refatted. However, it was found that the composition of lipid on the hairs was exactly the same as on the surface and was the same at various distances from the surface.

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You're allowed your own opinion Bryan but it's always worked for me. When you put water straight onto greasy hair it creates a barrier to shampoo, so rather than the shampoo removing the oils, the shampoo and water create a foam ontop of the grease instead of all 3 mixing together, whereas grease and shampoo do. It's always worked for me and i was just reccomending it.

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But, just so you know, your scalp needs some of those natural oils that your body produces. So, don't cleanse to the point that your hair is excessively dry. That could also cause excessive production of oil, which Head and Shoulders can cause because it strips your hair and scalp of those essential oils.

Your scalp and skin probably need those "natural oils" of purely epidermal origin, but what they DON'T need is sebum, and the great majority of lipids on the skin is indeed from sebum. I wouldn't worry about over-washing, either, unless you do it really excessively. It's not going to cause excessive production of oil.

Oh yes it will. Over-washing will also cause irreparable damage to the follicle and hair shaft.

I recommend starting from the nape of your neck to lather, then increase upward to the crown, then meet at the base of your hairline near the front of your forehead.

If you shampoo without water, you will cause more build up; thus, you will have an increase of oil production mixed with the build-up on your scalp. Sometimes, repeating a second time is necessary to remove build-up of oil. I have to do so for the back of my hair because it gets really oily back there.

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I wouldn't worry about over-washing, either, unless you do it really excessively. It's not going to cause excessive production of oil.

Oh yes it will.

So you're still a believer in the much-discredited "feedback theory", are you? :naughty:

Over-washing will also cause irreparable damage to the follicle and hair shaft.

Wow. IRREPARABLE damage, huh?? Could that be used as a depilatory? :)

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I wouldn't worry about over-washing, either, unless you do it really excessively. It's not going to cause excessive production of oil.

Oh yes it will.

So you're still a believer in the much-discredited "feedback theory", are you? :naughty:

Over-washing will also cause irreparable damage to the follicle and hair shaft.

Wow. IRREPARABLE damage, huh?? Could that be used as a depilatory? :)

If you want hair that looks like shit, then scrub till your heart's content.

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Ok, so I am trying a new shampoo. I thought I'd try the Axe shampoo, and I have noticed a decrease in the oilyness of my hair. It's still a little oily, and so is my forehead, but not nearly as bad as it was. I'll keep trying it for now.

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Biolage NORMALIZING shampoo is terrific for very oily hair. It's the only product that cleans my hair adequately, doesn't make me break out and isn't to harsh. JMHO.

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