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mhodgman50

Taken off Accutane for blood tests being to high?

Hey guys,

I'm only 7 weeks into my accutane treatment and I just got taken off it because my livers enzymes were too high. I've accomplished so much with my lifting/cardio but I really think it's the cause of the high levels. I have decided to give it up if I have to to be hopefully be able to use accutane. Anyone had the same experience? Did stopping lifting help? Should I keep running or stop the cardio too? I just neeeed to get back on this drug I can't stand my awful skin.

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noooooo man its definately not the lifting or the exercise. Im a mixed martial artist and lift,condition, or train everyday of the week. My liver enzymes were elevated also before i even started accutane... i was sposed to start two weeks before i actually did but due to the test i was told to hold off... i found that it was the supplement i was using. Supplements and maybe tylenol or alcohol or things like that will raise ur liver enzymes. I dont know how exercise could possibly do that. hope this helped.

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Hey, I've had erratic live enzymes for years. I've lifted weights for 15 years so have always had a high protein intake at the same time that my enzymes were high...I don't think that's just a coincidence. About 2 years ago I wanted to go on Accutane but my derm wouldn't let me because were enzymes seemed high. I decided to find if there was anything I could take to improve my levels and liver function. I found out milk thistle is supposed to be great for your liver. I took it for a few months then had blood work redone...levels were fine and have been fine ever since.

Give it a shot....it's fairly cheap and worth it if it works for you. Good luck.

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Strenuous exercise does indeed raise liver enzymes. Any activity that causes muscle tearing/damage releases certain catabolites into the bloodstream that the liver has to metabolize and get rid of, thus raising liver enzymes. Avoid strenuous exercise at least 24 hours before each blood test.

The following website has excellent tips on caring for your liver.

http://www.hepfi.org/living/liv_caring.html

Basic Liver Care

Your liver depends on you to take care of it . . . so it can take care of you. It serves as your body's engine, pantry, refinery, food processor, garbage disposal, and "guardian angel." The trouble is, your liver is a silent partner; when something's wrong it does not complain until the damage is far advanced. So it needs your help every day to keep it healthy and hepatitis-free. To do that, you need to eat a healthy diet, exercise, get lots of fresh air, and avoid things that can cause liver damage.

What does my liver do?

Sadly, people generally have little knowledge of the complexities and importance of the thousands of vital functions their livers perform nonstop.

The liver is about the size of a football – the largest organ in your body. It plays a vital role in regulating life processes. Before you were born, it served as the main organ of blood formation. Now, its primary functions are to refine and detoxify everything you eat, breathe, and absorb through your skin. It is your body's internal chemical power plant, converting nutrients in the food you eat into muscles, energy, hormones, clotting factors and immune factors.

It stores certain vitamins, minerals (including iron) and sugars, regulates fat stores, and controls the production and excretion of cholesterol. The bile, produced by liver cells, helps you to digest your food and absorb important nutrients. It neutralizes and destroys poisonous substances and metabolizes alcohol. It helps you resist infection and removes bacteria from the blood stream, helping you to stay healthy. Arguably, your liver isn't just your silent partner – it's your best friend.

Three things to avoid for liver health:

1 Avoid excessive alcohol.

Most people know that the liver acts as a filter and can be badly damaged by drinking too much alcohol. Liver specialists suggest that more than two drinks a day for men – and more than one drink a day for women – may even be too much for some people.

One of the most remarkable accomplishments of this miraculous organ is its ability to regenerate. (Three quarters of the liver can be removed and it will grow back in the same shape and form within a few weeks!) However, overworking your liver by heavy alcohol consumption can cause liver cells (the "employees" in the power plant) to become permanently damaged or scarred. This is called cirrhosis.

2 Avoid drugs and medicines taken with alcohol.

Medicines – especially the seemingly harmless acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol and other over-the-counter medications) – should never be taken with alcoholic beverages. Many prescribed and over-the-counter drugs and medicines (including herbal medications) are made up of chemicals that could be potentially hazardous to your precious liver cells, especially taken with alcohol.

If you are ill with a virus or metabolic disorder, liver damage may result from the medications you take. In such cases, you should ask your physician about possible liver cell damage.

3 Avoid environmental pollutants.

Fumes from paint thinners bug sprays, and other aerosol sprays are picked up by the tiny blood vessels in your lungs and carried to your liver where they are detoxified and discharged in your bile. The amount and concentration of those chemicals should be controlled to prevent liver damage. Make certain you have good ventilation, use a mask, cover your skin, and wash off any chemicals you get on your skin with soap and water as soon as possible.

Diet and Your Liver

Overview

Poor nutrition is rarely a cause of liver disease, but good nutrition in the form of a balanced diet, may help liver cells damaged by hepatitis viruses to regenerate, forming new liver cells. Nutrition can be an essential part of treatment. Many chronic liver diseases are associated with malnutrition.

Watch the Protein

To quickly determine your daily protein in grams, divide your weight in pounds by 2. Too much daily protein may cause hepatic encephalopathy (mental confusion). This occurs when the amount of dietary protein is greater than the liver's ability to use the protein. This causes a build up of toxins that can interfere with brain function. Protein is restricted in patients with clinical evidence of encephalopathy. However, controversy exists regarding the type of protein a diet should contain. Vegetable and dairy protein may be tolerated better than meat protein. Medications, such as lactulose and neomycin, may be used to help control hepatitis-related encephalopathy. Due to the body's need for proteins, protein restriction should only be undertaken with a doctor's advice.

Watch the Calories.

Excess calories in the form of carbohydrates can add to liver dysfunction and can cause fat deposits in the liver. No more than 30% of a person's total calories should come from fat because of the danger to the cardiovascular system. To figure out your daily calorie needs, you'll need a minimum of 15 calories a day for each pound you weight. Watch the Salt Good nutrition also helps to maintain the normal fluid and electrolyte balances in the body. Patients with fluid retention and swelling of the abdomen (ascites), or the legs (peripheral edema), may need diets low in salt to avoid sodium retention that contributes to fluid retention. Avoiding foods such as canned soups and vegetables, cold cuts, dairy products, and condiments such as mayonnaise and ketchup can reduce sodium intake. Read food labels carefully as many prepared foods contain large amounts of salt. The best-tasting salt substitute is lemon juice.

Watch Vitamins A and D

Excessive amounts of some vitamins may be an additional source of stress to the liver that must act as a filter for the body. Mega-vitamin supplements, particularly if they contain vitamins A and D, may be harmful. Excess vitamin A is very toxic to the liver.

Beware of Alcohol

You'll need to stop drinking completely to give your liver a break - a chance to heal, a chance to rebuild, a chance for new liver cells to grow. This means avoiding beer, wine, cocktails, champagne, and liquor in any other form. If you continue to drink, your liver will pay the price, and if your doctor is checking your liver function tests, it may be hard to determine if a change in a test means there has been damage to your liver due to the disease itself or because of the alcohol.

Beware of Alcohol and Acetaminophen

Acetominophen is an ingredient in some over-the-counter pain relievers, and is contained in many over-the-counter drugs used for colds or coughs. Taken with alcohol, these products can cause a condition called sudden and severe hepatitis which could cause fatal liver failure. Clearly, you should never combine these two substances. If you have any doubt about what medicines to take simultaneously, ask your doctor.

Beware of "Nutritional Therapies"

Herbal treatments and alternative liver medicines need to undergo rigorous scientific study before they can be recommended. "Natural" or diet treatments and herbal remedies can be quite dangerous. Plants of the Senecio, Crotalaria and Heliotopium families, plus chaparral, germander, comfrey, mistletoe, skullcap, margosa oil, mate tea, Gordolobo yerba tea, pennyroyal, and Jin Blu Huan are all toxic to the liver.

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Reference to working out...It isn't the lifting that is causing the raise in liver enzymes but possibly the supplements u are taking. Stay away from preworkout drinks that include no2 and high caffiene along with other ingredients. Products like pumped, amped etc should be avoided at least a week before blood tests as they make your liver enzymes go crazy on tests. Other bodybuilding supps like muscle milk and loads of others contain lots of vitamin A, some up to 35 percent daily recommendation which is a big no on accutane. Stay with fish oil and keep protein to normal amounts not mega amounts as we sometimes do when trying to maintain or gain muscle

dont stop working out good luck

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Strenuous exercise does indeed raise liver enzymes. Any activity that causes muscle tearing/damage releases certain catabolites into the bloodstream that the liver has to metabolize and get rid of, thus raising liver enzymes. Avoid strenuous exercise at least 24 hours before each blood test.

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Hey, I've had erratic live enzymes for years. I've lifted weights for 15 years so have always had a high protein intake at the same time that my enzymes were high...I don't think that's just a coincidence. About 2 years ago I wanted to go on Accutane but my derm wouldn't let me because were enzymes seemed high. I decided to find if there was anything I could take to improve my levels and liver function. I found out milk thistle is supposed to be great for your liver. I took it for a few months then had blood work redone...levels were fine and have been fine ever since.

Give it a shot....it's fairly cheap and worth it if it works for you. Good luck.

Thanks a lot dude. I'll ask my derm on next tuesday about that. Hopefully I'll be able to go back on it. For this week iv backed off on all excercise and eaten extremely healthy so hopefully the levels can go down.

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noooooo man its definately not the lifting or the exercise. Im a mixed martial artist and lift,condition, or train everyday of the week. My liver enzymes were elevated also before i even started accutane... i was sposed to start two weeks before i actually did but due to the test i was told to hold off... i found that it was the supplement i was using. Supplements and maybe tylenol or alcohol or things like that will raise ur liver enzymes. I dont know how exercise could possibly do that. hope this helped.

Thanks a lot man

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