Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
rakbs

Interesting graph/article about the changing American diet.

http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/08/...phix.ready.html

Some notes:

-Overall, dairy consumption is down 20%. Whole milk consumption plummeted, reduced fat milk consumption has partially replaced whole milk, and cheese consumption is up.

-We're eating 15% more vegetables per week. Notably, we're now eating 6x as much spinach.

-We're eating 25% more fruit per week, but half our fruit intake is in the form fruit juice.

-We're consuming 42% more grains, and 90% of that comes from refined grains. Oat and barley consumption is down, wheat and rice consumption are up.

-We're eating 17% more sweeteners.

-We're eating 59% more oils. Given that most restaurants have switched from traditional fats like butter and beef tallow to vegetable oil, I would assume that most of that 59% increase comes from polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and trans fatty acids.

-Beef, lamb, and veal consumption is down. Seafood and poultry consumption is up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If we are on the right path, then why are we still seeing high levels of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and other Western diseases? If we are supposedly "improving" our diet by cutting out whole milk, red or fatty meat, and saturated fats like butter, coconut oil, etc. then we should be getting healthier, according to current thinking, not worse? But that is not the case.

The changing diet is replacing these healthy forms of fat and protein with carbohydrates lacking in essential nutrients. The fats we are replacing are either trans fats or mono or poly unsaturated fats. This can lead to a poor omega 6 to 3 ratio, as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure we're just eating more food, more often because we're obsessing over what is healthy and what isn't. Most successful diets in terms of weight loss monitor caloric intake, not just carb/fat/protein ratios.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I'm surprised there's been improvements in any areas, but I think some things are distorted because we didn't eat those food items at all back then and don't really mean people are eating better.

The increase in the spinach is of course the introduction of the bagged baby spinach which didn't exist in yesteryear along with Italian restaurants introducing us to sauteed spinach. Before that, I think most Americans associated spinach with the nasty canned stuff, as many probably still do. The increase in veggies probably has a lot to do with the bagged salads, too.

And garlic wasn't so much a part of our boring cooking in yesteryear either. And shellfish wasn't so widely available. I live on the gulf coast on the outskirts of Houston and we drove down to the port areas to get shrimp. And I don't think I ever had it until I was ten or so and the cousin's neighbors went shrimping. After that it was kind of a Christmas Eve day tradition. But it wasn't in the supermarkets here much less throughout the country. I don't think that started until they got the ability to flash freeze on the boats.

Anyway, the improvements are all undone by the increase in sweeteners and juices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If we are on the right path, then why are we still seeing high levels of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and other Western diseases? If we are supposedly "improving" our diet by cutting out whole milk, red or fatty meat, and saturated fats like butter, coconut oil, etc. then we should be getting healthier, according to current thinking, not worse? But that is not the case.

The changing diet is replacing these healthy forms of fat and protein with carbohydrates lacking in essential nutrients. The fats we are replacing are either trans fats or mono or poly unsaturated fats. This can lead to a poor omega 6 to 3 ratio, as well.

Exactly. Americans have taken so much of the advice of nutrition leaders from the last 50 years: we're consuming less fat from dairy and red meat, we're eating more poultry and fish (which is generally leaner and less saturated), less butter, more fruits and vegetables, less eggs, more grains, more polyunsaturated/monounsaturated vegetable oils. Our consumption of sugar hasn't even increased by all that much. Granted, we're still eating too many refined grains as opposed to whole grains, and we're eating too many hydrogenated oils, but you would think that at least some measure of health would improve in America given the changes in our diet.

Good; we're on the right path. Sort of.

If we're on the right path, then why aren't we getting the slightest bit healthier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good; we're on the right path. Sort of.

If we're on the right path, then why aren't we getting the slightest bit healthier?

Because bagged spinach and salads are distorting the results. And any improvements in any area are undone by the increase in sugars. People also eat out a lot more than we did back in the 70s. And all the fried honey crispy chicken strip salads loaded with high fat dressing probably have a lot to do with the increase in chicken and vegetables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×