Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Klein

How do you afford eating healthy?

Recommended Posts

As the tittle says how do you afford it? I'm just starting a new diet of meats, lots of veggies, and some oils. Do you guys buy all organic meat? I know buying normal meat is bad due to all the hormones and additives but do any of you guys still buy it? Should I get wild salmon from an organic food store or can I get wild salmon from Costco and still be ok?

Also does anyone have any recommendations for getting rid of white heads around the t-zone especially the nose. My nose is the worst area for me. Also I use jojoba oil for a moisturizer is it safe to put it on my nose? Thanks for the input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As the tittle says how do you afford it? I'm just starting a new diet of meats, lots of veggies, and some oils. Do you guys buy all organic meat?

Not at all. I tried eating all-organic meat for a couple weeks, and then I realized that, wow, my quality of life was not increasing by spending three times as much on meat that didn't taste any better than normal.

I find Costco meat to be generally high quality. Whole Foods also has high standards for their meat, and they don't sell meat that was raised using antibiotics or hormones.

Should I get wild salmon from an organic food store or can I get wild salmon from Costco and still be ok?

Wild salmon is wild salmon. Get whatever you think the freshest source is, which may as well be Costco as any other store.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As the tittle says how do you afford it? I'm just starting a new diet of meats, lots of veggies, and some oils. Do you guys buy all organic meat? I know buying normal meat is bad due to all the hormones and additives but do any of you guys still buy it? Should I get wild salmon from an organic food store or can I get wild salmon from Costco and still be ok?

Also does anyone have any recommendations for getting rid of white heads around the t-zone especially the nose. My nose is the worst area for me. Also I use jojoba oil for a moisturizer is it safe to put it on my nose? Thanks for the input.

It's all about doing the best you can; can't afford to buy organic meat all the time? no problem, go with the next best thing you can afford (whether it be free range, not fed animal by-products, etc.). It's far more important to NOT eat all that processed garbage, by doing this you've already taken a huge step in improving your health and it won't hinder your progress if you're buying conventionally raised meat and conventionally grown fruits and vegetables.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been trying to buy healthier foods the past few weeks & I've noticed I've spent like three times as much as I usually do. :(

Sucks.

I'm on a really tight budget, so I'm not sure what I should do either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the others. I only buy organic when I can, and for certain things. I buy the natural (no antibiotics or hormones-free range) eggs and chicken since I eat those a lot and I buy organic carrots and apples because I juice those daily. Some other fruits I buy frozen because they are cheaper and the other veggies I buy regular and bought that wash to make sure they are clean. If they have organic on sale- I'll buy it...like I bought bananas the other day becaue they were only like 15 cents more than the regular ones.

As far as oils go- some are pricey yes. Like I just bough Sesame Oil and it was like $8.00 but it's a pretty large bottle so it should last me a while.

Point is, yeah some things are pricey but junk food can be pricey too and it's worth spending a little more for better food anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wait towards the end of the month and buy a lot of meat. I buy from companies that don't pump CO2 into their meat (it makes it look fresh when it's gone bad). I used grow my own veggies and go to the farmer's market. The food is a lot cheaper, better for you and you can get a good workout growing your own stuff.

If you can talk to the people who grow what you eat then you're better off. I refuse to buy junk from Chile, Mexico, South America, etc. They pick it unripe, bruise the crap out of it then expect you to buy bruised, flavorless fruit at a high price. I keep to certain fruits and just deal with some being out of season. When it's in season and I can buy it cheaper I eat a lot more of it, especially if it's locally grown.

I LOVE home grown stuff!! :wub::D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get my meat as USwellnessmeats.com. It is way cheaper than some, bc they have a 25% off coupon. Try buying good quality ground meats instead of steaks or certain cuts. Also, don't be afraid of good quality meats with a higher fat content, these are usually cheaper.

For vegetables, right now is not the best time, but when you can shop at farmers markets or sign up for a CSA. I am working for a CSA this summer so I am all set as far as that goes! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You just have to start making healthy habits, and recognizing what deals you can get on healthy stuff. It's just as easy to blow a bunch of money eating crappy foods. Start with the cheaper healthy foods and experiment with more expensive foods when you can afford to do so. Pay attention to how the foods affect your body and your skin. Eventually, you will find a balance of what you need and what you can afford.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If possible, choose organic produce for those fruits/veggies that are particularly high in pesticides, like peaches, apples, strawberries, etc. For a list of pesticide rankings, go here: www.foodnews.org/walletguide.php. However, keep in mind that whether eating organic produce or not, many people have rid themselves of disease simply be eating a plant-based diet with conventionally grown produce. If you choose organic and would like locally grown produce (your healthiest bet), visit the following link to find local farms, farmer’s markets, etc: www.localharvest.org. For a list of organic stores in your area, go here: www.eatwellguide.org.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I buy farmed meat, I only buy organic and free range. I honestly would be torn apart by the guilt otherwise. This means I only have meat maybe twice a week. The rest of the time I get protein from other sources and eat a lot of organic, fresh, seasonal produce. Essentially, this is how our ancestors ate. Meat was not a daily thing, it was the celebration of a successful hunt.

I believe it makes a huge difference, one your body will thank you for. The omega 3 & 6 fatty acids are so out whack in 'conventional' farmed meat, you might as well not eat it at all. Yes I thought about that statement, yes I mean it. I would rather eat a live snake than venture into the meat locker of costco.

Wild fish is wild fish. Buy it where it's cheapest. Farm raised fish has the same omega 3:6 problems as any other farmed, grain fed animal.

Clip coupons, buy in season, shop the perimeter of the store.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mr. Scrooge would've wanted to be my best friend before the pesky ghost of Christmas past found him.

Normally I'll sit down with the weekly bag of flyers on Friday after work. I'll check out all the prices at the stores in my hometown. Whatever meat is on sale, that is what I would purchase that week. I'll think up a recipe. I make enough so that I can put leftovers in the fridge and eat that a few nights during the week. It's cool because it limits trips to the grocery store to not-too-often and not-too-hermity.

I keep an eye out for certain products that are 'treats' for me. When then go on sale, I get a treat that week. Treats for me are dark Lindt chocolate, Kraft smooth peanut butter, a container of heavy whipping cream, etc.

I'll stock up on everyday staples like butter and eggs when there is a sale (eggs don't degrade when refridgerated). Eggs are cheap anyways and one of my meals is usually eggs once a day.

You can make your meat stretch buy cooking it up and using it in an omellet too.

I stock up on bacon or cubed steak when there is a sale. Freeze in individual portions and make a recipe when you feel like it.

Buy a whole chicken and cook it, it's a great way to have a bit of meat most weekdays.

Use cubes steak and veggies to make shishkabs in the summer. Stews in winter.

I don't eat a lot of vegetables, I'm on a high-fat diet, so I might buy zucchini on the cheap, a bag of carrots (which last forever, use one at a time in a stew recipe), maybe a bell pepper occasionally or a can of tomato paste. Fruits can be expensive, I wait for a sale on strawberries. I'll buy two packs, they will last a long time if you don't cut them up. I cut up one pack and have a couple with breakfast everyday or when I'm feeling peckish, and then I cut up the second pack in a week or two. Buy frozen blueberries on sale. Boil them down and add a touch of stevia and vanilla for desert.

I invest in having garlic, hot sauce, balsamic vinegar, vanilla, sea salt and stevia for when I need some seasoning. Dried herbs too. Try and find potted plants of herbs in the summer, leave them outside, the take them in and take care of them for year-round use.

The best money-saving tip I can offer is to plan most of your week meals with the sales of the week, and stick to three good-sized meals per day and try hard not to snack. Meat is really satisfying, and a little bit on most nights can really save you money if the meat is on sale too.

Try and make a stew a few times every month, freeze some of the leftovers and keep a few containers of it in the fridge to eat that week, it really helps, plus it saves on daily cooking, and its great if you don't have a lot of time to eat every night. Then in a month you can still enjoy the stew you made before. The flavours have a chance to mingle too and it always tastes better the day after you make it. =)

Try and grow your own zucchini, pumkins, cucumbers, tomatoes and carrots in the summer. The tomatoes and cucumbers will be delicious as is, and you can pickle the carrots and have a treat all year. Zuccini for the kebabs, and you can freeze the pumpkins for pudding in the colder months (which tastes better after a frost).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't care for meat and never buy and cook it at home, so that's not an issue. I mostly buy fish and watch for sales. And occasionally buy chicken. Buy skin on bone in thighs or leg quarters. They are the cheapest. And boil or poach so you have the broth for soup.

And just buy organic in the cases where pesticides are the worst/most difficult to remove and where it's inexpensive. See the link to the list you've already gotten. But I want to suggest to everyone that they also buy organic bananas, even though there isn't as much of an issue with pesticides getting into the fruit. Bananas are dirt cheap, even organic bananas. They are grown in environmentally fragile third world countries and tended by some of the poorest laborers. It hardly costs you a thing to do them and the planet a favor by encouraging organic bananas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of buying the organic, you could try the natural meats, as they're significantly cheaper. If you do buy natural, make sure they're labeled hormone and antibiotic free. "Natural" isn't really a regulated term and can mean a lot of different things.

Whole foods is really pricey (although sometimes you can catch a sale). Your area might have one of the cheaper health food supermarkets like Trader Joes--I think they're a bit more reasonable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of buying the organic, you could try the natural meats, as they're significantly cheaper. If you do buy natural, make sure they're labeled hormone and antibiotic free. "Natural" isn't really a regulated term and can mean a lot of different things.

Whole foods is really pricey (although sometimes you can catch a sale). Your area might have one of the cheaper health food supermarkets like Trader Joes--I think they're a bit more reasonable.

I always buy fresh chicken breast.

It's hormone and antibiotic free.

But expensive. I eat around 2.3lbs+ of chicken breast a day.

They cost $5.25 per lbs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Instead of buying the organic, you could try the natural meats, as they're significantly cheaper. If you do buy natural, make sure they're labeled hormone and antibiotic free. "Natural" isn't really a regulated term and can mean a lot of different things.

With the exception of eggs, which can also have misleading labels, I don't see these things in any of our stores. Personally, I would be much more interested in animals that are pastured and treated right, than organic.

BTW, it's my understanding that they usually don't give chickens hormones. Chickens grow fast enough and aren't kept around long enough that there's little benefit to giving them hormones.

If you have access to buffalo, that's a good option. You really can't mistreat buffalo. They can't even be herded except by moving their water source so they follow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally, I would be much more interested in animals that are pastured and treated right, than organic.

Absolutely - So long as people buy animal products from companies that mistreat animals, it will continue - as long as the govt. allows it to anyway - there are new guidelines going into CA about the treatment of animals, but it will take "years" to go into effect.

If you are unaware of how animals are mistreated, please go here: http://www.goveg.com/factoryFarming.asp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's unfortunate that food in general is currently quite expensive. I'm a big advocate of organic foods but when it comes to produce, some of the prices can be truly outrageous. I buy conventional produce that has a thick skin (avocados, etc) And usually conventional broccoli/asparagus. When it comes to fruit I think your best bet is to buy organic. I have this amazing produce market near where I live selling local, cheap produce in bulk, but most is not organic....I still wonder whether it's worth it to buy organic, because I could be buying a lot more/eating a lot more vegetables and fruits otherwise... I know at Costco and other bulk suppliers you can buy salad mix (which I'm interested in purchasing for the purpose of green smoothies) in bulk...would that be ok?

Also, is freezing your meat going to greatly compromise it's nutritional value? It's so much easier to buy a lot when I have the money and store it. Can anyone comment on the meat at Trader Joe's? I usually buy my chicken at Whole Foods (or as I like to call it "Whole Wallet") but as someone mentioned Trader Joe's is cheaper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^ "Whole Wallet," - that's great!! :lol:

My Costco carries those big tubs of organic greens, and I think those are great. Spinach is highly sprayed with pesticides though, so I never buy it conventional. It all depends on what it is I'm buying.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ayla:

Essentially, this is how our ancestors ate. Meat was not a daily thing, it was the celebration of a successful hunt.

Hmm? By some accounts, meat and game was very plentiful around our ancestor's time. History tells us that humans would follow animals wherever they went to ensure themselves a good food supply. On the contrary I haven't seen any evidence that groups of humans would have been able to get enough energy from scavenging produce, particularly in the winter. It seems to me that meat would have certainly been a daily thing for any successful group of hunter-and-gatherers, whether from wild animals freshly killed, or from the carcasses of already-hunted animals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@ayla:

Essentially, this is how our ancestors ate. Meat was not a daily thing, it was the celebration of a successful hunt.

Hmm? By some accounts, meat and game was very plentiful around our ancestor's time. History tells us that humans would follow animals wherever they went to ensure themselves a good food supply. On the contrary I haven't seen any evidence that groups of humans would have been able to get enough energy from scavenging produce, particularly in the winter. It seems to me that meat would have certainly been a daily thing for any successful group of hunter-and-gatherers, whether from wild animals freshly killed, or from the carcasses of already-hunted animals.

Hmm, I could have been more clear. Meat, in the quantities typically consumed now, was not an everyday occurrence - meat in those quantities was the result of a successful hunt. The remaining meat was dried/smoked/cured with salt, etc., and rationed carefully through dry spells. Root vegetables were stored in in dry, dark spaces to last through winter. Fruits and herbs were dried in the sun while plentiful to be consumed at a later date.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×