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Gaining weight without getting acne?

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Hey,

I have a problem with my weight: I am way underweight.

I would really like to gain some pounds, but I'm afraid it will make me get acne again.

An easy way to gain weight,I guess, is to eat a whole lot of candy and drink soda. However, it has so many bad side-effects and all that sugar can be good for nice skin.

How should I handle this? I have absoluteley no fat on my body. I do workout, and I thought about using protetin supplements in shape of whey protein, but whey isn't great for acne either.

I am lost. Please help me so that I can get to look normal.

Thank you

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I had the same problem. No, you don't need to even change your diet. I just ate more calories during the day. I sometimes added a meal after dinner. It's about getting your calorie intake up.

I gained 10 pounds back just by adding more meals. And I didn't break out.

Oh and you should probably make sure you're eating more of a Low GI food. I increase my brown rice the most. It's like 300 calories for each bag.

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Loading up on more high caloric, and starchy nutrient-rich foods will do it for you. Lots of beans, lentils, nuts/seeds, avocado, starchy veggies like potatoes, squash, cooked carrots, etc, and starchy whole grains like brown rice. You definitely don't need junk to gain weight. :)

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Do you know which foods do affect your acne, and which ones don't? That would be helpful information for us to know. Like ABG fairy said, it's easy enough to gain weight if you eat plenty of starchy foods--but doing so might affect your skin (it would definitely affect mine), which is obviously not what you want. Alternatively, some people can tolerate 8-16 cups of milk a day without affecting their skin, and this is another way to put on weight--but again, it might not be for you.

An offhand piece of advice would be to take foods that you know don't break you out, and eat enough of them to hit at least 3,500 calories a day.

Edit: I forgot to add--don't buy whey protein powder. It's of little help to someone trying to put on bodyweight; it's only really appropriate for weightlifters who use it for post workout protein synthesis.

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^ Good point Rakbs about the starchy foods. I kinda forget about that since I can pretty much eat whatever I want as long as I do my green smoothies. There are plenty of low-glycemic foods though like beans, nuts/seeds, and avocado that would allow you to put on weight. You don't want to overdo it with nuts/seeds though - maybe just a couple ounces a day. Too many nuts/seeds could make you break out as well. Including lots of blended greens into your diet should help control your acne.

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It'd probably be easier to eat more healthy fats like virgin coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil and raw butter. You need fats to help regulate your hormones; and this way you don't have to eat as much to up your calorie intake. Stomach stretching is not fun!

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^ One should still use oils sparingly though, as they are a processed food with little, if any at all, nutrition. You can quickly eat lots of calories with the intake of nuts/seeds, while maintaining nutrition. I actually make sauces and dressings by blending up nuts and seeds. This way, I can avoid processed oils and maintain nutrients.

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yes. dont eat bad foods. just eat more good foods. like everyone said brown rice is some good stuff. brown rice and beans. yum. ive been making some curried brown rice with almonds and golden raisins. its sooo delicious. and beautifully orange. whenever i go backpacking my main food is lentils and brown rice. add some dehydrated veggies and you have a full protein, calorie packed heavy meal

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^ One should still use oils sparingly though, as they are a processed food with little, if any at all, nutrition. You can quickly eat lots of calories with the intake of nuts/seeds, while maintaining nutrition. I actually make sauces and dressings by blending up nuts and seeds. This way, I can avoid processed oils and maintain nutrients.

Oils have little nutrition? lolwut... Are you claiming this is the case for olive and coconut oils??

To the OP: try eating more meat. Great lifting good.

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^ One should still use oils sparingly though, as they are a processed food with little, if any at all, nutrition. You can quickly eat lots of calories with the intake of nuts/seeds, while maintaining nutrition. I actually make sauces and dressings by blending up nuts and seeds. This way, I can avoid processed oils and maintain nutrients.

Oils have little nutrition? lolwut... Are you claiming this is the case for olive and coconut oils??

To the OP: try eating more meat. Great lifting good.

Yes.... sorry to disappoint you Glass Dance. It's surprising information for most people - it certainly was for me!! Dr. Joel Fuhrman M.D. basis his information on credible, peer-reviewed studies, and below are his words about processed oils:

I know you were told that olive oil is health food. It is not. Keep in mind, oil is processed food, it is not a natural whole food. Oils, even if they are monounsaturated, should not be health food because they are low in nutrients and contain 120 calories per tablespoon, promoting weight gain.

Sure, olive oil and almond oil are improvements over animal fats and margarine, but they still are a contributor to our overweight modern world. Overweight Americans consume and average of three tablespoons of oil in their daily diet, adding and extra 360 calories to their food each day. You need to reach a thinner, ideal weight to achieve maximum protection against heart disease and to reverse heart disease. Use oil, even olive oil sparingly or not at all; certainly, do not have more than one teaspoon per day.

As an alternative to oil, you can make great tasting salad dressings from raw nuts and seeds, such as walnuts, pecans, cashews, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, pistachios and avocados.

Source:

He said, "Oils, even if they are monounsaturated, should not be health food because they are low in nutrients..." I'm not sure if coconut oil is specifically included in this, but it's an oil, so I would assume so. Again, his articles are based upon credible studies by credible sources, such as The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, so you might want to read his take on coconut oil... but you may not like what he has to say: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls...amp;btnG=Search

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Hey,

I have a problem with my weight: I am way underweight.

I would really like to gain some pounds, but I'm afraid it will make me get acne again.

An easy way to gain weight,I guess, is to eat a whole lot of candy and drink soda. However, it has so many bad side-effects and all that sugar can be good for nice skin.

How should I handle this? I have absoluteley no fat on my body. I do workout, and I thought about using protetin supplements in shape of whey protein, but whey isn't great for acne either.

I am lost. Please help me so that I can get to look normal.

Thank you

Hey.. Well if you want to gain weight the best way is to lift (the right way) and have a high caloric intake. I am not sure what is and what isn't good for acne, and i've heard that it's as simple as trial and error for different people. Different foods trigger acne in different people. However, as for lifting, if you lift with no knowledge you will go nowhere. The best exercises are the compound exercises because they stimulate the most muscle groups in your body. These include Benching, Squatting, Deadlifting, Overhead Press, Power Cleans, Pullups, and Chinups. There's also some more, and i am not sure what routine you use to workout, but if i were you i would definitely look into Ripptoes Starting Strength. As for the acne part, just shower as soon as possible after your workout.

Do you know which foods do affect your acne, and which ones don't? That would be helpful information for us to know. Like ABG fairy said, it's easy enough to gain weight if you eat plenty of starchy foods--but doing so might affect your skin (it would definitely affect mine), which is obviously not what you want. Alternatively, some people can tolerate 8-16 cups of milk a day without affecting their skin, and this is another way to put on weight--but again, it might not be for you.

An offhand piece of advice would be to take foods that you know don't break you out, and eat enough of them to hit at least 3,500 calories a day.

Edit: I forgot to add--don't buy whey protein powder. It's of little help to someone trying to put on bodyweight; it's only really appropriate for weightlifters who use it for post workout protein synthesis.

Is whey really bad for you? I am 16, 17 on Thursday but i have to wait a while to get my liscense cuz of my parents. I want to workout, and have some whey protein powder in my closet which i was planning on using to make my protein shakes. I found that when i stopped drinking milk (or having it in cereal) my acne looked better in the mornings. I still avoid milk when possible, but sometimes i will drink it. Also, fruits/vegetables have been known to help as has a lot of water. Best of luck to you man, really hope you succeed. I'll be in a similar situation as you soon, so it'd be cool to know what happens with you.

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I would recommend getting a second opinion, so to speak. Clearly, it is convenient for you, because he is a vegetarian doctor who demonizes animal products and fats. I could cite Dr. Mercola as "evidence" that both these oils are exceptionally healthy, but that wouldn't really prove anything.

He lost a lot credibility to me when he said they should be avoided due to their 120 calories/tablespoon amount, vastly oversimplifying the issue of weight gain. Fats are simply not the reason for "our overweight world." If it were, we would have gotten thinner with our recent decreased dietary fat consumption. We have only gotten fatter.

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Glass Dance,

Dr. Fuhrman's ultimate point is that we should consume as much nutrition per calorie as we can, and because oils have barely any nutrients, they are very low on the nutrient per calorie totem pole. Also, I really love a lot about Dr. Mercola, but unlike Dr. Fuhrman, he doesn't always site credible and peer-reviewed studies, so not all the information he gives is accurate. It's a fallacy that coconut oil is made up of the "good" saturated fats that is so often claimed by those who glorify coconut oil. Scroll down to Dr. Mercola's response on March 9, 2006: http://74.125.95.132/search?q=cache:SgBJAm...;cd=2&gl=us

You're right, fats are not the only reason for weight gain... weight gain is caused by eating too many calories in general. With fat, however, those calories quickly add up.

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