Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
balthasar

milk and acen

Recommended Posts

Hey,

I’ll just start with this while I still have your attention: Milk and Cheese can aggravate acne severely. I’m not a dermatologist and there seems to be a lot of rubbish on the internet about what does and doesn’t affect acne so I’ll leave it at this: It’s often said that diet doesn’t affect acne and yet cultures which don’t subsist on western diets have very low acne rates. Everyone’s skin is different and I don’t want to get anyone’s hopes up with a miracle cure as acne is a complex disease with multiple causes but I will say that cutting out dairy did a lot in improving my skin.

On a more personal note and at risk of sounding self indulgent, I thought my acne was a lot worse than it actually was, I knew people with worse acne than me but I really let it get to me and stop me doing things. I think it’s really important and can make you into a better person if you can rise above it. People probably care too much about their appearances especially at the age most people get acne. Trying to see acne as an opportunity to better myself by forgetting what I looked like to people really helped me to develop a positive outlook on the whole thing (although the process was slow and hard, don’t get disheartened); it probably also helped improve things directly as I stopped picking and squeezing, I think meditating and yoga also helped.

Good luck!

Sorry, there seems to be something wrong with links appearing. There were links to two major newspaper articles originally but they didn't come through. Just google milk and acne and there will be reputable information!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*throws out all the dairy products*

what about nuts (peanut butter) and chocolate? ham, rice, chicken? these are what I eat most of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree dairy does cause acne with alot of people. i had really bad acne and stoped drinking milk and eating anthing with cheese and my acne got better.i still get some zits but not like before.it was hard at first cause everything seems to ahve cheese in it.give it a try you got nothing to lose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is some research supporting the link between dairy intake and acne flare-ups. It is thought to be due to the hormones in the dairy and/or the high levels of iodine in dairy products. High iodine foods or medications are also thought to be a trigger for acne flares.

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is some research supporting the link between dairy intake and acne flare-ups. It is thought to be due to the hormones in the dairy and/or the high levels of iodine in dairy products. High iodine foods or medications are also thought to be a trigger for acne flares.

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

And wheat/gluten, soy, tree nuts, eggs, citrus, or whatever you personally might be allergic too. Your clinic is useless for singling out just a couple of things.

For me it's citrus. I have not issues with dairy, peanuts, and high iodine foods. At least, not regarding acne. Citrus, except lemons, causes horrific cystic breakouts.

And there's a lot of research supporting many links between food and acne.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one theory that i had heard, atleast regarding milk, was that it was the hormones contained that that effected the sebaceous glands, and in turn caused acne.

Peronally, i cut out milk, cheese, and butter. I still eat peanut butter (natural), and yogurt though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is some research supporting the link between dairy intake and acne flare-ups. It is thought to be due to the hormones in the dairy and/or the high levels of iodine in dairy products. High iodine foods or medications are also thought to be a trigger for acne flares.

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

And wheat/gluten, soy, tree nuts, eggs, citrus, or whatever you personally might be allergic too. Your clinic is useless for singling out just a couple of things.

For me it's citrus. I have not issues with dairy, peanuts, and high iodine foods. At least, not regarding acne. Citrus, except lemons, causes horrific cystic breakouts.

And there's a lot of research supporting many links between food and acne.

Well, actually my "useless" acne clinic as you call it, clears more than 90% of their clients - even those who have failed multiple rounds of accutane. I'm pretty sure they know what they are doing. They realize that if you make the diet changes too complicated, people won't stick to them or their skin care regimen. The clinic warns people about the main culprits - the ones that have the most medical evidence behind them. There isn't much real research out there on any other diet-acne links, with the possible exception of a couple of studies on high glycemic diets (which are rather poorly designed and difficult to interpret). The dietary recs that my clinic makes are also those that are recommended by Dr. James Fulton - acne expert, chemist, and co-developer of Retin-A.

Allergic reactions are a very different type of breakout than are acne flare-ups. If it happens pretty much overnight, its probably an allergic reaction. The other dietary factors that increase acne flares that are not allergy related usually have cumulative effects (so it takes a period of time for the iodine or hormones to reach a level where they lead to acne flares). And of course, if you aren't already acne prone, none of these dietary factors are going to cause acne all on their own. Most of the time, diet is just an aggravating factor, not an original cause of the acne.

Witch foods are high in iodine? Is fish oil among them?

I don't think fish oil tablets are a problem. Some of the biggies are kelp (which has more PPMs of iodine than pretty much anything else), iodine in multivitamins, organ meats, shellfish, iodized salt, and dairy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whatever. Dairy or no dairy you will still have acne.

:rolleyes: Yes but dairy can make acne a lot worse especially when I cannot digest it without getting sick too. Ice cream never used to make me sick and now everytime I eat it, I get the whole bloated thing. I cannot even eat one bite of ice cream without breaking out! I find it bizzare too that I became allergic to it after a second try at minocycline which is an antibiotic where youre not supposed to have dairy two hours before taking it or two hours after.

Kim, when you say avoid dairy, does that also mean to avoid chocolate? I eat chocolate everyday because it makes me happy. Personally, I know my acne isnt related to just a milk allergy though. I break out nonstop in the winter, my hormones have definitely changed during a duration of the past three years, and acne runs on both sides of my family, two uncles had severe acne.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is some research supporting the link between dairy intake and acne flare-ups. It is thought to be due to the hormones in the dairy and/or the high levels of iodine in dairy products. High iodine foods or medications are also thought to be a trigger for acne flares.

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

And wheat/gluten, soy, tree nuts, eggs, citrus, or whatever you personally might be allergic too. Your clinic is useless for singling out just a couple of things.

For me it's citrus. I have not issues with dairy, peanuts, and high iodine foods. At least, not regarding acne. Citrus, except lemons, causes horrific cystic breakouts.

And there's a lot of research supporting many links between food and acne.

OMG, everyone has different skin. Some people dont even break out from foods but break out simply because of a hormonal imbalance or genetics. Thats not kind to tell Kim her clinic is useless. They have helped her a lot. This is why I barely ever post on this site anymore. I think this site does me more harm than good, people piss me off here too much. Life actually makes me upset in general but this site really lowers my self esteem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is some research supporting the link between dairy intake and acne flare-ups. It is thought to be due to the hormones in the dairy and/or the high levels of iodine in dairy products. High iodine foods or medications are also thought to be a trigger for acne flares.

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

With regard to iodine, you need to know that iodine can flare pre-existing acne but has never ever been described to actually cause the plugging of pores (microcomedo formation) that is the first step in making acne. As far as the milk in dairy is concerned, here is part of a letter published in the Archives of Dermatology:

"Whether iodine in any concentration causes true acne is debatable. Kelp is recognized as causing an acneform eruption where the iodide source is indeed high, and there is little doubt that a papular and papulopustular acneform eruption can be triggered by halides, but the hallmark of acne, the comedo, is not part of the initial lesion in this picture. Comedones may appear as secondary lesions. The development of an inflammatory lesion is fully consistent with iodide’s ability to enhance the inflammatory reaction.

While excess milk intake could lead to excess intake of iodide, if one wished to consume sufficient milk to approximate the 750mg daily therapeutic dose of potassium iodide provided as therapy to a patient with erythema nodosum, that would require daily ingestion of 1140L of milk containing 500 μg iodide per liter. An FDA study in 1990 concluded that some individuals can tolerate very high levels of iodine with no apparent side effects and that iodine intakes less than or equal to 1.0 mg / day are probably safe for the majority of the population, but may cause adverse effects in some individuals. The definitive work needed to answer the question would be a blinded trial of a very high iodide diet in a teenage or young twenties population. I suspect it would be a significant challenge to obtain ethics approval, let alone volunteers, for such a study."

So please don't worry about iodine as a cause of your acne. Dairy and high glycemic load foods are much more important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a vegan and I can say that I have never experienced acne until I started my birth control.

My brother and Mother have had mild acne. My best friend is also a vegan and she has no sign of acne.

Everyone has different skin- which has been said here before.

A lot of my vegan friends do not have a trace of acne though and have been vegan for longer than 7 years.

You can take supplements for almost everything. We are incredibly healthy people.

If you are interested in dropping dairy products, please research it first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

And wheat/gluten, soy, tree nuts, eggs, citrus, or whatever you personally might be allergic too. Your clinic is useless for singling out just a couple of things.

For me it's citrus. I have no issues with dairy, peanuts, and high iodine foods. At least, not regarding acne. Citrus, except lemons, causes horrific cystic breakouts.

And there's a lot of research supporting many links between food and acne.

OMG, everyone has different skin. Some people dont even break out from foods but break out simply because of a hormonal imbalance or genetics. Thats not kind to tell Kim her clinic is useless.

OMG, That clinic's advice would have been just as useless to me as all the dermatologists I ever went to were. Their list of foods do not cause acne for me. While other foods do. And I've encountered many, many other people who break out from those other foods, far more than iodine. To be effective, they should either test or advise following an elimination diet of various foods that people are commonly intolerant to. Almost none do though. My dermatologist just shrugged uninterestedly when I told him that my cysts cleared after I quit eating oranges.

I think it's ridiculous to take offense at my comment. I was merely pointing out that there are many, many more potential food issues and it's useless to pick just a few that may or may not apply. Because yes, everyone is different. Which is what I said in the first place.

And hormones are affected by diet. They are saying now that even genetics can be affected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There isn't much real research out there on any other diet-acne links, with the possible exception of a couple of studies on high glycemic diets (which are rather poorly designed and difficult to interpret). The dietary recs that my clinic makes are also those that are recommended by Dr. James Fulton - acne expert, chemist, and co-developer of Retin-A.

The only poorly designed studies I've seen are the ones that supposedly proved no connection, such as the goofy chocolate study from the 60s.

And in addition to the direct diet-acne studies, such as the RMIT study in which the diet they believed would improve acne, did improve the subjects' acne, there are many studies on acne and factors known to cause acne. And many studies on those factors and diet. Some are studying other hormonal issues like PCOS or prostrate cancer, and some are directly studying the factors such as as IGF-1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

And wheat/gluten, soy, tree nuts, eggs, citrus, or whatever you personally might be allergic too. Your clinic is useless for singling out just a couple of things.

For me it's citrus. I have no issues with dairy, peanuts, and high iodine foods. At least, not regarding acne. Citrus, except lemons, causes horrific cystic breakouts.

And there's a lot of research supporting many links between food and acne.

OMG, everyone has different skin. Some people dont even break out from foods but break out simply because of a hormonal imbalance or genetics. Thats not kind to tell Kim her clinic is useless.

OMG, That clinic's advice would have been just as useless to me as all the dermatologists I ever went to were. Their list of foods do not cause acne for me. While other foods do. And I've encountered many, many other people who break out from those other foods, far more than iodine. To be effective, they should either test or advise following an elimination diet of various foods that people are commonly intolerant to. Almost none do though. My dermatologist just shrugged uninterestedly when I told him that my cysts cleared after I quit eating oranges.

I think it's ridiculous to take offense at my comment. I was merely pointing out that there are many, many more potential food issues and it's useless to pick just a few that may or may not apply. Because yes, everyone is different. Which is what I said in the first place.

And hormones are affected by diet. They are saying now that even genetics can be affected.

Well, when you call the clinic "useless", not having any experience with them - then yes, I am going to take offense at the comment. Given the results they get with their clients, their advice is far from being useless. Dietary recs are only a small part of their comprehensive, individualized treatment plans for their clients. Looking at those before/after pics, I would say that the recommendations they make seem to be working quite well for their clients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There is some research supporting the link between dairy intake and acne flare-ups. It is thought to be due to the hormones in the dairy and/or the high levels of iodine in dairy products. High iodine foods or medications are also thought to be a trigger for acne flares.

According to the acne clinic I go to, peanuts can also cause problems. The main foods they tell us to stay away from are dairy, high-iodine foods, and peanuts.

With regard to iodine, you need to know that iodine can flare pre-existing acne but has never ever been described to actually cause the plugging of pores (microcomedo formation) that is the first step in making acne. As far as the milk in dairy is concerned, here is part of a letter published in the Archives of Dermatology:

"Whether iodine in any concentration causes true acne is debatable. Kelp is recognized as causing an acneform eruption where the iodide source is indeed high, and there is little doubt that a papular and papulopustular acneform eruption can be triggered by halides, but the hallmark of acne, the comedo, is not part of the initial lesion in this picture. Comedones may appear as secondary lesions. The development of an inflammatory lesion is fully consistent with iodide’s ability to enhance the inflammatory reaction.

While excess milk intake could lead to excess intake of iodide, if one wished to consume sufficient milk to approximate the 750mg daily therapeutic dose of potassium iodide provided as therapy to a patient with erythema nodosum, that would require daily ingestion of 1140L of milk containing 500 μg iodide per liter. An FDA study in 1990 concluded that some individuals can tolerate very high levels of iodine with no apparent side effects and that iodine intakes less than or equal to 1.0 mg / day are probably safe for the majority of the population, but may cause adverse effects in some individuals. The definitive work needed to answer the question would be a blinded trial of a very high iodide diet in a teenage or young twenties population. I suspect it would be a significant challenge to obtain ethics approval, let alone volunteers, for such a study."

So please don't worry about iodine as a cause of your acne. Dairy and high glycemic load foods are much more important.

Yes, with no comedones present, iodine is not as likely to be a problem. Although there is some medical research that shows that certain medications for thyroid patients that contain high levels of iodine can induce acne in people who are not normally acne-prone. High levels of dietary iodine may flare up existing comedones in the skin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There isn't much real research out there on any other diet-acne links, with the possible exception of a couple of studies on high glycemic diets (which are rather poorly designed and difficult to interpret). The dietary recs that my clinic makes are also those that are recommended by Dr. James Fulton - acne expert, chemist, and co-developer of Retin-A.

The only poorly designed studies I've seen are the ones that supposedly proved no connection, such as the goofy chocolate study from the 60s.

And in addition to the direct diet-acne studies, such as the RMIT study in which the diet they believed would improve acne, did improve the subjects' acne, there are many studies on acne and factors known to cause acne. And many studies on those factors and diet. Some are studying other hormonal issues like PCOS or prostrate cancer, and some are directly studying the factors such as as IGF-1.

There are also some poorly designed studies on high glycemic diets and acne. A couple of recent studies supposedly found that lower glycemic diets were associated with fewer acne breakouts. There were a number of limitations with these studies - there were so many dietary changes for the low glycemic group that its very difficult to pinpoint precisely which of those changes led to the lower levels of acne. Also, the study was funded by a meat processing association, which is not exactly an unbiased source when it comes to studies on diet. The dairy studies, while interesting, were retrospective study that only show a possible correlation between self-reported dietary intake and self-reported acne. There are many limitations to retrospective, self-report research designs. And because it is only a correlational study, not much can be said about the causative connection between dairy and acne. Not saying its not worth additional research, but these studies alone don't make any definitive findings between dairy intake and acne breakouts.

Most other dietary information comes from people's own personal experiences, rather than from scientific research studies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There isn't much real research out there on any other diet-acne links, with the possible exception of a couple of studies on high glycemic diets (which are rather poorly designed and difficult to interpret). The dietary recs that my clinic makes are also those that are recommended by Dr. James Fulton - acne expert, chemist, and co-developer of Retin-A.

The only poorly designed studies I've seen are the ones that supposedly proved no connection, such as the goofy chocolate study from the 60s.

And in addition to the direct diet-acne studies, such as the RMIT study in which the diet they believed would improve acne, did improve the subjects' acne, there are many studies on acne and factors known to cause acne. And many studies on those factors and diet. Some are studying other hormonal issues like PCOS or prostrate cancer, and some are directly studying the factors such as as IGF-1.

There are also some poorly designed studies on high glycemic diets and acne. A couple of recent studies supposedly found that lower glycemic diets were associated with fewer acne breakouts. There were a number of limitations with these studies - there were so many dietary changes for the low glycemic group that its very difficult to pinpoint precisely which of those changes led to the lower levels of acne.

Yes, we've had that discussion here before specifically about the RMIT study when it first started being published in so many periodicals, from medical journals to Redbook. But it doesn't matter that the RMIT researchers didn't determine exactly what about the GI improved the subjects' acne. What matters is that the diet they thought would help, did. That hardly makes it 'poorly designed' or difficult to interpret. It's perfectly simple.

In addition, it probably isn't exactly the same for everyone as a hormone balance can have many varying factors and degrees that make the subject more sensitive to high blood sugar and their effect on hormones and/or the hormone levels themselves. Such as liver function, as it's the liver's job to remove excess hormones from circulation, which it doesn't do well when it's busy removing other crap from a person's system. A nutrient dense, low-GI diet also tends to increase SHBG levels which would reduce free testosterone.

So there isn't necessarily one thing that can be 'pinpointed.' There are dozens of ways a low GI diet affects hormones. And other ways it can affect acne such as inflammation. The body is balancing a lot of functions. There's lots of give and take going on. What gives can vary from person to person.

And it's not necessarily entirely the low GI. When you cut back high GI foods, you tend to replace them with more nutrient dense foods as they did in the study. Nutrients are what your body uses to function. A few might also have lost weight, which can effect hormone levels.

And I don't get what you mean by 'there were so many dietary changes for the low glycemic group...' They followed a pretty common lower GI diet replacing sodas, potato chips and white bread with veggies, whole grains and legumes. This is cause for puzzlement?? We know how the GI works. It's been studied too.

Besides there are many other studies that do pinpoint specific effects of GI diets on hormone issues. Just google 'diet and hormones' and you'll find a million articles, books and studies. In fact, a low GI diet seems to be the number one thing to study in relation to hormone issues from PCOS to Prostrate cancer or anything to do with Androgens. Why would that be? Because there have already been tons of studies proving a relationship between diet and the factors involved in those conditions. And some of those studies involve a low fat and low GI diet, which has nothing to do with promoting the meat industry.

We know that androgens play a major role in oily skin and acne. That's been studied, proven and accepted. We know that things like SHBG levels affect hormone balance. We know that blood sugar affects androgen production. We know that SHBG levels tend to increase on a low GI diet. Studied, proven, yada yada. Etcetera.

And finally, all of these interconnected things can affect acne and be improved by diet, sleep and exercise:

Digestion, allergies and intolerances, liver function, adrenal function, hormone balance, SHBG levels, Insulin resistance, inflammation, cell function and turnover, sebum quality, nutrient deficiencies, body fat, stress etc, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone is thinking of removing dairy from their diet, try switching to unsweetened soya milk. I switched 3wks ago and it seems to be helping, and I personally really like the taste!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If anyone is thinking of removing dairy from their diet, try switching to unsweetened soya milk. I switched 3wks ago and it seems to be helping, and I personally really like the taste!

Yes, but be careful with that too. Many people break out from soy. You just have to try it. And if doesn't help, try rice or almond milk. Or nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now here's an example of a poorly designed study whose conclusions should never even been taken seriously. I mean, come on. It's just a questionnaire!! And the subjects didn't change their diets. They just compared people with acne to people without acne. Hello! Some people are predisposed to acne. Some aren't. Some people get IBS, allergies, diabetes, cancer and heart disease. Some don't. That doesn't mean their diet and lifestyle didn't have an effect. Some get other conditions.

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/Study-fin...html&hl=IGF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×