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AutonomousOne1980

Benzoyl peroxide is bad

Autonomous, you might think that BP doesn't work because of the people that are here. But go check the testimonials and you'll see that people here are definitely a minority compared to the BP, let alone all the others OTC.

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Autonomous, you might think that BP doesn't work because of the people that are here. But go check the testimonials and you'll see that people here are definitely a minority compared to the BP, let alone all the others OTC.

i never said it didnt work to any degree i said it has the potential to cause oxidative damage to skin and cause premature aging of the skin, thats it. thats all it might do aint gonna kill anybody, if fact go ahead and continue to use it.

then i pondered the possiblity that it may have made my acne worse because of its oxidative qualitys as one major theory for the prime cause of acne happens to be oxidative stress. so if oxidative stress it a potential cause then why would anyone want to put more on their skin?? this is merely a hypothesis and therefore may be false, its just something to consider, pure theory.

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My personal view is this:

Look at Dan's skin. It's awesome. No one will debate that. I know that he only uses it on part of his face, however. He's been using it for years.

It always causes fine lines to appear on my face. I'm only 21. It doesn't work for me either. It just blows up the comedones.

It obviously works for some people.

Bottomline: The dependence factor. I don't want to be 60 and slathering on acne cream. I'm sure Dan even agrees with this. I have not seen many people grow out of acne using this stuff. That's why i would never in a million years go down the topical path.

there's somethign weird to me about killing the natural bacteria on skin. P. acnes is on everyone's skin, so it can't be the problem.

As for oxidative stress....that's the exact mechanism for why it works on acne. : P The comedones are oxidized and "flushed."

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It always causes fine lines to appear on my face.

I'm 25 and have had acne for over 11 years.

I'v used BP in various regemens for over 8 years and it gives me fine lines too, it also makes my scars look deeper and more obvious which worries me because generally they never go away, I would happily accept a few fine lines and even a few full blown deep wrinkles in exchange for clear skin though, thats why I'm giving the DKR one more shot (I last tried it 4 years ago).

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My personal view is this:

Look at Dan's skin. It's awesome. No one will debate that. I know that he only uses it on part of his face, however. He's been using it for years.

It always causes fine lines to appear on my face. I'm only 21. It doesn't work for me either. It just blows up the comedones.

It obviously works for some people.

Bottomline: The dependence factor. I don't want to be 60 and slathering on acne cream. I'm sure Dan even agrees with this. I have not seen many people grow out of acne using this stuff. That's why i would never in a million years go down the topical path.

there's somethign weird to me about killing the natural bacteria on skin. P. acnes is on everyone's skin, so it can't be the problem.

As for oxidative stress....that's the exact mechanism for why it works on acne. : P The comedones are oxidized and "flushed."

i thought it was for its exfoliative and antibacterial properties??

not its potential deletion of dna instructions???

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Basically it's antibacterial effect comes from its oxidative properties. P. acnes live in the pore and feed on oil and are generally intolerant to oxygen. Benzoyl peroxide pulls oxygen in the pore and kills the P acnes. It also oxidizes the fatty acids on which the bacteria feed, thus reducing the comedone content. The problem with this is. P. acnes is necessary for the sloughing of the pore--they activate the enzyme that allows for the skin to shed. Thus maybe antibacterials is actually bad for comedones. Many people say that BP helps with inflammatory acne but makes mild acne (comedones and blackheads) even worse. The aforementioned is a possible explanation.

They have found that antibiotics work MAINLY not for their bacteriocide properties, but for their anti-inflammatory properties. For example, low dose doxycycline works. At such a low dose, it can't kill the bacterial but it can cool inflammation, helping the prognosis of acne.

My personal view is this:

Look at Dan's skin. It's awesome. No one will debate that. I know that he only uses it on part of his face, however. He's been using it for years.

It always causes fine lines to appear on my face. I'm only 21. It doesn't work for me either. It just blows up the comedones.

It obviously works for some people.

Bottomline: The dependence factor. I don't want to be 60 and slathering on acne cream. I'm sure Dan even agrees with this. I have not seen many people grow out of acne using this stuff. That's why i would never in a million years go down the topical path.

there's somethign weird to me about killing the natural bacteria on skin. P. acnes is on everyone's skin, so it can't be the problem.

As for oxidative stress....that's the exact mechanism for why it works on acne. : P The comedones are oxidized and "flushed."

i thought it was for its exfoliative and antibacterial properties??

not its potential deletion of dna instructions???

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I don't think BP is good either unless you only have a small number of zits (like 3 or less, I guess). Controlling sebum production would be favorable to killing bacteria that are on everyone's skin, but don't cause everyone zits.

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I'm definitely not a BP fan ... it visibly dehydrates, irritates and ages my skin. I might've been willing to put up with some of that when I was in my teens, but not now. AHAs and topical retinoids are terrific anti-acne AND anti-aging products, so I have no reason to mess around with BP.

That said, if BP is keeping people's acne in check, I'm not going to try to talk them out of using it.

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Oh my, looks like this discussion has turned around to bite me in the behind: The last couple days for some blemishes, I just started putting a prescription BP product twice a day. For whatever reason, the skin looks red, feels thick, rough, and makes my face look even worse! I guess my skin wasn't used to the abundance of BP so suddenly...what do I do? I got to go to work tomorrow and I need to get rid of this redness!!

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Basically it's antibacterial effect comes from its oxidative properties. P. acnes live in the pore and feed on oil and are generally intolerant to oxygen. Benzoyl peroxide pulls oxygen in the pore and kills the P acnes. It also oxidizes the fatty acids on which the bacteria feed, thus reducing the comedone content. The problem with this is. P. acnes is necessary for the sloughing of the pore--they activate the enzyme that allows for the skin to shed. Thus maybe antibacterials is actually bad for comedones. Many people say that BP helps with inflammatory acne but makes mild acne (comedones and blackheads) even worse. The aforementioned is a possible explanation.

They have found that antibiotics work MAINLY not for their bacteriocide properties, but for their anti-inflammatory properties. For example, low dose doxycycline works. At such a low dose, it can't kill the bacterial but it can cool inflammation, helping the prognosis of acne.

soooooo john, if not bp then what would be recommended for mild acne? wondering if that's why bp has stopped working for me...

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Basically it's antibacterial effect comes from its oxidative properties. P. acnes live in the pore and feed on oil and are generally intolerant to oxygen. Benzoyl peroxide pulls oxygen in the pore and kills the P acnes. It also oxidizes the fatty acids on which the bacteria feed, thus reducing the comedone content. The problem with this is. P. acnes is necessary for the sloughing of the pore--they activate the enzyme that allows for the skin to shed. Thus maybe antibacterials is actually bad for comedones. Many people say that BP helps with inflammatory acne but makes mild acne (comedones and blackheads) even worse. The aforementioned is a possible explanation.

They have found that antibiotics work MAINLY not for their bacteriocide properties, but for their anti-inflammatory properties. For example, low dose doxycycline works. At such a low dose, it can't kill the bacterial but it can cool inflammation, helping the prognosis of acne.

soooooo john, if not bp then what would be recommended for mild acne? wondering if that's why bp has stopped working for me...

even though i dont expect anyone to believe me, diacneal is very good for acne, you might be able to get it off of ebay, its retinaldehyde and glycolic acid. of course im assuming that these substances are safe as well and its very likely they are.

Retinaldehyde i think is a form of vitamin a, and glycolic acid is from fruit origin, i think. so vitamin and fruit??? you may want to double check all that to be sure this is all from the top of my head.

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Persistent Comedones (little white seeds, blackheads, whiteheads) are often termed "cosmetic acne." This type of acne is the result of irritation from products, leading to deep seated clogged pores that are resistant to treatment. If I were you, I would just wash daily with dove beauty bar for a few seconds with lukewarm water. And don't use topicals. Sorry, I can't recommend more than that, since I have a strong disdain for topicals of any sort. I've tried them all.

Basically it's antibacterial effect comes from its oxidative properties. P. acnes live in the pore and feed on oil and are generally intolerant to oxygen. Benzoyl peroxide pulls oxygen in the pore and kills the P acnes. It also oxidizes the fatty acids on which the bacteria feed, thus reducing the comedone content. The problem with this is. P. acnes is necessary for the sloughing of the pore--they activate the enzyme that allows for the skin to shed. Thus maybe antibacterials is actually bad for comedones. Many people say that BP helps with inflammatory acne but makes mild acne (comedones and blackheads) even worse. The aforementioned is a possible explanation.

They have found that antibiotics work MAINLY not for their bacteriocide properties, but for their anti-inflammatory properties. For example, low dose doxycycline works. At such a low dose, it can't kill the bacterial but it can cool inflammation, helping the prognosis of acne.

soooooo john, if not bp then what would be recommended for mild acne? wondering if that's why bp has stopped working for me...

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Basically it's antibacterial effect comes from its oxidative properties. P. acnes live in the pore and feed on oil and are generally intolerant to oxygen. Benzoyl peroxide pulls oxygen in the pore and kills the P acnes. It also oxidizes the fatty acids on which the bacteria feed, thus reducing the comedone content. The problem with this is. P. acnes is necessary for the sloughing of the pore--they activate the enzyme that allows for the skin to shed. Thus maybe antibacterials is actually bad for comedones. Many people say that BP helps with inflammatory acne but makes mild acne (comedones and blackheads) even worse. The aforementioned is a possible explanation.

They have found that antibiotics work MAINLY not for their bacteriocide properties, but for their anti-inflammatory properties. For example, low dose doxycycline works. At such a low dose, it can't kill the bacterial but it can cool inflammation, helping the prognosis of acne.

soooooo john, if not bp then what would be recommended for mild acne? wondering if that's why bp has stopped working for me...

Neutrogena oil-free acne wash (2% salicylic acid) and topical ACV mixed with tea tree oil in water have both worked well for me in the past. Dove beauty bars work well for getting dirt and residue off your face, as the person above said. Neutrogena is by far my favorite company for over the counter cleansers. Cetaphil is a good over the counter product as well, but I only have ever used their moisturizer.

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AHAs and topical retinoids are terrific anti-acne AND anti-aging products

Sounds great!

Care to specify which topical retinoids and AHAs you are refering to?

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AHAs and topical retinoids are terrific anti-acne AND anti-aging products

Sounds great!

Care to specify which topical retinoids and AHAs you are refering to?

Green Cream (retinoid), Mandelic acid (AHA)......................Hint: read her signature, thats where i got the info.

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Interesting...

I've recently given up using BP, which was quite a leap of faith as I had used it religiously for the last 6-7 years to varying degrees of effectivenes. (I always gave it credit when it worked and blamed other factors when it didnt! :lol:)

However I've been off it for a bit and can't say that my skin feels significantly different, I'll need to give it a bit more time to see what changes. I've not been breaking out so I suppose its nod really needed right now.

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Thanks for the tip...but for now it's what's keeping me atleast someone clear.

I am starting some Progesterone Cream soon and I am hoping that will help my hormonal acne and if it does, I will just use BP to sopt treat as needed.

Dude, Heather! I went on a progesterone cream a couple years ago cuz an herbalist was recommending it to me when i was trying to clear my acne. my doctor yelled at me and told me not to mess around with it. putting hormones like that (even just on ur skin) she said can be really dangerous.

just felt i should share...

gg

Thanks, but I have read in several places that it is perfectly safe to use, and even can be recommended for pregnant women...I mean to me, it seems safer than Accutane, or even Spiro...which I may still end up taking if the progesterone doesn't work.

http://www.johnleemd.com/store/faqs_progest_crm.html

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AHAs and topical retinoids are terrific anti-acne AND anti-aging products

Sounds great!

Care to specify which topical retinoids and AHAs you are refering to?

Green Cream (retinoid), Mandelic acid (AHA)......................Hint: read her signature, thats where i got the info.

:dry:

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AHAs and topical retinoids are terrific anti-acne AND anti-aging products

Sounds great!

Care to specify which topical retinoids and AHAs you are refering to?

as stated earlier, I use Green Cream (OTC high-retinol gel) and mandelic acid.

I can also vouch for Diacneal, which is an OTC retinoid/AHA combo (retinaldehyde and 6% glycolic acid) made by Avene. Excellent topical for mild/moderate acne.

Jan Marini also makes a combo product that I've heard good things about.

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Oh my, looks like this discussion has turned around to bite me in the behind: The last couple days for some blemishes, I just started putting a prescription BP product twice a day. For whatever reason, the skin looks red, feels thick, rough, and makes my face look even worse! I guess my skin wasn't used to the abundance of BP so suddenly...what do I do? I got to go to work tomorrow and I need to get rid of this redness!!

Stop using BP (and any other active products) until your skin goes back to normal.

Wash your face very gently, with lukewarm water and either no cleanser or a very mild one. Moisturize, if you have one that won't sting. Otherwise, leave your face alone until it recovers.

Once your skin is normal again, try using the product ONCE a day and see how that goes.

Persistent Comedones (little white seeds, blackheads, whiteheads) are often termed "cosmetic acne." This type of acne is the result of irritation from products, leading to deep seated clogged pores that are resistant to treatment.

Not to argue, particularly, but comedonal acne is not always the result of irritation from products. For some of us, that's just the kind of acne we get.

It is, as you say, extremely resistant to treatment. Mine has been with me for more than 30 years. :doubt:

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YEP!

I thought BP was the only thing that would semi-help my crappy skin. I used it for years...oh yes...years. Of the 10 years I've had acne, I used BP for maybe about 8?

Then...I hit my 20s and golly jeepers...still getting acne. The stuff seemed okay for teenage stuff, but I'm 21 now and using it seems to dry my skin and irritate it more than help it-even with globs of oil free moisturizer. Then I started reading the other ingredients in some of these BP products and thought to myself..."why on earth am I stripping my skin and slathering on all of these chemicals that I can't even pronounce on it?!"

I stopped using it and switched to natural stuff and no, my skin isn't 100% clear yet because I haven't stuck with a regimen for more than a few days (I'm starting a new one-I've been experimenting) and quite frankly, I'm still satisfied. My skin is more hydrated, soft and feels a lot more healthy. As for acne...using natural stuff has had a bit more of an effect on me than BP has and it's safer.

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Hi LionQueen (awesome name),

Kligman made an observation in the 70s or 80s, I think. He noticed that there was a particular kind of acne in women that hardly EVER appears in men. The comedones that arise are stubborn and almost impossible to get rid. He called it "cosmetic acne," really acne that results from comedogenic ingredients in products. But I don't doubt for a second that people possible get that type of acne simply because they do.

Oh my, looks like this discussion has turned around to bite me in the behind: The last couple days for some blemishes, I just started putting a prescription BP product twice a day. For whatever reason, the skin looks red, feels thick, rough, and makes my face look even worse! I guess my skin wasn't used to the abundance of BP so suddenly...what do I do? I got to go to work tomorrow and I need to get rid of this redness!!

Stop using BP (and any other active products) until your skin goes back to normal.

Wash your face very gently, with lukewarm water and either no cleanser or a very mild one. Moisturize, if you have one that won't sting. Otherwise, leave your face alone until it recovers.

Once your skin is normal again, try using the product ONCE a day and see how that goes.

Persistent Comedones (little white seeds, blackheads, whiteheads) are often termed "cosmetic acne." This type of acne is the result of irritation from products, leading to deep seated clogged pores that are resistant to treatment.

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