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tobias

Does fibre help insulin spikes?

More specifically, I recently found out I have access to raw milk and want to start drinking it becoz of it's great nutritional value. Fibre of course helps with foods of high GL, but as we know dairy products despite their low GI values cause massive insulin spikes. Can something like konjac gluccomannan help to kerb this?

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Lactose causes huge spikes in insulin compared to casein alone.

This is seen with milk with a lot of lactose compared to cheese with virtually no lactose. Both have casein. Yogurt in the next link is comparable to milk. Cheese is in the link's table.

http://www.mendosa.com/insulin_index.htm

Fibre such as glucomannan and psyllium have benefited diabetic patients and acne sufferers when taken with meals.

Fibre for hypreglycemia...

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12569112

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16154305

As for insulins reaction to these there is little information, however its effect on hyperglyc/lipidemia is a good indicator of benefit to insulin levels. Diabetics usually take insulin in response to blood glucose and they need less with fibre.

Scientists are not sure whether hyperinsulinemia is so bad.

Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia are.

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So it could work?

Another aspect I was thinking is probiotics are recommended to be taken with fibre. Milk is obviously very rich in probiotic-properties.

So perhaps 2 reasons which would suggest fibre with milk...

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So it could work?

Another aspect I was thinking is probiotics are recommended to be taken with fibre. Milk is obviously very rich in probiotic-properties.

So perhaps 2 reasons which would suggest fibre with milk...

if it's fermented that is... normal milk doesnt have any probiotic in it

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So it could work?

Another aspect I was thinking is probiotics are recommended to be taken with fibre. Milk is obviously very rich in probiotic-properties.

So perhaps 2 reasons which would suggest fibre with milk...

if it's fermented that is... normal milk doesnt have any probiotic in it

Tobias is talking about raw milk, which does have natural bacteria in it, since it wasn't pasteurized.

I personally wouldn't drink any kind of milk, even if it does have probiotics in it.

75% of dairy cows are infected with Bovine Leukemia Virus, which has been shown to cross species. Leukemia rates in people are higher in dairy farm states, and in pets who are given raw milk. Pasteurization ordinarily kills viruses as well as bacteria, so raw milk specifically puts you at a much much higher risk of exposure to this virus. I think there are safer ways of getting probiotics.

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So it could work?

Another aspect I was thinking is probiotics are recommended to be taken with fibre. Milk is obviously very rich in probiotic-properties.

So perhaps 2 reasons which would suggest fibre with milk...

if it's fermented that is... normal milk doesnt have any probiotic in it

Tobias is talking about raw milk, which does have natural bacteria in it, since it wasn't pasteurized.

I personally wouldn't drink any kind of milk, even if it does have probiotics in it.

75% of dairy cows are infected with Bovine Leukemia Virus, which has been shown to cross species. Leukemia rates in people are higher in dairy farm states, and in pets who are given raw milk. Pasteurization ordinarily kills viruses as well as bacteria, so raw milk specifically puts you at a much much higher risk of exposure to this virus. I think there are safer ways of getting probiotics.

oo living~

I got a bag of glucomanan and just tried it out

It didnt gel at all....I mixed 1/2 tsp with maybe too many water ( 1/2 tsp powder in 2 measuring cups) but it only took me like 3 secs to mix and drink it all down ( pour the powder in water...stir..drink)

any progress on ur glucomanan method?

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Lactose causes huge spikes not casein.

Where did you get THAT idea? Assuming that the original poster is referring to insulin spikes and not blood sugar spikes, I think that it probably _is_ the casein causing that, not the lactose. I could be wrong, but I don't think lactose has a particularly high glycemic index.

.

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Milk is obviously very rich in probiotic-properties.

if it's fermented that is... normal milk doesnt have any probiotic in it

Tobias is talking about raw milk, which does have natural bacteria in it, since it wasn't pasteurized.

Any milk is "probiotic" in one important sense: all milk contains lactose, which is a food for lactobacilli, and encourages their growth.

.

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Lactose causes huge spikes not casein.

Where did you get THAT idea? Assuming that the original poster is referring to insulin spikes and not blood sugar spikes, I think that it probably _is_ the casein causing that, not the lactose. I could be wrong, but I don't think lactose has a particularly high glycemic index.

.

In the insulin index link I gave you will notice that cheese with NO lactose does not spike insulin as high as milk ( milk like yogurt has both lactose and casein ).

Lactose and casein do not have a high glycemic index.

I was talking about their insulin index not their glycemic index however I will clarify it by editing it.

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In the insulin index link I gave you will notice that cheese with NO lactose does not spike insulin as high as milk ( milk like yogurt has both lactose and casein ).

Lactose and casein do not have a high glycemic index.

The problems I have with what you're saying is that cheese certainly isn't devoid of lactose, although cheese in general has less lactose than milk.

Furthermore, milk isn't even listed in that table that you linked with the insulin indexes; you're merely ASSUMING that milk is going to have the same insulin response as yogurt, so you use the same data for milk as what they provide for yogurt. But that's going too far out on a limb, in my opinion, because they don't say very much about the specific foods that were tested. For example, what KIND of cheese did they test? What KIND of yogurt did they test? Did the yogurt have fruits and sugar mixed in with it, like so many of the yogurt brands on the market? What kind of milk was the yogurt made from (skim, low-fat, or whole milk)? Without knowing more details of that testing, I really don't think it's wise to attempt to extrapolate values of specific foods that weren't even included in the testing! :)

I just find it difficult to believe your claim that lactose (a simple disaccharide which even YOU apparently admit doesn't even have a particularly high glycemic index) could somehow elicit a strong insulin response. If milk really does have a strong insulin response (I'm saying IF it has that), it must be due mainly to the protein content, not the lactose.

.

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In the insulin index link I gave you will notice that cheese with NO lactose does not spike insulin as high as milk ( milk like yogurt has both lactose and casein ).

Lactose and casein do not have a high glycemic index.

The problems I have with what you're saying is that cheese certainly isn't devoid of lactose, although cheese in general has less lactose than milk.

Furthermore, milk isn't even listed in that table that you linked with the insulin indexes; you're merely ASSUMING that milk is going to have the same insulin response as yogurt, so you use the same data for milk as what they provide for yogurt. But that's going too far out on a limb, in my opinion, because they don't say very much about the specific foods that were tested. For example, what KIND of cheese did they test? What KIND of yogurt did they test? Did the yogurt have fruits and sugar mixed in with it, like so many of the yogurt brands on the market? What kind of milk was the yogurt made from (skim, low-fat, or whole milk)? Without knowing more details of that testing, I really don't think it's wise to attempt to extrapolate values of specific foods that weren't even included in the testing! :)

I just find it difficult to believe your claim that lactose (a simple disaccharide which even YOU apparently admit doesn't even have a particularly high glycemic index) could somehow elicit a strong insulin response. If milk really does have a strong insulin response (I'm saying IF it has that), it must be due mainly to the protein content, not the lactose.

.

lactose turns into sugar when digested afterall

and sugar causes insulin spike :ninja:

since the bacteria feeds on lactose in yogurt and cheese...so they contain much less lactose than milk

maybe that's why they dont cause as much insulin spike..?

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In the insulin index link I gave you will notice that cheese with NO lactose does not spike insulin as high as milk ( milk like yogurt has both lactose and casein ).

Lactose and casein do not have a high glycemic index.

The problems I have with what you're saying is that cheese certainly isn't devoid of lactose, although cheese in general has less lactose than milk.

Furthermore, milk isn't even listed in that table that you linked with the insulin indexes; you're merely ASSUMING that milk is going to have the same insulin response as yogurt, so you use the same data for milk as what they provide for yogurt. But that's going too far out on a limb, in my opinion, because they don't say very much about the specific foods that were tested. For example, what KIND of cheese did they test? What KIND of yogurt did they test? Did the yogurt have fruits and sugar mixed in with it, like so many of the yogurt brands on the market? What kind of milk was the yogurt made from (skim, low-fat, or whole milk)? Without knowing more details of that testing, I really don't think it's wise to attempt to extrapolate values of specific foods that weren't even included in the testing! :)

I just find it difficult to believe your claim that lactose (a simple disaccharide which even YOU apparently admit doesn't even have a particularly high glycemic index) could somehow elicit a strong insulin response. If milk really does have a strong insulin response (I'm saying IF it has that), it must be due mainly to the protein content, not the lactose.

Hello! Wake up.

Cheese practically has no lactose, that is why low carbers eat it.

And on the Insulin Index it is lower than other acne safe meats.

Yogurt which does have lactose, has a high insulin spike.

It was a suggestion.

If you don't think that data implies it then you clearly cannot understand data.

We can all say that data maybe wrong, we maybe living in a bloody simulation, so what.

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Hello! Wake up.

Cheese practically has no lactose, that is why low carbers eat it.

Do a Google search on the lactose content of various cheeses. Some specific cheeses seem to have even MORE lactose (gram-for-gram) than milk. But I agree with you that on average, cheese has considerably less of it than milk.

And on the Insulin Index it is lower than other acne safe meats.

Yogurt which does have lactose, has a high insulin spike.

It was a suggestion.

If you don't think that data implies it then you clearly cannot understand data.

We can all say that data maybe wrong, we maybe living in a bloody simulation, so what.

You've ignored the point I made about why would a simple disaccharide like lactose which doesn't even raise blood sugar very fast even have such an alleged effect on insulin.

.

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Hello! Wake up.

Cheese practically has no lactose, that is why low carbers eat it.

Do a Google search on the lactose content of various cheeses. Some specific cheeses seem to have even MORE lactose (gram-for-gram) than milk. But I agree with you that on average, cheese has considerably less of it than milk.

And on the Insulin Index it is lower than other acne safe meats.

Yogurt which does have lactose, has a high insulin spike.

It was a suggestion.

If you don't think that data implies it then you clearly cannot understand data.

We can all say that data maybe wrong, we maybe living in a bloody simulation, so what.

You've ignored the point I made about why would a simple disaccharide like lactose which doesn't even raise blood sugar very fast even have such an alleged effect on insulin.

.

The percentage of calories from lactose in milk or yogurt is around 33% compared to cheese's 1% . Also ice cream in insulin index table is lower than yogurt because it is partly made of cream which again is very low in lactose and used by low carbers in tea or coffee.

Scientists do not know why dairy has such an insulin response. l would hazard a guess that lactoses requirement of lactase could be involved in the insulin spike.

As I have stated before some acne sufferers are fine with cheese but not lactose bearing dairy.

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Which types of cheese are shown to be lowest in lactose?

Some cheeses are advertised as lactose-free. Based on my understanding though the more aged the cheese, the less lactose it will contain. One company here has everything medium and older advertised as lactose-free.

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There's alot of cheeses in there with all pretty similar values. What are considered 'possible' acne-safe cheeses?

Update - Day 5 of drinking raw milk without any new or more importantly, abnormal breakouts. This is the first dairy I have consumed, butter and cream aside, in abut 4-5 months.

Early signs look promising. Maybe dairy doesn't affect me.

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I think I might also be able to eat cheese without affect. Testing dairy products is turning out to be quite suprising. I'll need to figure out which cheese is safest though.. seems like it might be cottage.

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